24" kids bikes, 2015 (holy mackerel)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    24" kids bikes, 2015 (holy mackerel)

    Well, I just went looking around at the latest crop of 24" wheel mountain bikes for kids, as my son will be getting into that size sometime this summer I expect, and I was surprised at the level of the product available to say the least. We currently have the MEC dash 20" bike, which was very serviceable and reasonably priced, but I did not bother comparison shopping other bikes at all at the time I bought it.

    A quick survey now shows 12 quality bikes in the 24" size available in Canada that could legitimately be used to ride real singletrack (the Don valley in our case), with two more available for shipment from US distributor. They range in SRP from $425 to $2100, in weight from 22 to 30.5 pounds, and so on and so forth. The diversity is actually quite remarkable, and makes for some interesting choices. I haven't actually comparison shopped for a new stock bike since 1997, so I thought I'd make an exercise of it with a spreadsheet treatment. Still have a few data points to fill in, but from a preliminary standpoint, the Rocky vertex 24 is looking like the best overall, at least as far as my initial list of 7 criteria go. The MEC ace bike, which I'd originally assumed I'd end up buying by default more than any other reason, comes out surprisingly well possibly as high as #3 on the list.

    [Edit: I've also since seen at least half a dozen full suspension bikes at the high-end, in a market that appears to have been started by the LilShredder bikes. Their Phenom bike for example is claimed to weigh 26.5 pounds in a cross-country build which is pretty amazing, just more bike than I'm looking for. ]
    Last edited by Kay.; 05-20-2015 at 04:42 AM.

  2. #2
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    I'm in the same boat! Share the spreadsheet!
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

  3. #3
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    There are some threads in the Families and Riding With Kids, and Weight Weenie forums with some pretty impressive lightweight 24" builds as well.
    I found out you can get Schwalbe rocket Rons, and Stans Crest rims in 24".
    The forks, and wheels are generally kind of heavy on 24" mtbs, but there are options.

  4. #4
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    We just bought the RM Vertex for my son's 8th birthday.
    It is a quality bike for sure - haven't weighed it yet.
    He said it was "the best bike ever" so that's good enough for me!

  5. #5
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    I'll post it up when I get it all together. I agree that building the wheelset can have a big impact in this category, I would do that if I could! quite a number of the bikes are coming with air sprung forks now which is good to see.

  6. #6
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    Have white 24" Marin (white) for sale. First $350 takes it.
    If interested please pm.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by canbmw View Post
    We just bought the RM Vertex for my son's 8th birthday.
    It is a quality bike for sure - haven't weighed it yet.
    He said it was "the best bike ever" so that's good enough for me!
    I was also looking at the 24" Vertex for the same occasion. I'm balking a bit at the price vs. years-of-use ratio.

    Plus he wants to be some kind of triathlete (shudder) so we'd probably end up putting slicks on it for most of the year anyways. Stay tuned.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  8. #8
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    OK, here's the spreadsheet in its current form.

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...nHRxYS/pubhtml

    I tried to set the permissions so anyone can access and edit from this link, first time using the google docs may take a few iterations to get everything straight.

    Currently I have 7 numeric criteria, and the rest of the categories are text info. For the numeric criteria, you can assign a relative weighting under 'importance' in the 2nd column, and desired target values for the spec in the 3rd column. Near the bottom, the score row will show a number reflecting how well the values of the 7 criteria, each weighted by the value in the 'importance'' column, match that bike. The highest score is best in this calculation.

    The only weights I have yet are advertised weights, I will try to make the rounds over the next week or two and get some actual values. [Edit: well now I see a bit of a problem. A lot of these bikes are not carried in the store, they are just special order. But, while some are forthcoming many other manufacturers are loathe to admit what the weight is, recommending that you have your dealer weigh the bike for you. It's not catch-22 or anything, but it is annoying. Fortunately, it is possible to scrape together some of the missing weights by searching various forums, and interestingly it seems that european dealers of some of the brands do list the weights that the north american dealers do not. I found that the price-weight data for the 13 bikes with weights correlated to an exponential fit at a surprisingly (or not) high value of 0.9, so I used this relationship to generate predicted weights for the rest of the bikes. A way to use this information for a bike of unknown weight would be to agree with the dealer, in advance of ordering the bike into the shop, that you won't take it unless it matches or beats the predicted weight based on its price. That throws the responsibility to cough up the information on the manufacturer, where it firmly belongs.].

