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  1. #1
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    Shimano 11-46 cassette: is it going to happen?

    I've heard rumors Shimano is prototyping a 11-46 11-speed cassette. If this came to fruition, it would solve a particular problem I have with my fatbike.

    Does anyone know if this is actually going to happen, and if so when?

    Or at least, does anyone know generally when Shimano tends to release new stuff?
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    I don't know anything myself but RC of Pinkbike made mention of an upcoming 11-45 shimano cassette in an article recently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I've heard rumors Shimano is prototyping a 11-46 11-speed cassette. If this came to fruition, it would solve a particular problem I have with my fatbike.

    Does anyone know if this is actually going to happen, and if so when?

    Or at least, does anyone know generally when Shimano tends to release new stuff?
    For now can get the One-Up 45 cog now. It works great with Shimano 11 speed OneUp Your Shimano 11 Speed Drivetrain - Pinkbike ...

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    I ran a One Up 42 extender on my 1x10 hack job last season and it was okay, but I was never quite happy with the 16t cog. It worked well enough, but barely... It was a nice solution to update my aging drivetrain on the cheap, but I can't imagine sticking one of their cogs in the middle of a wonderful new 11sp XTR cassette.

  5. #5
    viva la v-brakes!
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    The One-Up thing won't work for me as I need to disassemble and rearrange the cassette for my own purposes.


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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    The One-Up thing won't work for me as I need to disassemble and rearrange the cassette for my own purposes.


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    Not sure I understand why a complete Shimano cassette would be more "disassamble-ble" than a Shimano cassette with an added cog, but anyway this is the link about 1146 Spy Shot: Prototype 11-46 Wide Range Shimano Cassette and generally Shimano stuff gets announced end of March/April.

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    I hope they don't release those, otherwise I'll be obligated to upgrade to XT 1x11...

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    Well, looks like it will actually happen in 2017. This just hit the Internets...
    NEW SHIMANO 11-SPEED DRIVE TRAIN ADDITIONS
    Today Shimano releases a selection of new products and features making their way into the component manufacturer’s 2017 road and MTB line-ups.

    Mountain bikers benefit from new 11-speed drivetrain additions with the following new products:

    1×11 chain ring with Dynamic Chain Engagement
    Wide ranging 11-46T cassette compatible with XTR or DEORE XT 1×11 set ups
    QUICK-LINK for 11-speed chains

    NEW SHIMANO 11-SPEED DRIVE TRAIN ADDITIONS - Dirt
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mevnet View Post
    Well, looks like it will actually happen in 2017. This just hit the Internets...
    NEW SHIMANO 11-SPEED DRIVE TRAIN ADDITIONS
    Today Shimano releases a selection of new products and features making their way into the component manufacturer’s 2017 road and MTB line-ups.

    Mountain bikers benefit from new 11-speed drivetrain additions with the following new products:

    1×11 chain ring with Dynamic Chain Engagement
    Wide ranging 11-46T cassette compatible with XTR or DEORE XT 1×11 set ups
    QUICK-LINK for 11-speed chains

    NEW SHIMANO 11-SPEED DRIVE TRAIN ADDITIONS - Dirt
    Yei! too bad that there might not be a XTR 1146, but still a XT 1146 (at around $80) is pretty good. Range is identical to 1042 with no need of dedicated hub and the 10 cog thingy.

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    Thing's I like, a new low $$$ shimano hydro brake.

    I can't help but think how many freehubs will be completely destroyed by that 46T cog. That's a lot of torque, and a lot of freehubs won't be able to handle it.

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    I like that cassette. I've got a 28t chainring now, and that 46t cog would let me bump up to a bigger chainring to maintain the same low end gearing. Might actually convince me to go 11spd.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I like that cassette. I've got a 28t chainring now, and that 46t cog would let me bump up to a bigger chainring to maintain the same low end gearing. Might actually convince me to go 11spd.
    I have been on 1145/30 for the last 6 months (XT + One-Up) and it gives a very nice range. I would have loved to see a XTR 1146 at 350 grams but ... hey you cannot have everything ... Shimano puts their spin on Narrow Wide chainrings, adds 11-46t cassette, quick link, new gearing, more! - Bikerumor

  13. #13
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    lol a quick link and narrow wide ring. revolutionary!

