Nitrile treated chain- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Nitrile treated chain

    What is the big deal with nitrile chain?

    Is it more reliable than regular chain?

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  2. #2
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    Can you provide a link? Iíve only ever heard of motorcycle chains using nitrile o-rings to lock in grease thatís been vacuum injected into the joint. Or is there some lubricant with a triple bonded carbon nitrogen group dangling off one of the hydrocarbons used in formulation? Iím not really sure what benefit his would provide lubrication-wise?
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  3. #3
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    motorcycle / industrial only afaik

    if a bicycle version existed... too much weight and drag
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  4. #4
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    Nitrile, like what medical gloves are made of? No idea bro.

    I like the idea of a ferric nitrocarburized chain. It's cheap and non shape distorting.

  5. #5
    BOOM goes the dynamite!
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    Just get nitrile gloves from Harbor Frieght. Cut them into strips the exact width of your chain rollers and glue one around each of the rollers. Takes a lot of time, but for like 35 seconds your chain will be quiet like a ninja.

  6. #6
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    Do you mean something like this: X9L Ti Nitride - KMC Chain

    I recently bought one (it was marked down lower than a run of the mill chain) but I haven't used it yet.

  7. #7
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    Since chains are wear items and need to be replaced often I would be hard pressed to spend extra money on chains.

    I assume whatever treatment is meant to lower friction, but at an increased cost. Most likely it's just a value adder that they can use on their high end chains as another way of justifying the extra cost to the consumer.

    I'm sure on a perfectly clean new chain there is a reduction in friction, as to how much, I'd assume it would be difficult to quantify. As the chain and coating is worn down that benefit will also be reduced.

    I'd say spend your money on a chain gauge & a reasonably priced mid range chain & replace when it's worn. That will provide you with better shifting & longer drive train life than an expensive chain that you may falsely assume will last longer than a less expensive one.
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  8. #8
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    All coatings ( TiN, TiAlN, ceramics, slick oils, paints, anodization, nickel plating etc ) on chains, cogs and brake rotors are for aesthetics and corrosion resistance. They provide _zero_ performance benefits.

    Average thickness of those coats, (excl paints ) is measured in microns, during average life a cog will see milimetres of material taken off. So whatever those things add, it lasts one ride - once it wears off, bare metal is exposed and filed away as per usual.

  9. #9
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    any decent chain is already coated, I trust shimano here way further than some gimmick
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  10. #10
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzurpator View Post
    All coatings ( TiN, TiAlN, ceramics, slick oils, paints, anodization, nickel plating etc ) on chains, cogs and brake rotors are for aesthetics and corrosion resistance. They provide _zero_ performance benefits.

    Average thickness of those coats, (excl paints ) is measured in microns, during average life a cog will see milimetres of material taken off. So whatever those things add, it lasts one ride - once it wears off, bare metal is exposed and filed away as per usual.
    this
    looks cool but nothing super special either

    the grit a chain picks up is often tougher than the coating on the chain at nanoscales. studies have shown 105Gpa hardness at the nanoscale (nanoindentation) with some of the particles in ordinary sand. nitride coatings are considered hard at 55Gpa. A superhard material is a material with a hardness value exceeding 40 gigapascals.

    larger pieces of sand (silica/quartz/other minerals) have much lower GPa at greater scales, but right at the very point of pressure they can push the nitride apart.

    it's gonna wear out...slower than an 'ordinary' chain but wear out nonetheless. and you still gotta lube it so it runs with little friction.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by narcoleptic View Post
    Do you mean something like this: X9L Ti Nitride - KMC Chain

    I recently bought one (it was marked down lower than a run of the mill chain) but I haven't used it yet.
    yeah. this is the chain. SRAM has similar type of chain for its XX! group set.
    Is it better than regular Shimano chain?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzurpator View Post
    All coatings ( TiN, TiAlN, ceramics, slick oils, paints, anodization, nickel plating etc ) on chains, cogs and brake rotors are for aesthetics and corrosion resistance. They provide _zero_ performance benefits.

    Average thickness of those coats, (excl paints ) is measured in microns, during average life a cog will see milimetres of material taken off. So whatever those things add, it lasts one ride - once it wears off, bare metal is exposed and filed away as per usual.
    "All coatings" is not entirely true, most flashy finishes are primarily for looks but deeper down higher end chains often have something like hard chrome applied which is essentially an extra thick chromium plating which does seem to extend chain life since it doesn't rapidly get wiped off the surface. SRAM specifically lists this as a feature of its higher end chains. Shimano calls their process Chromizing which is apparently a somewhat different process with the similar end goal of surface hardening.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    yeah. this is the chain. SRAM has similar type of chain for its XX! group set.
    Is it better than regular Shimano chain?
    Nitriles and nitrides are very different compound ďfamiliesĒ with very different properties....

