Results 1 to 35 of 35
  1. #1
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,533

    Industry Nine gets Shimano micro spline freehub bodies

    Industry Nine just posted on Facebook that they've licensed the micro spline freehub bodies from Shimano and will be offering them for all current Torch hubs by the end of the year.

  2. #2
    always licking the glass
    Reputation: stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    1,440
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Industry Nine just posted on Facebook that they've licensed the micro spline freehub bodies from Shimano and will be offering them for all current Torch hubs by the end of the year.
    Thatís awesome to hear. Are they going to have retrofits available too?

    Iím hoping Hadley will have the ability to retrofit. I hate the idea that I canít reuse my wheels with a different driver.
    Guerrilla Gravity BAMF, Colorado Front Range
    Hadley hubs for sale

  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,533
    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Thatís awesome to hear. Are they going to have retrofits available too?

    Iím hoping Hadley will have the ability to retrofit. I hate the idea that I canít reuse my wheels with a different driver.
    All the post says is the freehub bodies will be available for "all current torch hubs"

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    672
    It's going to be interesting to see the long-term durability of the new Shimano system. Apparently, Industry Nine is already convinced. Guys will be badmouthing them very quickly on MTBR if they aren't reliable. Have any of their road hubs run the micro spline system?
    I still have two old low POE Shimano hubs. One Dura-Ace 7700 on one of my old road bikes. I also have an old XTR 950 hub on an ancient mountain bike that I keep around for my dad to ride. I wish that my DT Swiss hub with 54 tooth ratchets was even half as quiet as either one of those hubs. I may try the new Shimano system once it has proven reliability.

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,533
    Quote Originally Posted by TTTURNER View Post
    It's going to be interesting to see the long-term durability of the new Shimano system. Apparently, Industry Nine is already convinced. Guys will be badmouthing them very quickly on MTBR if they aren't reliable. Have any of their road hubs run the micro spline system?
    I still have two old low POE Shimano hubs. One Dura-Ace 7700 on one of my old road bikes. I also have an old XTR 950 hub on an ancient mountain bike that I keep around for my dad to ride. I wish that my DT Swiss hub with 54 tooth ratchets was even half as quiet as either one of those hubs. I may try the new Shimano system once it has proven reliability.
    I don't think I9 will be getting Shimano's silent treatment. Pretty sure Shimano is keeping that to themselves. It's just the new spline cassette interface that Shimano is licensing out (first non-Shimano was DT Swiss), so more folks can start buying their 12spd drivetrains.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    194
    But apparently shimano is being very tight about who they license it to. Chris King was commenting on instagram today that shimano won't let them license it.

    Seems kind of dumb to me, i'd figure you want as many manufacturers as you can to be able to compete with SRAM.

  7. #7
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,715
    Licensed to DT as part of their design agreement.
    Licensed to I9 because their loud hubs aren't in Shimano's market segment.

    White Industries - we don't gaf, engineered a work around. heehee

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: aliikane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,267
    Having so many freehub body standards is a bummer. Just makes drivetrains that much more complicated and expensive.

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,533
    Quote Originally Posted by aliikane View Post
    Having so many freehub body standards is a bummer. Just makes drivetrains that much more complicated and expensive.
    Agreed.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velodonata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    164
    Quote Originally Posted by aliikane View Post
    Having so many freehub body standards is a bummer. Just makes drivetrains that much more complicated and expensive.
    There are always transition pains, however it was needed, there was a true hole in the market waiting for this. It is a clearly superior alternative to XD. Now Shimano just needs to open it up wide and get it out there, when it becomes the true successor to HG it will eventually make things simpler and cheaper.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,780
    This is good news to me. I have I9 hubs with an XD driver running XX1 11-speed. I was considering getting a new XTR shifter and derailleur and using a SRAM 12-speed cassette, but if I can convert to micro-spline I'll probably go with the XTR cassette to ensure I get the best shifting performance.

  12. #12
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,715
    Quote Originally Posted by aliikane View Post
    Having so many freehub body standards is a bummer. Just makes drivetrains that much more complicated and expensive.
    We're going from two to three, a 50% increase. Should I anticipate my next XT 12 speed drivetrain to be 50% more expensive and complicated?