  14. #14
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    Lol...I wonder how long before third party companies start coming out with the Shimano teeth profiles.

  15. #15
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    Curiously, Shimano's web site suggests none of their current derailleurs are compatible with a 46 tooth cassette which would mean you'd need to upgrade both the cassette and DR. A lot of their 11 speed derailleurs suggest they are limited to 40t cassettes.

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    Don't you think it was foreseeable that people would want more range? Why not do it right to begin with? We are being nickle and dimed.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
    Curiously, Shimano's web site suggests none of their current derailleurs are compatible with a 46 tooth cassette which would mean you'd need to upgrade both the cassette and DR. A lot of their 11 speed derailleurs suggest they are limited to 40t cassettes.
    Again: XT and XTR 11 speed are perfectly compatible with 45 teeth, B-screw is not even half way in. 46 will work perfectly fine.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    Again: XT and XTR 11 speed are perfectly compatible with 45 teeth, B-screw is not even half way in. 46 will work perfectly fine.
    Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. I'm aware actual ranges vary, I was just observing what their web-site recommends. They'll probably launch new derailleurs along with this and encourage people to upgrade those also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
    Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. I'm aware actual ranges vary, I was just observing what their web-site recommends. They'll probably launch new derailleurs along with this and encourage people to upgrade those also.
    Sram and Shimano launch new stuff every year, so what's new?
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    When 3rd party companies find ways to "improve" a new offering from either one of the two bigs you know that there's more to come from them. I am specifically referring to the 44t/ 45t sprockets from OneUp.
    It was too late for Shimano and SRAM to do anything for the 10 speed drivetrains ans they had their efforts already on the new, 11 spd products. So the 10 spd extended cassette market will be owned by 3rd party companies for as long as we still find components for them. It's still the easiest/ cheapest way to switch to an 1x system especially for SRAM drivetrain owners.
    As for chains and N/W teeth profile and quick links....talk about late to the party but happy to see them coming from Shimano.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Thing's I like, a new low $$$ shimano hydro brake.

    I can't help but think how many freehubs will be completely destroyed by that 46T cog. That's a lot of torque, and a lot of freehubs won't be able to handle it.

    "I was just pedaling along, and boom!"
    That's a good point. With all of that leverage I wonder if there will be issues?
    I won't be finding out since I have 2 bikes on 3x9 and 1 bike with 2x10.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
    Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. I'm aware actual ranges vary, I was just observing what their web-site recommends. They'll probably launch new derailleurs along with this and encourage people to upgrade those also.
    I'm guessing they will update the docs like they did to say xtr was 42 compatible after the 11-42 cs was released!

    They might take some time to do that though!

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    Indirectly, this tells me that 2017 model year Shimano stuff should also handle 9-44T setups pretty comfortably as well, which is probably what I'll end up running (XT RD, Shifter, cables).

    I'm actually fairly excited about this as the low-cost 1x conversion option for existing bikes for users in seriously mountainous areas. I also think this will be the ideal setup for touring bikes - a CX crankset paired with this cassette means massive gearing range (but likely some potential issues with derailleur capacity), but that in a Di2 variant would be totally sick - call it the XTR-OMNI or something, and it would be a hit.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by tehllama View Post
    Indirectly, this tells me that 2017 model year Shimano stuff should also handle 9-44T setups pretty comfortably as well, which is probably what I'll end up running (XT RD, Shifter, cables).
    Now it's going to be a race to see which of the smaller guys launches 9-46 or 9-48 cassettes first. A 9-48 tooth cassette would be a 533% range. Heck, I'll bet we see an aftermarket 11-speed 50t cassette/ cog by year end.

  25. #25
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    can any current derailleur even handle a 50t cog?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    can any current derailleur even handle a 50t cog?
    I'm not sure about current derailleurs, but historically Shimano under-states capacity of their derailleurs. If they have a DR they list as being capable of running a 46t cog, there is a fair chance it'll be capable of running a 50t.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Thing's I like, a new low $$$ shimano hydro brake.

    I can't help but think how many freehubs will be completely destroyed by that 46T cog. That's a lot of torque, and a lot of freehubs won't be able to handle it.