    The brodie menace appears to be discontinued for 2015, so the 2014 numbers are shown here. All the rest appear to be available as 2015 models.
    24" kids bikes, 2015 (holy mackerel)-chart.jpg
    Last edited by Kay.; 06-22-2018 at 09:47 AM.

  9. #9
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    The only input I can possibly add is that I think 3x drivetrains on kids bikes are complete overkill. As a mtbr, I believe the hardest of the "basic" skills is front shifting. I don't see kids needing it before they hit 26", and above, bikes.

    I guess you can always take the shifter, derailleur and rings off.
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by biggie View Post
    the only input i can possibly add is that i think 3x drivetrains on kids bikes are complete overkill. As a mtbr, i believe the hardest of the "basic" skills is front shifting. I don't see kids needing it before they hit 26", and above, bikes.
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  11. #11
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    Totally agreed, the 42 tooth chainring in the 3x drive for this size of bike is not necessary, and I think you can see it as a sort of left-over from yesterday's technology (the appendix of mountain biking?) The four most expensive bikes here are either 1x or 2x it's obviously the way of the future even at this size. Most if not all of the 3x cranksets in this group I suspect are riveted one-piece units (the Vertex is) so it's probably the most obvious upgrade.

  12. #12
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    Just a FYI, I see a MEC Dash kid's MTB in a new listing on Hamilton Kijiji
    MEC dash kids mountain bike | kids | Hamilton | Kijiji

  13. #13
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    What about the Ghost Powerkid 24" at MEC? Ghost Powerkid 24 Disc Bicycle (Kids') - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available

    Also, why did you choose the Davinci Chuck over the Ewok?? My LBS is really pushing the Davinci.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ludwig1 View Post
    What about the Ghost Powerkid 24" at MEC? Ghost Powerkid 24 Disc Bicycle (Kids') - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available

    Also, why did you choose the Davinci Chuck over the Ewok?? My LBS is really pushing the Davinci.
    For Devinci and all the others where multiple models exist, I just listed the top bike. In the case of specialized, the two top bikes are so drastically different I put them both in. In the case of MEC, by that same logic I would actually have listed the ghost instead... except the Mec bike is at least designed in Canada, so hey have to go with that. [Edit: saw the Ewoc in-store and got an actual weight for it, plus the spec's do seem better for the price so I put it in]
    Last edited by Kay.; 05-05-2015 at 04:37 AM.

  15. #15
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    I picked up a 2010 Gary Fisher Precal 24 for my 8-year old son:

    2010 Gary Fisher PreCaliber 24 - New and Used Bike Value

    This has worked out quite nicely for him.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrugStoreCowboy View Post
    I picked up a 2010 Gary Fisher Precal 24 for my 8-year old son:

    2010 Gary Fisher PreCaliber 24 - New and Used Bike Value

    This has worked out quite nicely for him.
    Anywhere you can get a used bike of this quality, grab it. I've been checking craiglist and kijiji now and then for quite a while but never saw much, hence the decision to buy new. On a side note, when I went looking for the precaliber ( I have the 20" precaliber as well), I only just found out what you probably all knew for a while that Trek phased out the brand. Along with Lemond and Klein a lot of great history kind of flushed down the bottom line there.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay. View Post
    Anywhere you can get a used bike of this quality, grab it. I've been checking craiglist and kijiji now and then for quite a while but never saw much, hence the decision to buy new. On a side note, when I went looking for the precaliber ( I have the 20" precaliber as well), I only just found out what you probably all knew for a while that Trek phased out the brand. Along with Lemond and Klein a lot of great history kind of flushed down the bottom line there.
    Agreed. It is an excellent bike, and my little guy really likes it. It's a shame they phased out some of those brand names, like Gary Fisher etc. I'm glad I managed to grab this as I haven't really found anything close to being this good since on Kijiji.

