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  1. #1
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    Convert 2x10 to 1x10

    I am thinking of converting my 2x10 to 1x10.

    Current setup:
    Frame: Nomad carbon
    (1) RD: XTR long cage
    (2) Chain guide: MRP LRP
    (3) Chainring: 32-24T
    (4) Cogs(CS-M771-10): 11-36T (36/32/28/24/21/19/17/15/13/11)

    I like aggressive ride and do lots of climb too.
    What is your recommendation on the most ideal 1x10 setup?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris9888 View Post
    I am thinking of converting my 2x10 to 1x10.

    Current setup:
    Frame: Nomad carbon
    (1) RD: XTR long cage
    (2) Chain guide: MRP LRP
    (3) Chainring: 32-24T
    (4) Cogs(CS-M771-10): 11-36T (36/32/28/24/21/19/17/15/13/11)

    I like aggressive ride and do lots of climb too.
    What is your recommendation on the most ideal 1x10 setup?
    Easy peaky just remove your granny, fd and front shifter. Measure your rear chainline and your front one and see how much you need to shim in your chainring.

    Next you can always sell and buy a Shadow plus short cage rd and check if you could use a dedicated single ring chain guide.

    Hardest part might only be to get the right chainline in the front. Then you can always see if you'd like a bigger or smaller chainring.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Easy peaky just remove your granny, fd and front shifter. Measure your rear chainline and your front one and see how much you need to shim in your chainring.

    Next you can always sell and buy a Shadow plus short cage rd and check if you could use a dedicated single ring chain guide.

    Hardest part might only be to get the right chainline in the front. Then you can always see if you'd like a bigger or smaller chainring.
    Thanks David. Will give it a shot on your recommendation. The challenge is to identify the right chainring that suit my ride, was thinking of 30T or 28T as we have heap of climb here. Maybe I should stick with 32T and see how it goes. Thanks bro

  4. #4
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    Better stick with your current 32 and see how it goes. Hard to tell already if you'll need bigger or smaller.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Better stick with your current 32 and see how it goes. Hard to tell already if you'll need bigger or smaller.
    You are right.

  6. #6
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    And honestly with a 11-36 already, you'll be spinning high on the 32-32 combo. You might want to change your cassette for a 11-32 then and save some weight.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    And honestly with a 11-36 already, you'll be spinning high on the 32-32 combo. You might want to change your cassette for a 11-32 then and save some weight.
    That is a good idea. That means I can run Saint SS 9sp on my rear?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris9888 View Post
    That is a good idea. That means I can run Saint SS 9sp on my rear?
    Well you need a 9 speed shifter and cassette/chain to run a 9 speed rd. If you already have a 10 speed setup, I'd go for the 10 speed Saint instead

    Like this one :
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Convert 2x10 to 1x10-2012_shimano_saint_rd-m820_10-speed_shadow_design_mtb_rear_derailleur_ss_top_normal.jpg  

    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Well you need a 9 speed shifter and cassette/chain to run a 9 speed rd. If you already have a 10 speed setup, I'd go for the 10 speed Saint instead

    Like this one :
    Poisoned!

  10. #10
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    Managed to convert 2x10 to 1x10 in less than an hour.

    BEFORE


    Three components removed: (1) Granny ring (2) Front Derailleur (3) Shifter.


    AFTER

  11. #11
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    The new 1x10 setup failed the first test ride. Did a few hop and the chain dropped inward. The test result proved that the dual chain guide will not work on single ring. Sigh...need to get a single chain guide soonest.

  12. #12
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    Sounds like you also need to shim your chainring inboard to get it centered with your cassette. And then a dedicated single ring guide would be great, even more since it's a DH bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by david c View Post
    sounds like you also need to shim your chainring inboard to get it centered with your cassette. And then a dedicated single ring guide would be great, even more since it's a dh bike.
    +1!