    "I was just pedaling along, and boom!"
    Lot of torque? Not more than when using the granny on a triple krank with a 11-32 kassette. You need to look at the ratio of the front and rear chainrings to determine the torque on the freehub.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan View Post
    Lot of torque? Not more than when using the granny on a triple krank with a 11-32 kassette. You need to look at the ratio of the front and rear chainrings to determine the torque on the freehub.
    EDIT: Not enough coffee, the following is wrong.

    Nope. torque on the freehub is completely independent of what chainring is used up front. torque is based on how much force is applied perpendicular to the axle and how far it is away from the axle.

    gear inches may be the same, but the torque generated is completely different. Another physics kicker, when you use a small 22T ring up front, you're applying less force on the chain than when you use a larger 32T ring. If you use a 36T chainring and a 42T cog in back, you're creating a lot more force on the chain than if you use a 24T chainring and a 28T cog in back, even if the gear inches are the exact same. One of the reason why SS bikes don't go crazy large on their rings. You want just big enough so you spread the force out on the number of teeth.
    Last edited by watts888; 03-02-2016 at 07:58 AM.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Another physics kicker, when you use a small 22T ring up front, you're applying less force on the chain than when you use a larger 32T ring.
    No, it's the opposite. Smaller front ring means more force on the chain, and that again means more torque on the freehub when using the same rear cog.

    So if you use a 36T chainring and a 42T cog in back, you're creating less force on the chain than if you use a 24T chainring and a 28T cog in back. But the torque on the freehub will be the same.

  30. #30
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    I'm with Jan on this one, the torque applied to the freehub is dependent on the torque multiplication from the combination of the rear cog AND front chainring.

    Same rear cog but smaller chainring = more torque at the freehub.

    Also agree that larger cog/chainring combinations create less force on the chain. Larger chainring up front reduces leverage and therefore torque. The larger cog out back increases torque at the hub, but only after the chain has transferred torque to the cog.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan View Post
    No, it's the opposite. Smaller front ring means more force on the chain, and that again means more torque on the freehub when using the same rear cog.
    After think about this more, I'm wrong. I'll do some math later on and post it up with the various forces and torques. If the pedal force and the force the rear wheel applies against the trail are kept constant, regardless of the gear combo to get there, the torque on the freehub should be the same.

    This brings up the question then, why did shimano make a big deal about their deore SLX 529 rear hub for the 36T cogs a couple years ago? It was required to meet some european union standard because with the 11-34T 9-speed cassette, the older hubs would work, but with the 12-36T cassette, they would fail (at least on paper). Maybe they required the chain tension to be the same for the test?
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    This brings up the question then, why did shimano make a big deal about their deore SLX 529 rear hub for the 36T cogs a couple years ago? It was required to meet some european union standard because with the 11-34T 9-speed cassette, the older hubs would work, but with the 12-36T cassette, they would fail (at least on paper). Maybe they required the chain tension to be the same for the test?
    Because the hub torque changes when you make the cog larger and leave everything else the same.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by craigsj View Post
    Because the hub torque changes when you make the cog larger and leave everything else the same.
    But that's the problem. It's not the same. I thought the chain force would be comparable, but I was wrong. If you are exerting the same amount of pedaling force on a bike going up a hill in the same way, the gearing combination required to get you there will have the exact same torque at the crankset and rear axle. The only thing that's difference is how much force is applied to and from the chain. It actually looks like using a larger chainring will reduce the tension on the chain, which will cause less chainwear. Only problem is added weight from larger chainrings and cassette cogs.

    I'll make a couple calculation basis:
    Maximum pedal force = 200 lbs force, big guy standing and mashing on the pedals
    Crankarm length = 175mm = 6.9"
    Gear comparison 1 - Radius of 36T chainring = 2.86"
    Gear comparison 1 - Radius of 42T cog = 3.34"
    Gear comparison 2 - Radius of 24T chainring = 1.91"
    Gear comparison 2 - Radius of 28T cog = 2.23"
    Gear inches of both 36T-42T = 24T-28T = 0.86
    Outer diameter of rear tire is 29"