  13. #13
    BOOM goes the dynamite!
    Reputation: noapathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,819
    Quote Originally Posted by aliikane View Post
    Having so many freehub body standards is a bummer. Just makes drivetrains that much more complicated and expensive.
    I hate things that are better. Why can't we stick to 7 speed freewheels?

  14. #14
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,533
    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    We're going from two to three, a 50% increase. Should I anticipate my next XT 12 speed drivetrain to be 50% more expensive and complicated?
    You forget (or maybe didn't know because it's road stuff) that Campagnolo has had its own freehub body for forever.

    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    I hate things that are better. Why can't we stick to 7 speed freewheels?
    It's annoying because if you want to switch cassette brands, you need a different freehub body. Twas annoying enough at 11spd with the introduction of xD. If I want to use different cassettes to play around with gearing steps, or cost, some cassette options require factoring in the cost of a new freehub body. Now with microspline, 12spd cassettes have even less flexibility without factoring in the cost of a new freehub body. And until Shimano opens it up, some people would have to buy entirely new wheelsets to be able to consider Shimano 12spd. I, for example, cannot even consider Shimano 12spd until Hope gets access to the microspline freehub body. Not that I really want to, tbh. 11spd is enough range for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Velodonata View Post
    There are always transition pains, however it was needed, there was a true hole in the market waiting for this. It is a clearly superior alternative to XD. Now Shimano just needs to open it up wide and get it out there, when it becomes the true successor to HG it will eventually make things simpler and cheaper.
    I'm curious why it's "clearly superior" to xD? Serious question. The old Shimano HG freehub body certainly has its limitations/problems, at least some of which are addressed with microspline. Agree that Shimano needs to open it up and get it out there, though. The more tightly they hold onto that cassette spline interface, the fewer people will use it, and the slower the adoption. Especially once 12spd drivetrains hit XT and SLX level price points. People are going to buy other drivetrains if they have to buy new wheelsets to use Shimano's stuff (and can avoid a new wheelset by buying something else).

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5,210
    I am spec'ing parts for a new build this winter, and right now I have my eye on Chris Kings w/ XD driver. But the cheapest XD f#cking cassette from Sram is $200, and with my history of not playing nice with cassettes I have a hard time paying that much. I feel like if I get a new hub with Shimano HG I will be buying back into old tech.

    If I'm spending money on a new build I feel compelled to go 12 speed, but some of the prices are just insane.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,139
    ^ I'd be curious to know how it's "superior" to XD as well?
    The entire XD cassette is driven by the splines on the largest cog effectively moving all torque as inboard as possible. For a big guy that blows up drive side bearings this has seemingly made a big difference in drive side bearing life. There are other advantages to XD as well.

    Micro spline seems basically the same old shimano interface but with much (needed) more purchase. Anybody with marred shimano freehubs probably wanted an improvement here 20+ years ago. With that I'd wager floating cogs with still dig in.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  17. #17
    BOOM goes the dynamite!
    Reputation: noapathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,819
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You forget (or maybe didn't know because it's road stuff) that Campagnolo has had its own freehub body for forever.



    It's annoying because if you want to switch cassette brands, you need a different freehub body. Twas annoying enough at 11spd with the introduction of xD. If I want to use different cassettes to play around with gearing steps, or cost, some cassette options require factoring in the cost of a new freehub body. Now with microspline, 12spd cassettes have even less flexibility without factoring in the cost of a new freehub body. And until Shimano opens it up, some people would have to buy entirely new wheelsets to be able to consider Shimano 12spd. I, for example, cannot even consider Shimano 12spd until Hope gets access to the microspline freehub body. Not that I really want to, tbh. 11spd is enough range for me.



    I'm curious why it's "clearly superior" to xD? Serious question. The old Shimano HG freehub body certainly has its limitations/problems, at least some of which are addressed with microspline. Agree that Shimano needs to open it up and get it out there, though. The more tightly they hold onto that cassette spline interface, the fewer people will use it, and the slower the adoption. Especially once 12spd drivetrains hit XT and SLX level price points. People are going to buy other drivetrains if they have to buy new wheelsets to use Shimano's stuff (and can avoid a new wheelset by buying something else).
    Didn't Hope make their own freehub at one point? I may be confusing it with BB...now that's a standards clusterf*ck.

    Sunrace if you want 12spd now. I'm sure they're busily working on a version to fit this as well. I'm perfectly happy on 10spd until my stuff wears out, so no rush here either.