  18. #18
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    Found a nice pink 2012 Specialized Hotrock 20" on Kijiji a week ago for my 7-year-old daughter, who is still mad at me for buying her a blue 16" Giant three years ago.

    The Hotrock still weighs quite a bit for what it is, and has that Suntour boat anchor of a fork up front, but it's still lighter than a department store bike, and should ride better as well. Hoping to get her riding with me a little this year. She is soooo cautious. I've tried everything. Seriously considering mind altering substances next.

  19. #19
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    This is my little guy in action on his Gary Fisher Precalibre 24 at the Steaming-nostril / Running nose race in St. Jacob's. 24" kids bikes, 2015 (holy mackerel)-16784738820_3613ab4323_k.jpg

  20. #20
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    All this talk and nothing regarding the new trek kids size superfly, 20 and 24". I'm gonna need to buy my oldest a bigger bike before season is out but 24 or 26" is going to depend on how much he grows this year cause not paying 6
    $600+ for a bike he's going to ride for one season.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    All this talk and nothing regarding the new trek kids size superfly, 20 and 24". I'm gonna need to buy my oldest a bigger bike before season is out but 24 or 26" is going to depend on how much he grows this year cause not paying 6
    $600+ for a bike he's going to ride for one season.
    No argument here as far as the Superfly goes. I personally wasn't inclined to go that high for the reason you've already stated, $600.00+ for one, perhaps 2 years is a bit rich. The Precalibre 24 I got for my little guy hits the sweet spot. It's extremely light, works like a charm and the price point for me simply worked. If I had the money to spare, then sure, I'd love to have gone for the Superfly. It's a quandry we all are dealing with when buying bikes for our kids...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by chansen View Post
    She is soooo cautious. I've tried everything. Seriously considering mind altering substances next.
    Have you tried taking her to Joyride? Or a Joyride summer camp? When they see other kids doing it, it's often better than when they see a parent doing it...

  23. #23
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    That's actually a really good idea. Really good.

    But first, I have to convince her that she can ride without training wheels. Last year, I raised them on the 16" wheel bike as far as they could go and still hold up the bike like a kickstand without a rider. She balanced between the wheels fine. But take off the training wheels....and it's a no go.

    No training wheels on the Hotrock. We'll be out with her tomorrow.

    The other thing I'll do is get her out to some races. Albion starts soon.

  24. #24
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    That is an amazing excel table and I have been using. Thanks. So I am in the same boat for my daughter and looking for some input. Trying to stay under he 500 price point, but the marin bayview trail disc has a lot of what I am looking for. But not sure I can afford the almost 744 dollar price tag. The one that I greatly considering is the raleigh eva 24. Main reason it has the single crank, descent chain stay length and seems like it will be a lighter weight. I contacted raleigh and all the LBS did not stock kids bikes. coming in at 460 CAD seems like a good deal. The main item I am concern is the rear gears are a freewheel, and the minimum gear ratio is 1.00 with 32 tooth front and back. Or is it worth the 300 to go with the marin. Also, the 2016 marin bayview comes in at 26.6 lbs.

    On another note, the 2015 mec ace is on sale at 375 right now.....excellent bang for your buck but not what I am after.

    Thoughts.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmgraves View Post
    ...So I am in the same boat for my daughter and looking for some input.....
    I'll be the first to admit that all the facts and figures can be a bit of overkill, and I might have got a bit carried away. Chances are your child will enjoy whatever bike you buy! and as you've found out, what's actually available in a shop can be a deciding factor more so than a lot of these other details. Another aspect I'd remind is that as a rule I'd say you could expect to get about 50% of the price back selling it used when your child is done with it so factor that in with cost. With all that said, I would try to find the lightest bike for your budget and as an anecdotal comment, as i worked up the spreadsheet i did notice that the marin bayview scored consistently well no matter how i jigged the scoring relationships. I never did see one in a store though. Good luck!