    36T/42T combo
    big guy mashes on pedals, 200 lbs force on the pedals at 6.9" from the crankarm center which applies 115 ft-lbs torque at the crankset hub. Force is transfered to the 36T chainring at 2.86" from the hub, which applies 483 pounds force on the chain. The chain transfers that force to the rear 42T cog at 3.34" from the rear axle, creating 134.3 ft-lbs torque at the rear axle. Moved out to the tire edge at 29", this causes 55.5 pounds force pushing you forward

    24T/28T combo.
    big guy mashes on pedals, 200 lbs force on the pedals at 6.9" from the crankarm center which applies 115 ft-lbs torque at the crankset hub. force is transfered to the 24T chainring at 1.91" from the hub, which applies 722.5 pounds force on the chain. The chain transfers that force to the rear 28T cog at 2.23" from the rear axle, creating 134.3 ft-lbs torque at the rear axle. Moved out to the tire edge at 29", this causes 55.5 pounds force pushing you forward.
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  34. #34
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    Congratulations, you just discovered the concept of gain ratio

    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    This brings up the question then, why did shimano make a big deal about their deore SLX 529 rear hub for the 36T cogs a couple years ago?
    In order to achieve the same Gain Ratio on a 29er (vs a 26er), you need a smaller Gear Ratio, and that's what this 12-36 cassette was for: to be used on a 29er with a back-then-standard 22-32-44 triple chainset.
    26'ers used the same chainset but with 11-32 or 11-34 cassettes.
    This smaller gear ratio resulted in higher torque on the rear hub.

    This new hub also had more points of engagement (POE) than before, which is also a good thing on a 29er, though Shimano still doesn't have the same POE's as King or i9.
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    But that's the problem. It's not the same.
    You are not comparing the same configurations as the ones I was replying to.

    If the overall gain of the gearing system is unchanged, then the only things that change with intermediate gear variations are intermediate forces (ignoring efficiency). Don't know why that would surprise anyone, that's how gearing works.

    If you change the cog size without changing anything else, then the gain changes. Going from 34 to 36T increases the cog's leverage on the hub (slightly).

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by craigsj View Post
    You are not comparing the same configurations as the ones I was replying to.

    If you change the cog size without changing anything else, then the gain changes. Going from 34 to 36T increases the cog's leverage on the hub (slightly).
    True, but if you keep the same chainring up front and adjust the cog size in back, you don't need to pedal as hard, which decreases the force applied to the cog, but since it's applied further out from the axle (36T vs. 34T), it still has same torque.
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    That's kinda what gear ratio does, yeah.

    Either you can assume the force on the rear tire is a constant, which is true when you're riding up the same hill with a constant speed , so (wheelsize and rider weight being constant as well) torque on the rear hub is the same regardless of the gear ratio you use.

    Or you can assume the force the rider can put on the pedals is a constant, in which case a lower gear ratio can put a higher torque on the freehub (enabling the rider to ride steeper climbs)


    Anyhow: 32/46 is not spectacularly low in any way (about the same as 24/34) so no more freehubs are gonna die with this 11-46 cassette than with any 2x or 3x drivetrain.
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    Quote Originally Posted by asphaltdude View Post
    Congratulations, you just discovered the concept of gain ratio

    In order to achieve the same Gain Ratio on a 29er (vs a 26er), you need a smaller Gear Ratio, and that's what this 12-36 cassette was for: to be used on a 29er with a back-then-standard 22-32-44 triple chainset.
    26'ers used the same chainset but with 11-32 or 11-34 cassettes.
    This smaller gear ratio resulted in higher torque on the rear hub.
    .
    It's nice to know I learned something at least. I always put sheldon browns gear calculator in MPH when doing gearing comparisons. So it's more of the 26" vs 29er" issue than a gearing issue. In that case, I can see how it would require more torque at the axle to maintain the same force out of the rear wheel.
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    Gain Ratio is really illustrative.

    Also when thinking about the effect of crank length.
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    True, but if you keep the same chainring up front and adjust the cog size in back, you don't need to pedal as hard, which decreases the force applied to the cog, but since it's applied further out from the axle (36T vs. 34T), it still has same torque.
    Is it your goal to make a simple matter difficult to understand by constantly changing conditions or does this make you feel you are winning an argument?