    Superior to xD as soon as the XT launches and we don't have to pay $100+ for a cassette. Otherwise, options and competition are good.

  18. #18
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,533
    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Didn't Hope make their own freehub at one point? I may be confusing it with BB...now that's a standards clusterf*ck.

    Sunrace if you want 12spd now. I'm sure they're busily working on a version to fit this as well. I'm perfectly happy on 10spd until my stuff wears out, so no rush here either.

    Superior to xD as soon as the XT launches and we don't have to pay $100+ for a cassette. Otherwise, options and competition are good.
    Yeah, hope does their own, too. Forgot that.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velodonata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    164
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    ^ I'd be curious to know how it's "superior" to XD as well?
    The entire XD cassette is driven by the splines on the largest cog effectively moving all torque as inboard as possible. For a big guy that blows up drive side bearings this has seemingly made a big difference in drive side bearing life. There are other advantages to XD as well.

    Micro spline seems basically the same old shimano interface but with much (needed) more purchase. Anybody with marred shimano freehubs probably wanted an improvement here 20+ years ago. With that I'd wager floating cogs with still dig in.
    MicroSpline is superior because it is simpler and more versatile. Just an evolution of a time tested industry standard. Any cassette construction style can work well on a basic fully splined freehub body. Internally threaded at the end for a simple traditional lockring. The cassette is supported from end to end.

    XD sucks because it has none of those characteristics, it has external threads down by the base, and only has splines at the base. There is no support for the small cogs, and no way to use a single basic lockring. So the only cassette style that really works well is the freakshow SRAM style, and they can be difficult for some people to install and tricky to torque correctly. Aftermarket cassettes designed for XD are either variations of SRAM knockoffs or use some overly complicated design to work. Just look at the e13 cassettes. Nobody would make anything for XD if they had a choice, but the 10t cog is too important to a wide range 1x cassette. SRAM just took a stupid path to get there and Shimano took their sweet time about releasing a decent one.

    I believe you are mistaken about the XD design contributing to better bearing life, the torque is directed to the freehub body on either design, but the cassette structure itself has to carry the torque on the small cogs with XD. The freehub body can support the entire cassette with MicroSpline. I expect that you just found a hub with better bearings when you went to XD.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,139
    Quote Originally Posted by Velodonata View Post
    the cassette structure itself has to carry the torque on the small cogs with XD.
    That is essentially my point.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velodonata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    164
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    That is essentially my point.
    But it's not a good thing, and should have nothing to do with bearing life on a well designed hub. The torque is transmitted to the freehub body drive either way.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,139
    Quote Originally Posted by Velodonata View Post
    But it's not a good thing, and should have nothing to do with bearing life on a well designed hub. The torque is transmitted to the freehub body drive either way.
    The freehub body rides seperate from the hub shell. The further you move torque away from the hub shell the more leverage there is on the drive side hub shell bearing. The sram cassette overcomes this leverage by "driving" all the torque through the largest cog which moves it as inboard as possible. Yes there is some load spread out over the freehub body either way, but srams design cleverly brings a lot of that force inboard toward the hub shell. A floating 10 tooth cog will exert more leverage on the drive side bearing vs srams single unit design. There's no way around that.

    On a drive ring hub like DT swiss it keeps those forces close to the axle so maybe a moot point. Paw style hubs like I9 that drive further away from the axle, those forces add up and are naturally distributed to the drive side bearing. This is simply why drive side bearings wear at a rate of 4/1 to brake side bearings, they take more load from pedaling.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velodonata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    164
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    The freehub body rides seperate from the hub shell. The further you move torque away from the hub shell the more leverage there is on the drive side hub shell bearing. The sram cassette overcomes this leverage by "driving" all the torque through the largest cog which moves it as inboard as possible. Yes there is some load spread out over the freehub body either way, but srams design cleverly brings a lot of that force inboard toward the hub shell. A floating 10 tooth cog will exert more leverage on the drive side bearing vs srams single unit design. There's no way around that.