  14. #14
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    To know your chainline, you need to measure the distance between the inside of your rear right drop-out to the middle of the middle cog of your cassette. Then take your rear spacing divided by 2 and substrac the previous measure from it to know your rear chainline.

    Let's say you have a rear 150mm axle :

    150mm/2=75mm

    And the measure you got from drop-out to middle cog is 25mm

    75mm-25mm=50mm

    So your rear chainline is 50mm.

    Then using a flat ruler, measure the distance between the middle of your chainring to the middle of the seat tube/frame. This will give you your current front chainline. Let's say you get 52.5mm.

    Now you need to match either the rear to the front or front to the rear.

    If you want to match the front, then you'll need four 2.5mm chainring spacers to stick between your crank arm spider and chainring and maybe longer chainring bolts to accommodate the new setup.

    But if you want to match the rear, you will have to either shim your cassette with a 2.5mm cassette spacer or re-shim your hub to take 2.5mm worth of spacers/washers off the drive side and put them on the non-drive side. This will likely cause to set your rear rotor out of alignment and require to also shim either the rotor or caliper adaptor mount.

    A last option is also available. Depending on your current BB/crank setup, you could just get a shorter BB spindle length (cartridge BB) or shim the BB spindle to get the right chainline (outboard BB), refer to the crank techs documents to see how to.

    Regarding chainring spacers, there is two kind, the "regular" ones and the granny ones. The regular ones will have a ID of 10.5mm to fit standard chainring bolts while the granny ones will have a ID of 8.5mm to fit on a granny ring bolt.

    Widely available standard one goes from 0.1mm to 4.5mm. Granny goes up to 5mm.

    I had a very hard time finding some 5mm standard ones locally. I pretty much had to order online, but only bags of 20 were available. So I finally found some 4.5mm ones at my local bike co-op.

    They cost about $1~$2 each at the lbs.

    Pick your poison !
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  15. #15
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    Gawd...

    Some things you should know about 1x setups, especially with multiple cogs.

    1) Modern chain rings are designed to shift. Absent something stopping them from shifting, they'll do it, sooner or later. As you found out. A dedicated 1x ring would be a good future plan. The guide you're planning is also a necessity.

    2) You can't put anything smaller than 30t in the middle position, and that's a bit of a specialty item. If you decide 32t is too big for you, a steel chainring with the tooth count you want and designed to go in the granny position would be just the ticket. You might want a narrower bash guard so you could put the bash in the middle ring position and leave the outer open. It could give you a weird chainline to your smallest cogs, but hey, you made a choice to tinker. Specialites-TA makes a lot of weird sizes (although no steel) so you can find, say, a 30t granny from them. They also have just announced some rings to go with 10-speed drivetrains.

    For me, this is a somewhat pointless drivetrain unless you're ready to go to a singlespeed or 2x crank, and give up the granny position. The weight savings are pretty minimal as long as you're just replacing one thing with another - replace your relatively light FD with a marginally lighter guide, give up a relatively light granny ring, bfd. The shifter, okay, that's a bit more. Going to a crank that doesn't have a granny position and (hopefully) has a better chainline is going to make more of a difference.

    I like my 22/34, and used it a fair amount yesterday. Setting some PRs and cracking top ten on a leaderboard, no less. I don't know what your "lots of climb" is but while I could probably still fight my way up mine with a 32/36 low, I think my knees would explode. Maybe my heart too on some of the bigger places I ride. I also used 44/15 some yesterday. I'm pretty sure I could ditch my big ring and be content, but I <3 my granny, and I have a hardtail. I can't imagine being forced to climb out of the saddle on a squishy bike.

    If I were you, for now, I'd just get a chain watcher to stop the chain from dropping to the inside. It's a $9 part. Then ride some more, hit some of the biggest climbs I do, and see if I was okay with the 1x setup in terms of available low gears.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    To know your chainline, you need to measure the distance between the inside of your rear right drop-out to the middle of the middle cog of your cassette. Then take your rear spacing divided by 2 and substrac the previous measure from it to know your rear chainline.