  26. #26
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    Again
    Very good points. I do get wrapped up in the details but no matter what she will enjoy it. So what bike did you go with? And why?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmgraves View Post
    Again
    Very good points. I do get wrapped up in the details but no matter what she will enjoy it. So what bike did you go with? And why?
    Well that didn't quite work out as I'd thought it might back in the spring, since the current 20" is still working perfectly well, I just kind of kept putting off the shopping so now it's next spring's concern. It kind of depends on how much you want your child to ride singletrack as opposed to just recreational riding across a range of all kinds of paths and trails. Singletrack with steep ups needs a gear ratio down in the 0.7 range as far as I'm concerned, which excludes the 1x configuration that is a hot trend in mountain bikes these days. certainly an adult can push a 1x bike over just about anything, but for a kid I think you still need lower gearing. So I'd start with the singletrack question and go from there.

  28. #28
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    I'm actually finding that looking at the "top" models may be a mistake in some cases. Several manufacturers (Trek, Raleigh, Giant) sell cheaper 1x7 24" bikes with a rigid fork. Their more expensive models mostly use cheap suspension forks with stiff springs, and go to a 3x7 drivetrain which I find totally unnecessary (and heavy). Weighed Raleigh's 1x7 yesterday at a shop and it came in around 22lbs... that's a full 5lb lighter than a lot of the bikes previously mentioned!
    Ride to Work, Work to Live, Live to Ride

  29. #29
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    If you like to tinker, buying a used bike for the frame, and replacing all the parts is a cheaper and better option than top shelf 24" offerings. For a fork, an old 26" Rock Shox SID reduced to 63mm travel has a very similar axle to crown measurement as current 24 inch suspension fork offerings, at a much lighter weight and much better/more tuneable performance.
    Many other great options can be found in the builds in the "Families, and riding with kids" forum on here.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by burnedthetoast View Post
    I'm actually finding that looking at the "top" models may be a mistake in some cases. Several manufacturers (Trek, Raleigh, Giant) sell cheaper 1x7 24" bikes with a rigid fork. Their more expensive models mostly use cheap suspension forks with stiff springs, and go to a 3x7 drivetrain which I find totally unnecessary (and heavy). Weighed Raleigh's 1x7 yesterday at a shop and it came in around 22lbs... that's a full 5lb lighter than a lot of the bikes previously mentioned!
    This is true; these folks have taken that line of thinking to quite an extreme, at a very reasonable price (prior to the collapse of our petro-currency anyway):

    WOOM5 Supra Rigid 24" Kids Mountain Bike Review

    The 24" air sprung forks though are getting spec'd on more and more bikes it seems though, and even the 20" coil fork on my kid's bike gave a very useable 30+mm of travel that wasn't compromised performance-wise, it was just a weight issue. So I don't think the fork is quite the bugbear it used to be.

  31. #31
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    That WOOM5 looks great. I've never heard of that one. Gearing may be steep for singletrack though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stew325 View Post
    That WOOM5 looks great. I've never heard of that one. Gearing may be steep for singletrack though.
    I agree, that gear ratio won't work for singletrack.

    (cue the familiar sounds of tinkering... )

  33. #33
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    I added a tab for the 2016 bikes, see the bottom left of the spreadsheet. The specs are mostly unchanged, while the price changes are more variable again due to the afore-mentioned collapse of our petro-currency.

    I ended up going with a used bike in the end, and since quality kids bikes are rarely found used, I got an xs 26'er instead. There aren't a lot of xs size adult bikes out there either, but if you find one the frame size is generally a good match with all these 24" bikes. The crank length and possibly the brake levers will be an issue, as will stand-over height, but overall it worked for me. With respect to stew325's suggestion, while I didn't manage to find a suitable used bike to re-build from scratch, I did look at ordering an xs 26'er carbon frame from taiwan. The no-haggle rock-bottom price of these no-name frames borders on believability, but ultimately I wasn't able to overcome my possibly irrational doubt about quality control risks.

    Waiting for the trails to dry up now. Better than watching paint dry, but not by much.

  34. #34
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    For some strange reason, I've bought three 24" kids bikes in the past year. All for 7-8 year olds. Only one of which was biologically mine. I digress.

    I'm pretty loyal to one LBS in the area because they sponsor a race series, so I had Trek and Norco bikes to choose from. Wanted decent parts, light frame, and ideally a rigid fork to keep things light, and away from those Suntour boat anchor coil forks. Those bikes are north of 30 lbs.

    Found that was hard to do.