    Iíll be honest, Iíve read a number of your threads and posts while perusing the site and canít tell if your whole deal is an intentional and masterful farce (not meant to deceive but as some skillful sardonic social commentary), you drink a ton before posting, or youíre not in possession of all of your faculties. Iím not commenting to be mean, I just canít tell if Iím missing out on what is a realllllllllllly well played character or .... something else....
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  14. #14
    All fat, all the time.
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    Damnit Picard!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velodonata View Post
    "All coatings" is not entirely true, most flashy finishes are primarily for looks but deeper down higher end chains often have something like hard chrome applied which is essentially an extra thick chromium plating which does seem to extend chain life since it doesn't rapidly get wiped off the surface. SRAM specifically lists this as a feature of its higher end chains. Shimano calls their process Chromizing which is apparently a somewhat different process with the similar end goal of surface hardening.
    Kind of. But hard chrome plating is done to chain pins regardless of chain grade, so a moot point and plates are plated with decorative chrome or nickel for decorative purposes.

    Hard chromed chains still can't exceed the 0.03mm coat thickness provided by the process, which is approx 1/3rd of elongation that prompts chain replacement. I _guesstimate_ that hard chrome plated chains last a longer, but chains are made out of very hard steel anyways, so the improvement can't be all that significant.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzurpator View Post
    Kind of. But hard chrome plating is done to chain pins regardless of chain grade, so a moot point and plates are plated with decorative chrome or nickel for decorative purposes.

    Hard chromed chains still can't exceed the 0.03mm coat thickness provided by the process, which is approx 1/3rd of elongation that prompts chain replacement. I _guesstimate_ that hard chrome plated chains last a longer, but chains are made out of very hard steel anyways, so the improvement can't be all that significant.
    There is no strict limitation to 0.03mm for the hard chrome process, and using SRAM for example, they do not list the thickness of their process but they do limit it to only X01 and XX1 chains and it is applied to the rollers and inner plates which would mean stacking the coatings on to two of the primary wear components of the chain. I don't believe it is a coincidence that the X01 and XX1 chains are consistently reported to have better life than the lower level SRAM chains, this has been my own experience as well.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    it's gonna wear out...slower than an 'ordinary' chain but wear out nonetheless. and you still gotta lube it so it runs with little friction.
    Ti Nitride is legit. But is it worth the cost?

    Compare the KMC X11.93 to the X11 SL Gold here:

    https://bikerumor.com/2018/01/29/wip...lasts-longest/

    Maybe not quite apples-to-apples since the SL has milled side plates and hollow pins, but let's say it lasts twice as long.

    KMC changed their names and packaging recently, but I think this is the old X11.93 at 19.50 Euro and the old SL at 34.50 Euro... so maybe the bling marginally pays for itself?

    https://r2-bike.com/KMC-Chain-11-spe...118-Links-grey
    https://r2-bike.com/KMC-Chain-11-spe...inks-Ti-N-gold

    When I've done such estimations in the past, it seems to be about a wash and depends on your riding conditions.

    I personally run silver chains for corrosion resistance at sort of a middle cost point. They also seem to shed grim and clean up a little better IMHO. YMMV. I just ordered 2 for the parts bin.

    https://r2-bike.com/KMC-Chain-11-fac...8-Links-silver

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  18. #18
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    I have always had great luck with KMC bottom end chains XX.93 whatever....and I am not nice to my chains either. I did have one of the SL Ti blah blah chains and broke the ever living shit out of it in the dark in the middle of the woods. Last time I bought anything with SL in the title.

  19. #19
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    I don't see any need to go with exotic materials. 11-speed Shimano XTR chains are awesome- they last a long time and replacements play nice with other drive train components that continue on chugging for years.

    I tend to go with KMC in 9 and 10 speed chainage... they have tighter tolerances and last a good bit of time as well.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    any decent chain is already coated, I trust shimano here way further than some gimmick
    My Shimano chains will rust in rainwater if un-lubed. A nitrocarborizing treatment on stainless steel will withstand like a thousand hours of salt water spray without corroding. It isn't a coating, but a surface treatment.

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