    Let's say you have a rear 150mm axle :

    150mm/2=75mm

    And the measure you got from drop-out to middle cog is 25mm

    75mm-25mm=50mm

    So your rear chainline is 50mm.

    Then using a flat ruler, measure the distance between the middle of your chainring to the middle of the seat tube/frame. This will give you your current front chainline. Let's say you get 52.5mm.

    Now you need to match either the rear to the front or front to the rear.

    If you want to match the front, then you'll need four 2.5mm chainring spacers to stick between your crank arm spider and chainring and maybe longer chainring bolts to accommodate the new setup.

    But if you want to match the rear, you will have to either shim your cassette with a 2.5mm cassette spacer or re-shim your hub to take 2.5mm worth of spacers/washers off the drive side and put them on the non-drive side. This will likely cause to set your rear rotor out of alignment and require to also shim either the rotor or caliper adaptor mount.

    A last option is also available. Depending on your current BB/crank setup, you could just get a shorter BB spindle length (cartridge BB) or shim the BB spindle to get the right chainline (outboard BB), refer to the crank techs documents to see how to.

    Regarding chainring spacers, there is two kind, the "regular" ones and the granny ones. The regular ones will have a ID of 10.5mm to fit standard chainring bolts while the granny ones will have a ID of 8.5mm to fit on a granny ring bolt.

    Widely available standard one goes from 0.1mm to 4.5mm. Granny goes up to 5mm.

    I had a very hard time finding some 5mm standard ones locally. I pretty much had to order online, but only bags of 20 were available. So I finally found some 4.5mm ones at my local bike co-op.

    They cost about $1~$2 each at the lbs.

    Pick your poison !
    David, thanks for the 'education'.

    Will figure it out and hopefully get it done before this coming Sunday ride. Yes, I am queueing up for the poison

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Gawd...

    Some things you should know about 1x setups, especially with multiple cogs.

    1) Modern chain rings are designed to shift. Absent something stopping them from shifting, they'll do it, sooner or later. As you found out. A dedicated 1x ring would be a good future plan. The guide you're planning is also a necessity.

    2) You can't put anything smaller than 30t in the middle position, and that's a bit of a specialty item. If you decide 32t is too big for you, a steel chainring with the tooth count you want and designed to go in the granny position would be just the ticket. You might want a narrower bash guard so you could put the bash in the middle ring position and leave the outer open. It could give you a weird chainline to your smallest cogs, but hey, you made a choice to tinker. Specialites-TA makes a lot of weird sizes (although no steel) so you can find, say, a 30t granny from them. They also have just announced some rings to go with 10-speed drivetrains.

    For me, this is a somewhat pointless drivetrain unless you're ready to go to a singlespeed or 2x crank, and give up the granny position. The weight savings are pretty minimal as long as you're just replacing one thing with another - replace your relatively light FD with a marginally lighter guide, give up a relatively light granny ring, bfd. The shifter, okay, that's a bit more. Going to a crank that doesn't have a granny position and (hopefully) has a better chainline is going to make more of a difference.

    I like my 22/34, and used it a fair amount yesterday. Setting some PRs and cracking top ten on a leaderboard, no less. I don't know what your "lots of climb" is but while I could probably still fight my way up mine with a 32/36 low, I think my knees would explode. Maybe my heart too on some of the bigger places I ride. I also used 44/15 some yesterday. I'm pretty sure I could ditch my big ring and be content, but I <3 my granny, and I have a hardtail. I can't imagine being forced to climb out of the saddle on a squishy bike.

