Shimano Chains of confusion?!?! 10 speed chains- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Shimano Chains of confusion?!?! 10 speed chains

    My relatively-new Shimano chain decided to go all pretzel on me today, and I stopped by the LBS to pick up a new one.

    What was on the bike was a CN-HG95.

    They sold me a CN-6600

    Looking online, I still see the HG95 available. But I also see a CN-6700 and CN-6701

    Sooo... There are 4 different options for Shimano 10-speed chains? What are the differences between the 4? Which is the best for MTB?

    So confused! Advice would be appreciated!
    I get paid to ride shotgun.

  2. #2
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    CN-6600 is an Ultegra chain optimized for their road cassettes. HG-95 is xt and optimized for 10 speed mtb. cassettes. The Ultegra will work but I'd prefer the xt.

    I'm sure you'll get lots of advice to try another brand but I've always had really good luck with the xt (HG-95) which is a bargain these days @~$20US.

  3. #3
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    MAybe the blind leading the blind, here. Your old chain was a "directional" chain designed to be used one way. The 6600 is a 10 spd non-directional and crosses with road application. 6701 is the Ultegra Road 10 spd hollow pin non-directional.

  4. #4
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    I'm sure there are some minor differences between Shimano MTB and road chains but I wouldn't sweat it too much. I recent built a a new MTB and used a cn5600, 105 level "road" chain, I had laying around. XT cassette, SLX derailer, Deore shifter and it is one of the best shifting bikes I have had.

    I'd may have a bigger effect on front shifting though, which I have no personal experience with.

  5. #5
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    "Shimano pushed the shifting performance of Dyna-Sys 10-speed components by making a directional chain with four different plates -- both sides/inner and outer. It's understandable that it would seem they've reached the zenith in chain technology, but that's not how Shimano works. Instead, with the CN-HG95 XT 10-Speed Chain, they found a way to reduce friction by 60 percent between inner and outer links.

    A new Sil-Tec treatment on the plates allows them the freely pivot around derailleur pulleys, cogs, and chain rings. Back to the directional aspect of Dyna-Sys chains, since the action of climbing up ramps and pins from one chainring to another is slightly different than climbing up one cog to the next, Shimano chose to shape the left and right side plates differently to optimize the plates for each specific purpose."

    Go with the HG95 for the Sil-Tec. Better mud shedding and increased chain life. Mine stays cleaner and lasts.
    No Sil-Tec on the road chains.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    "Shimano pushed the shifting performance of Dyna-Sys 10-speed components by making a directional chain with four different plates -- both sides/inner and outer. It's understandable that it would seem they've reached the zenith in chain technology, but that's not how Shimano works. Instead, with the CN-HG95 XT 10-Speed Chain, they found a way to reduce friction by 60 percent between inner and outer links.

    A new Sil-Tec treatment on the plates allows them the freely pivot around derailleur pulleys, cogs, and chain rings. Back to the directional aspect of Dyna-Sys chains, since the action of climbing up ramps and pins from one chainring to another is slightly different than climbing up one cog to the next, Shimano chose to shape the left and right side plates differently to optimize the plates for each specific purpose."

    Go with the HG95 for the Sil-Tec. Better mud shedding and increased chain life. Mine stays cleaner and lasts.
    No Sil-Tec on the road chains.
    THIS! This is what I needed to hear. A "why" to which one to choose.

    I wish there was a graph/chart available to compare the different chain part numbers.

    Thanks everyone!!!
    I get paid to ride shotgun.

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