    Yes, it's true that if you pedal less hard the torque applied on the rear hub will lessen. You got us all on that one.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by craigsj View Post
    Is it your goal to make a simple matter difficult to understand by constantly changing conditions or does this make you feel you are winning an argument?
    Not trying to win an argument. It's the internet after all. Arguments are never won, just argued over even more. Mostly trying to talk out the crazy big 46T cog design with other people and torque on the rear wheel. I obviously had it wrong to begin with, so I tried to talk through what my thought process was. If people called BS on it, and it is BS, I'll agree. If I still don't think it's BS, I'll try it from a different approach. Eventually, right or wrong, it was argued over enough that valuable knowledge was gained.

    I have less fear about using a 46T cog, while before I had serious concerns about using my 42T gear. Now I need to figure out if changing up to 11-speed is worth it.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    can any current derailleur even handle a 50t cog?
    XT8000 and XTR9000 have no problem with aftermarket 45 cog, and the new Shimano 11-46. And they seem to be handling Relic's 48 teeth with no problem!

    Shimano 11-46 cassette: is it going to happen?-use-p1100202.jpg

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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Now I need to figure out if changing up to 11-speed is worth it.
    Ultimately the only real way to answer that is to ride 1x for a while. Fortunately, it's a lot less expensive to experiment with than it was a few years ago.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Not trying to win an argument. It's the internet after all. Arguments are never won, just argued over even more. Mostly trying to talk out the crazy big 46T cog design with other people and torque on the rear wheel. I obviously had it wrong to begin with, so I tried to talk through what my thought process was. If people called BS on it, and it is BS, I'll agree. If I still don't think it's BS, I'll try it from a different approach. Eventually, right or wrong, it was argued over enough that valuable knowledge was gained.

    I have less fear about using a 46T cog, while before I had serious concerns about using my 42T gear. Now I need to figure out if changing up to 11-speed is worth it.
    My approach on that is calculating the lowest gear I need first - then sorting out that ratio. For my AM 29er that is a 31lb monster truck, that happens to be a gear ratio of around 0.65 at the low end if I want a rainy day low gear, maximum 0.7 lowest gear if I still need to climb up steep stuff after 20mi. In 1x11 configurations, this means that a 28x42, 28x44 or 30x46 configuration can work for my uses. Then I figure out what my top end speed is at 90rpm cadence (bikecalc's tables are great on this), and decide if that does what I need it to - I can also compare this to existing gears on my current setup
    On the Shimano XT 11-46, the highest 30-11 combination is basically like my current 22/36 crankset, except I'm losing just under half a gear at the bottom, and just over a gear at the top. Not a bad trade.
    For a 10-42T SRAM, the 28T chainring can get me down to only losing half a gear at the bottom, and a gear at the top - again, I wouldn't be disappointed with this, it's just not worth the cost to move from a perfectly good 2x10 system.
    The e13 eTRS 9-44T, however, can take a 28T chainring for small range loss at the bottom (like using a 24/36 setup), and less than half a gear at the top end (like having an 11.5T small cog on my current setup) - the concern being that I lose some of my intermediate gearing, and even though 95% of the time I'm double-tapping the shifter, I still worry about encountering a sucky long climb and finding myself hunting between ratios. The other part is polygon effect with the 9T - on my AM bike I rarely use that gear, and I'm not too picky on performance, I'm much more concerned about trying the 9T kit on my XC HT that sees regular high speed road riding.

  45. #45
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    I just had a thought: I wonder if there is any chance an older 9-speed rear derailleur will be able to work with this best, or am I SOL? Is it just a matter of turning the b-tension screw around, or are there structural differences in the new derailleurs that would allow them to have more tooth capacity than my older model.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
    Ultimately the only real way to answer that is to ride 1x for a while. Fortunately, it's a lot less expensive to experiment with than it was a few years ago.
    I'm currently running 1x10 with 32T NW up front and 11/42 sunrace in back. I know I'm missing out on some top end speed, but for now, I'll stick with the chainring. I can normally get by with a 32/36 combo, but it is nice having that extra low end gear when I'm beat.
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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I just had a thought: I wonder if there is any chance an older 9-speed rear derailleur will be able to work with this best, or am I SOL?
    Pretty sure the 10 speed and up stuff used a narrower jockey wheel. a 9-speed derailleur might have some trouble. Plus there's always the cable pull difference of the shifter. 10-speed shifters are pretty cheap anymore.
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Pretty sure the 10 speed and up stuff used a narrower jockey wheel. a 9-speed derailleur might have some trouble. Plus there's always the cable pull difference of the shifter. 10-speed shifters are pretty cheap anymore.
    It's friction shifting so cable pull is not an issue. I'll see if it's practical to upgrade the Phillies, if not, I could always retire the old XTR derailed to the touring bike.