    If I were you, for now, I'd just get a chain watcher to stop the chain from dropping to the inside. It's a $9 part. Then ride some more, hit some of the biggest climbs I do, and see if I was okay with the 1x setup in terms of available low gears.
    Thanks for the insight. I am looking for a setup for both freeride and all-mountain. I thought a single chainring will be good but not too sure if my leg power can manage. The chain watcher seems to be a wise alternative for now. You definitely get me to rethink my plan

  18. #18
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    Make sure your chain is the correct length. Both big rings + 2 links with your suspension fully compressed. Excess chain flapping around will always throw itself. A short cage derailleur will keep the chain tight and reduce chatter too. A SS chainring will keep the chain on better as well with its taller teeth. I ride a Bashwich setup for AM/FR and haven't dropped a chain in 2 years.

  19. #19
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    OP, I'll be curious to hear what you think of your current single-ring setup after this weekend.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    Quote Originally Posted by chris9888 View Post
    Thanks for the insight. I am looking for a setup for both freeride and all-mountain. I thought a single chainring will be good but not too sure if my leg power can manage. The chain watcher seems to be a wise alternative for now. You definitely get me to rethink my plan
    David's right, you should change your rear cassette for an 11-32 for hill climbing, and it is generally great for all off-roading.
    It has several proper low gears that are missing from your current cassette.
    That will take a lot of pressure off your legs while climbing, no matter which front ring your using.
    For a 10 speed I like the look of the SRAM PG 1070 in 11-32

  21. #21
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    And honestly with a 11-36 already, you'll be spinning high on the 32-32 combo. You might want to change your cassette for a 11-32 then and save some weight.
    Out of curiosity, how do you know he will be spinning high with a 32-32 and wont need a 32-36 for climbing ever?

    im running 2x10 right now and will eventually go to 1x10 since every single track I ride, I can ride without going down to the granny, but with a 32 front ring, there are a few climbs which I must use the 36 on the rear cassette...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLMike View Post
    ..... with a 32 front ring, there are a few climbs which I must use the 36 on the rear cassette...
    Maybe I am dumb - I am a noob here so I wanted to ask...
    I thought the rear 32 gear was for high speed runs and the rear 11-12 gears for going up massive hills. What do you mean that you must use a 36 on the rear for some climbs?

  23. #23
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    You've got it backwards.

    Little chain rings and big cogs for climbing.

    Big chain rings and little cogs to go fast.

    To add to the confusing, when people talk about a big gear, they generally mean high gear ratio/lots of gear inches. That would be a little cog.

    There's a ton of overlap in most mountain bike drivetrains, which is why this kind of modification is becoming popular. Only the easiest three gears are unique to the smallest chain ring, with most drivetrain layouts, and only the highest two gears are unique to the largest chain ring on a triple. Which is to say that a 3x10 drivetrain really only has about fifteen unique ratios. A lot of people are fine giving up a couple of those. I don't think I need my highest two to have fun on my trails and be competitive in my races, so if (really more like when) I take too many teeth off my biggest chain ring for it to work anymore, I'm going to substitute a bash guard.

    The longer I ride XC, the more AM my bike gets. Although I do love my bar ends.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  24. #24
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    Damit!
    I know Iím new to all this but damit I hate being such a noob.
    Ok, that was a VIP lesson learned, thanks man!

    What I donít get though, is the reverse logic in the numbering scheme on front and rear.
    The front ď1 gear is the smallest but the rear #1 gear is the largest.
    Yes I know itís that they want me to associate #1 with easier peddling and low speeds and #3/10 with harder peddling and faster speeds.
    However, to me it really scrambles my thinking. lol
    I'm not crazy I swear. Lol

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLMike View Post
    Out of curiosity, how do you know he will be spinning high with a 32-32 and wont need a 32-36 for climbing ever?

    im running 2x10 right now and will eventually go to 1x10 since every single track I ride, I can ride without going down to the granny, but with a 32 front ring, there are a few climbs which I must use the 36 on the rear cassette...
    Coz I'm pushing a 40 pounds FR bike up the hills and when I get to use the 26, then 30 and finally 32, I just can't take it much longer to even think about spinning 1mph up to 36... And I highly doubt the OP will be riding flowy singletracks with a carbon DH bike

    And even more if you have to use a 32-36 ratio to climb a DH bike to do a DH run after, you probably be faster walking the bike and easier too.