    Thought the Trek MT220 was a good option. Looks simple, but it's a heavy steel frame. Came out to 30 lbs even with a rigid fork, iirc.

    Last year, bought a Norco Detonator, partly because it had mech disc brakes. But with the triple chainring and Suntour fork, it came out to 32 lbs once it arrived. Oh well, the kid likes it. The bars are a little narrow, and crowded with all the controls. Wish they were wider. I may ditch the front derailleur until that one is older. See if I can scrounge up some wider bars to give him more balance - he needs the help.

    Early this spring (actually, still winter), in a moment of weakness because she had been an awesome daughter, bought mine a Norco Storm 4.1 girls bike. Much better bike. 1x7 gearing, mech discs, wider bars, but a Suntour fork still. I might change it out for a rigid, but it's a much better bike than the older Detonator. Don't have a weight, but definitely less than 30 lbs.

    Then the other girl got a Storm 4.3. This is a cheaper bike with v brakes and a rigid fork, but it's the best of the bunch as far as I'm concerned. Lighter, simpler, better.

    I've bought used kids bikes before, but I find that used boys bikes are usually beat up, and I had been waiting forever for a good used girls 24" bike with no luck.

    I think the Woom5 Supra looks even better, but by the time you get it into Canada...

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by chansen View Post

    Thought the Trek MT220 was a good option. Looks simple, but it's a heavy steel frame. Came out to 30 lbs even with a rigid fork, iirc.

    ...

    I've bought used kids bikes before, but I find that used boys bikes are usually beat up, and I had been waiting forever for a good used girls 24" bike with no luck.
    I've seen three of the trek mt220's come up on kijiji this spring, and missed the first two as they do go fast. I managed however to get the third just a few days ago which I'll set up as a guest bike on the off chance I can persuade a non-biking parent of one of my kid's friends to let their kid out on a dirt trail. However, being almost a decade old (based on a Halton tag dated 2008), the trek-branded suntour fork had quite a stunningly stiff spring, I couldn't much compress it myself. I pulled it out and from the dimensions estimated the spring rate at about 90 lbs/in. At 0.844" diameter, it is an exact match for a spring which can be ordered from mcmaster and cut to length, which will give me anything from a max of 67 lb/in spring rate on downwards to as low as needed. I'll swap a few of my spare parts onto it here and there, and hoping for sub-30 pounds without much cost. I agree that a lot of kids bikes at this price point and below are going to come well-used, but I got a bit lucky as this bike had clearly not been used ever since the (possibly ill-fated) trip to Halton in 2008.
    Last edited by Kay.; 04-25-2016 at 01:07 PM.

  36. #36
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    I measured the mt220 and got a reading of 26 lbs 14 oz, which was a bit of a surprise. But a bit of searching had also returned this thread:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/trek/08-09-tr...bs-490062.html

    while a little more searching had returned this thread:

    Trek Recalls Girls Bicycles Due To Frame Failure | CPSC.gov

    So it looks like the boys version of the bike was ok, and possibly a high-water mark for trek if the newer bikes have become heavier again.

  37. #37
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    While many of you have correctly noted that some of these kids bikes border on overkill, I had the pleasure of seeing the Scott Jr 24 in action on the weekend. My son's friend age 9 is riding that bike to much, if not all, of its capability. I say that based on his sight riding (is there a phrase for riding a trail first time sight unseen? in music it's called sight reading) the upper line of the boo trail at regular adult (ie not racing or anything) speed. It's not the hardest line in the valley or anything, but this kid has ridden everything else on the west side too including the burke's brook loop and this was just the one I saw for myself. That young gentleman is why this spreadsheet exists. I look at all the other sports that kids participate in at quite high levels (skiing comes to mind) and ask why not mountain biking too?

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    Are you ready to sell it?

    I started looking for a 24" from MEC today and stumbled across this old thread. Any chance you are ready to sell that bike?



    Quote Originally Posted by Kay. View Post
    Well, I just went looking around at the latest crop of 24" wheel mountain bikes for kids, as my son will be getting into that size sometime this summer I expect, and I was surprised at the level of the product available to say the least. We currently have the MEC dash 20" bike, which was very serviceable and reasonably priced, but I did not bother comparison shopping other bikes at all at the time I bought it.