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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    It's friction shifting so cable pull is not an issue. I'll see if it's practical to upgrade the Phillies, if not, I could always retire the old XTR derailed to the touring bike.


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  50. #50
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    Ha! PULLIES.


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  51. #51
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    any word on price? Looks like this should be available this summer!

  52. #52
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    NICE! A 46T rear!

    Now when is S going to make some carbon lightweight carbon cranks and sealed bearing hubs?
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  53. #53
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    what's the gearing on the 11-46 cassette? I can't find that info...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post
    what's the gearing on the 11-46 cassette? I can't find that info...
    HAHA.....me either! I've click on at least 15 links

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by knoob View Post
    HAHA.....me either! I've click on at least 15 links
    I don't think they'd releases full specs yet. They've just acknowledged they are indeed making a wider range cassette.

  56. #56
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    Indeed. If there is one thing that Shimano should learn from SRAM, it's product releases.

    SRAM is all about visuals, stoke-inducing videos, high resolution pictures and sponsored articles everywhere.

    Shimano, on the other hand, is like "yeah, we kind of work on this doodad, and that doodad, and this little thing. But we will not show you any of it, because reasons".

    I know more about the Eagle then I know about XTR Di2 at this point.

  57. #57
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    found this picture at vital, this is not the shimano cassette, it's actually a 10 speed it looks like starting at 13T, but we can speculate that's how the shimano cassette is gonna look like in terms of gearing

    https://p.vitalmtb.com/photos/users/...jpg?1457024022

    gearing would look like this, which is pretty much what oneup does replacing the 17-19 by 18T. I like this range. and the 36-40 still give you plenty before you use the 46!

    11-13-15-18-21-24-28-32-36-40-46

    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-42

    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40

  58. #58
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    ehh, that's going to be rough for me.

    I need to delete a cog and offset the cassette outboard in order for the chain to clear the tire on my fatbike. I was counting on the 17 & 19 replacement with 18 to accomplish this... its going to make for some big jumps otherwise...
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    That seems to be a preproduction unit or a mule. That 9 T gap is too much even for low gears.

    On the other hand, shimano promised ~450g for the unit, and having a sensible ratios at that spread and weight limit might be a problem.

    Altho I imiagine 11-46 should be:

    11-13-15-17-20-23-26-30-35-40-46

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    Quote Originally Posted by uzurpator View Post
    That seems to be a preproduction unit or a mule. That 9 T gap is too much even for low gears.

    On the other hand, shimano promised ~450g for the unit, and having a sensible ratios at that spread and weight limit might be a problem.

    Altho I imiagine 11-46 should be:

    11-13-15-17-20-23-26-30-35-40-46
    When it was first announced Padraig from Red Kite Prayer said something on their Paceline podcast about Shimano saying the 46 was going to be set up as a bail-out gear - which I assume means along the lines of the old megarange freewheels:


    In which case, 37-46 isn't unreasonable.

    Also, word on the street is that the SRAM Eagle cassette is just going to tack the 50T onto the existing 10-42, so they're looking at a 8t jump there.

  62. #62
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    8T gap from 42 to 50 is less of an issue thet 9T gap from 37 to 46 - 19% to 25%, respectively.

    Anyhow - such setup kills my will to get that thing as it is useless for what I was planning to do.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by bopApocalypse View Post
    When it was first announced Padraig from Red Kite Prayer said something on their Paceline podcast about Shimano saying the 46 was going to be set up as a bail-out gear - which I assume means along the lines of the old megarange freewheels:


    In which case, 37-46 isn't unreasonable.