    On a drive ring hub like DT swiss it keeps those forces close to the axle so maybe a moot point. Paw style hubs like I9 that drive further away from the axle, those forces add up and are naturally distributed to the drive side bearing. This is simply why drive side bearings wear at a rate of 4/1 to brake side bearings, they take more load from pedaling.
    An installed cassette and the freehub body, with either system, effectively becomes a solid unit and the torque doesn't care what either piece looks like as an individual component before installation. The flow of torque is the same to the rest of the hub and the bearings. The drive side bearings have the same distribution of forces on them with either design. The torque loads on the inside of the freehub body and the rest of the hub don't change, the method of connecting the cogs to the outside of a solid freehub body are irrelevant to what goes on inside and behind it.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    3,139
    Quote Originally Posted by Velodonata View Post
    An installed cassette and the freehub body, with either system, effectively becomes a solid unit and the torque doesn't care what either piece looks like as an individual component before installation. The flow of torque is the same to the rest of the hub and the bearings. The drive side bearings have the same distribution of forces on them with either design. The torque loads on the inside of the freehub body and the rest of the hub don't change, the method of connecting the cogs to the outside of a solid freehub body are irrelevant to what goes on inside and behind it.
    30+ years of dealing with hub and freehub bearings tells me otherwise. I'd say the same for drive side bb bearings, they always creek/wear first due to the extra load. Anyway we're beginning to beat this horse dead, we'll have to agree to disagree, I'm gonna leave it there.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Velodonata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    164
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    30+ years of dealing with hub and freehub bearings tells me otherwise. I'd say the same for drive side bb bearings, they always creek/wear first due to the extra load. Anyway we're beginning to beat this horse dead, we'll have to agree to disagree, I'm gonna leave it there.
    My experience with running both HG and XD on the same hubs is that there is no appreciable difference in bearing load or life between them, the overall design and quality of the hub is the significant factor. I don't disagree that the bearings on the drive side of the bike see more load, we can disagree on the merits or lack thereof to the XD design.

  26. #26
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,715
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You forget (or maybe didn't know because it's road stuff) that Campagnolo has had its own freehub body for forever.
    I know you desperately want to be the smart guy with the answers, but Campy doesn't make mountain bike groupsets.

  27. #27
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,533
    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    I know you desperately want to be the smart guy with the answers, but Campy doesn't make mountain bike groupsets.
    So? I mentioned that. Still a different freehub. Hope makes one. Shimano even had another design I forgot about, too. Probably more I am missing.

    Note how I am not afraid to admit when I don't have an answer. Even in this thread.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  28. #28
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,715
    Yes Harry, you are the smartest kid here and the humblest. *pats harry on the head*. Now go outside and play.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    79
    Anyone heard about Hope hubs? Will we see Hope get micro spline tech?

  30. #30
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,214
    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    Thatís awesome to hear. Are they going to have retrofits available too?

    Iím hoping Hadley will have the ability to retrofit. I hate the idea that I canít reuse my wheels with a different driver.
    I wouldnít hold my breath. Iíve been a strong supporter of Hadley, I *LOVE* my hubs, but when they failed to offer a Ďboostinator kití even after like every other brand did it, I see they arenít interested in keepin up with new standards. It would be SO easy for Hadley, because of the axle conversion kits. Add 5mm to each side of the 15x100 (or 12x142) end caps and machine a 5mm disc spacer. MRP does it, WolfTooth does it, about a dozen eBay vendors do it....

    As much as I Ďfanboií Hadley hubs, my next wheelbuild wonít be Hadley.
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  31. #31
    Biking Like Crazy!
    Reputation: blcman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,284
    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    I wouldnít hold my breath. Iíve been a strong supporter of Hadley, I *LOVE* my hubs, but when they failed to offer a Ďboostinator kití even after like every other brand did it, I see they arenít interested in keepin up with new standards. It would be SO easy for Hadley, because of the axle conversion kits. Add 5mm to each side of the 15x100 (or 12x142) end caps and machine a 5mm disc spacer. MRP does it, WolfTooth does it, about a dozen eBay vendors do it....

    As much as I Ďfanboií Hadley hubs, my next wheelbuild wonít be Hadley.
    Hadley does offer a boost conversion kit for the rear at least. Check Balle Racing for it. You get a longer axle with the disk brake spacer.
    2017 Banshee Prime
    2017 Niner Rip 9 RDO Pushed Version!
    2015 Ibis HD3 w/ Push ASC3
    2014 Knolly Podium

  32. #32
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    8,994
    I have a nice set of I9 wheels; it's going to be expensive for me to convert to Shimano 12 speed.