    A quick survey now shows 12 quality bikes in the 24" size available in Canada that could legitimately be used to ride real singletrack (the Don valley in our case), with two more available for shipment from US distributor. They range in SRP from $425 to $2100, in weight from 22 to 30.5 pounds, and so on and so forth. The diversity is actually quite remarkable, and makes for some interesting choices. I haven't actually comparison shopped for a new stock bike since 1997, so I thought I'd make an exercise of it with a spreadsheet treatment. Still have a few data points to fill in, but from a preliminary standpoint, the Rocky vertex 24 is looking like the best overall, at least as far as my initial list of 7 criteria go. The MEC ace bike, which I'd originally assumed I'd end up buying by default more than any other reason, comes out surprisingly well possibly as high as #3 on the list.

    [Edit: I've also since seen at least half a dozen full suspension bikes at the high-end, in a market that appears to have been started by the LilShredder bikes. Their Phenom bike for example is claimed to weigh 26.5 pounds in a cross-country build which is pretty amazing, just more bike than I'm looking for. ]

  39. #39
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    Thanks for keeping the spreadsheet updated.

    I did look at it when I was buying a MEC Ace Ltd for my daughter two years ago.

    It has been a great bike. One thing to keep in mind when looking is what kind of upgrades you can do cheaply yourself (either immediately or when things wear out).

    Over the last two years we have put ~$200 into the bike:
    - Orbea 152mm cranks
    - RaceFace 30T NW chainring
    - HG-50 11-34 cassette (HG-31 has weird steps)
    - Maxxis DTH tires (she is mostly urban & hardpack - you could go with Rocket Rons)

    Ultimately this resulted in:
    - 152mm cranks
    - 0.88 min gear ratio
    - under 25lb weight (stock tires are heavy)
    - total cost of ~CAD$625 into bike (~CAD$700 w/tax)

    I'd be curious to see how that scores on your sheet.

    Next year the challenge will be finding a small 27.5 for her.

  40. #40
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    Well that is nice to hear, and yes you have exactly identified the angle that the spreadsheet only hints at. For anyone with a bit of time and knowledge, you can buy an under-spec'd bike for a certain amount of money and upgrade it selectively to get the best overall result. I would say that that strategy will work better starting with used than starting with new, but it's the same approach either way. In my case I bought 3 used bikes since that 20" MEC Dash, one got a total rebuild, one got a few spare pieces, and one was good to go. And then the spreadsheet is just a way to ensure that you come out ahead in the process. Sorry I haven't in fact used the spreadsheet at all recently, I was between jobs when I did the last round of work on it but probably won't get back to it anytime soon. Cheers!

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Stay tuned.
    I hope no one was still tuned, because my kids are now both on road bikes.

    A complete and utter failure of "mountain bike parenting"?
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I hope no one was still tuned, because my kids are now both on road bikes.

    A complete and utter failure of "mountain bike parenting"?
    Lol My kid got into BMX. I made him ride his mountain bike. Then I bought myself a 24" BMX. Parenting win!
    I want something good to die for
    To make it beautiful to live
    I want a new mistake, lose is more than hesitate.

  43. #43
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    Might be a good thing, check this shit out

    https://www.norco.com/bikes/2020/you...luminum-youth/
    ..now just tinker with our bikes and feed the cats. - oldbear52

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiThundrrr View Post
    Lol My kid got into BMX. I made him ride his mountain bike. Then I bought myself a 24" BMX. Parenting win!
    The kids haven't tried to get dad to do a triathlon yet, probably because they're afraid I'd drown before I even got to the bike part.

    Sometimes dads need baby steps....
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  45. #45
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    I too found the spreadsheet quite useful. I ended up buying the MEC Ace Ltd on sale for 425 CAD$. I'll do a few mods on it:
    - Tap new holes for 140 mm cranks. Taps are cheap on aliexpress and the stock 165mm is just ridiculous.
    - Use a cheap chinese carbon handlebar in my parts bin
    - Perhaps new tires after weighing the stock ones
    - Upgrade to a Sunrace CSM680 11-40T 8-speed cassette for easier climbing gears (only about 25 USD$)

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