    Also, word on the street is that the SRAM Eagle cassette is just going to tack the 50T onto the existing 10-42, so they're looking at a 8t jump there.
    LOL, I got my 34-26 1-2 cluster for my custom 6-speed setup from an old Megarange. Apparently I'm as obsolete as my drivetrain parts.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post
    Here vital is saying the last jump is 37-46... WTF! are they replacing the 42 by 46?
    That's a 24% jump, a true granny/ bailout gear. Kind of an odd move for Shimano, this is the sort of thing we're used to seeing from after market companies. Certainly going to be hard to make a range extender for this!

    I kind of like it.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ogre View Post
    That's a 24% jump, a true granny/ bailout gear. Kind of an odd move for Shimano, this is the sort of thing we're used to seeing from after market companies. Certainly going to be hard to make a range extender for this!

    I kind of like it.
    I really want a 40-46, the 37-46 doesn't get you much in order to run a 34 or 36 ring upfront if you have to use the 37 cog most of the time! I don't wanna be bailing out all the time :-)

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post
    I really want a 40-46, the 37-46 doesn't get you much in order to run a 34 or 36 ring upfront if you have to use the 37 cog most of the time! I don't wanna be bailing out all the time :-)
    Its funny, I run a 34t chainring with a SRAM 10-44t cassette (w/ range extender cog). I've been debating switching to a 32 tooth cassette because I find I'm up in the 44t more than I'd like and don't use the 10t much at all.

    Why do you want a 34 or 36t ring? Are you spinning out your 11t that often?

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    Not much, but looks to me that this would be great, used to have 24/36 and almost never used the 36 cog, now running 32/42 and using it quite a bit seems my optimal climbing ratio is ~0.8 and the 32/37 is too hard for me a lot of times!

    if I get 40-46 I can use the 40 as my regular and hopefully bump to 34 by mid season and retire my 30 early season ring!

    what's the second cog on your 10-44?

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post
    Not much, but looks to me that this would be great, used to have 24/36 and almost never used the 36 cog, now running 32/42 and using it quite a bit seems my optimal climbing ratio is ~0.8 and the 32/37 is too hard for me a lot of times!

    if I get 40-46 I can use the 40 as my regular and hopefully bump to 34 by mid season and retire my 30 early season ring!

    what's the second cog on your 10-44?
    36t, so there is an 8 tooth gap, not quite as big a gap as the 37-46t gap Shimano plans—22% as opposed to Shimano's 24%.

    Sounds like you'll have plenty of time to sort this out. I'd suggest sticking with 32t unless you are absolutely sure it's hurting your riding.

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    Anyone know the actual gears in this 11-46?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Averbuks View Post
    Anyone know the actual gears in this 11-46?
    Model Number CS-M8000
    Series SHIMANO DEORE XT
    Number of Sprockets 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40, 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-42, 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-46
    Option 1 11-40T/11-42T/11-46T

    From shimano xt product site..

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lonecrow View Post
    Model Number CS-M8000
    Series SHIMANO DEORE XT
    Number of Sprockets 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40, 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-42, 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-37-46
    Option 1 11-40T/11-42T/11-46T

    From shimano xt product site..
    So they just replaced the biggest cog on the 11-42. Not ideal but handy if you need a bailout gear. I'm thinking about getting one just for when I go out of town to places with long and/or steep climbs. Don't think I need it otherwise.

  72. #72
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    Shimano 11-46 cassette: is it going to happen?-sunrace-mx8-11-46.jpg
    SunRace kicks again with a 11-46T 11s cassette at great price, good weight and available in stores now; even before that Shimano promised one and with better steep climbs.
    SunRace MX8 11s
    11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 46 471g

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by OscarAM View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Sunrace-MX8-11-46.jpg 
Views:	2459 
Size:	284.3 KB 
ID:	1085238
    SunRace kicks again with a 11-46T 11s cassette at great price, good weight and available in stores now; even before that Shimano promised one and with better steep climbs.
    SunRace MX8 11s
    11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 46 471g
    looks more like
    13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 46, 11
    to me.

    That jump from 46 -> 11 at the low end will surely bust my legs should I ever accidentally shift into that "suicide cog"

  74. #74
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    Suicide cog! lol

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