    Having destroyed aluminum freehub bodies, I recently upgraded my I9 FH body to steel -- to the tune of $200. Ouch. Now in order to get Shimano's 12 speed, I'll have to shell out for yet another new one in MicroSpline trim. Sounds like a complaint, doesn't it? It isn't. I like Shimano's new MicroSpline design. I believe it's far superior to SRAM's XD. And I MUST have 12 speed!

    Right.

    But wait. I'd love a silent hub, too. So maybe rather than buy another expensive freehub body, I'll just save my pennies until I can get a whole new wheel built around Shimano's Sylence hub. Yeah, that's the ticket.

    Oh, and then I'll have to shell for a new shifter and derailleur. Yikes. Maybe 11 speed isn't so bad after all. 12 speed would only give me one more tooth at either end.
    =sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  33. #33
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,214
    Quote Originally Posted by blcman View Post
    Hadley does offer a boost conversion kit for the rear at least. Check Balle Racing for it. You get a longer axle with the disk brake spacer.
    Hot diggity dog.

    I see youíre right. Iíve used Balle Racing for all my Hadley parts since I got the hubs. I didnít look for a rear kit because my frame is 12x142. I see They do make the boostinator kit for the front but I didnít recognize it, either it doesnít come with a disc spacer or it isnít pictured.
    Unfortunately it shows out of stock right now. Gonna keep a close watch on this.
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,248
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    I have a nice set of I9 wheels; it's going to be expensive for me to convert to Shimano 12 speed.

    Having destroyed aluminum freehub bodies, I recently upgraded my I9 FH body to steel -- to the tune of $200. Ouch. Now in order to get Shimano's 12 speed, I'll have to shell out for yet another new one in MicroSpline trim. Sounds like a complaint, doesn't it? It isn't. I like Shimano's new MicroSpline design. I believe it's far superior to SRAM's XD. And I MUST have 12 speed!

    Right.

    But wait. I'd love a silent hub, too. So maybe rather than buy another expensive freehub body, I'll just save my pennies until I can get a whole new wheel built around Shimano's Sylence hub. Yeah, that's the ticket.

    Oh, and then I'll have to shell for a new shifter and derailleur. Yikes. Maybe 11 speed isn't so bad after all. 12 speed would only give me one more tooth at either end.
    =sParty
    You can already[ish]. Shimano is producing an XTR hub, and a second, non-series hub at a significant cost reduction (no weight saving machining, less expensive materials, less expensive finish, etc...).

    I for one hope that Shimano waits this out. We already lost a superior body when the roadies cried foul that they would have to replace their wheels. (Why is it always "have to replace our wheels", by the way? That's absurd, put a new hub in it.)

  35. #35
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    23,533
    I'm definitely going to be late to the 12spd game. Chainline for 11spd is already not great. 1x10 is better, but range suffers.

    I am building a new hardtail and am trying to decide which drivetrain to use. I might use one of Sunrace's wide range 10spd cassettes (I have a couple of their 11spd wide range cassettes on other bikes and they shift/wear well, albeit they're a little porky) because I have some unused 10spd bits in my parts box.

    Might stay 11spd and put a chi chi Garbaruk cassette on. I don't use the full range of the 11-46 I use now, so I don't need more range. Just need to keep the low end gearing.

    I MIGHT get the new XTR and just get the 11spd bits. The way it sounds is that the 11spd 10-45 cassette will wind up with a better chainline in the big cog (even though Shimano doesn't say this in its marketing), because the cassette is the same as the 12spd, but it omits the 51t cog.

    Definitely putting Industry Nine wheels on this bike, though, so of course, all of my options would require a different freehub body, and considering the cost of a new one to change between types, I'd rather just buy the one I'll stay with right away. The XTR option will certainly cost more, and therefore mean it'll take longer to get the bike built. Going 10spd with sunrace will be the budget option.

Similar Threads

  1. Replacement Freehub bodies for Shimano Hubs
    By tehllama in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-15-2015, 03:30 PM
  2. SRAM PG-990 vs PG-980 - which is harder on freehub bodies?
    By LCW in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-11-2013, 02:11 AM
  3. Replies: 38
    Last Post: 06-19-2012, 02:38 PM
  4. Industry Nine freehub lube?
    By Johnny K in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-19-2012, 01:50 PM
  5. How wide are freehub bodies?
    By sasquatch rides a SS in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-26-2011, 05:25 AM

Members who have read this thread: 200

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.