    And I'm pretty sure he's already stronger than me and have a better climbing bike than I do. Plus he could get a 30t SS ring and be fine with a 11-32 or 11-34 cassette.

    But other than that I don't know
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  26. #26
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    On smooth stuff, like a fire road climb, I tend to bottom out a little below 6 mph with my 22/34. Keeping a granny on a bike like the Nomad makes a lot of sense to me if the owner rides somewhere with some vert and will be his own shuttle. Stick the bike in the lowest gear, lean forward, and just chill for the fire road climb. 1x sounds like a good setup to me for places without a ton of vert., or for bikes that get shuttled by a lift or a pickup truck or something to the top. There are some beasts of riders on the pro XC circuit doing 1x, but those guys have been known to install a smaller ring on some courses too.

    schristie - I don't know how the gears are numbered. I guess I'd count from the inside to the outside, so that higher-numbered gears are always faster. But my shifters don't have numbers, and people always use them differently, so I find it a lot clearer to say "small ring," "middle ring," "big ring," "smaller cogs," "bigger cogs," etc. Or "lower gear," "higher gear." Another thing to keep in mind is that not everybody's gearing is the same. My lowest gear is actually a bit lower than the OP's. If you have a 32t largest cog on your cassette, your lowest gear is higher than either mine or the OP's. My road bike's gearing doesn't go anywhere near as low as my MTB gearing, but it goes just a little higher and if I raced it, I'd probably set it up to go a lot higher. Etc.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  27. #27
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Coz I'm pushing a 40 pounds FR bike up the hills and when I get to use the 26, then 30 and finally 32, I just can't take it much longer to even think about spinning 1mph up to 36... And I highly doubt the OP will be riding flowy singletracks with a carbon DH bike

    And even more if you have to use a 32-36 ratio to climb a DH bike to do a DH run after, you probably be faster walking the bike and easier too.

    And I'm pretty sure he's already stronger than me and have a better climbing bike than I do. Plus he could get a 30t SS ring and be fine with a 11-32 or 11-34 cassette.

    But other than that I don't know
    I wouldnt call a nomad a downhill bike @ 160mm of suspension travel. 160mm is in line with many current "all mountain" bikes right now. And the OP does say "I like aggressive ride and do lots of climb too."

    I wouldnt suggest the OP to go and change his rear cassette if he already has one that currently works, especially without knowing his climbing ability and the trails he rides.

    For the OP, you already basically have the gearing of a 1x10 if you never use the granny on any of your trails. When you currently ride, if you keep it only on the 32T front ring, is the current rear cassette gearing adequate? Do you ever go onto the 36 tooth of the rear cassette? On the other spectrum, do you ever run out of gear going downhill? do you find the 32 front ring and the 11 tooth rear not fast enough for the downhill portions?

  28. #28
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    Thanks for all your valuable comments.

    I would not want to risk dropping my chain during Sunday ride. Installed a single chainguide (MRP mini G2 SL) last evening and the test ride was ok. The verdict will be out soon.


  29. #29
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    So how did you do ?
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  30. #30
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    David, the virgin ride with single chain ring was both hate and love...

    The test ride was done at one of my favorite trails, with some torturing climbs, discern downhill and berms. With only 32T single ring, I failed to climb two steep slopes which I usually cleared with granny ring. However, I was surprised to overcome one steep slope which I usually did it with granny. Though the climb has become more challenging, I think with regular training and proper technique I should be able to overcome the slopes in no time.

    The downhill was awesome. The single ring makes the bike lighter and stiffer. My confidence was greatly boosted, and I dived faster and hopped further in all opportunities. Not a single chain drop, except the slapping vibration and noise created by the chain due to the long XTR derailleur. A short SAINT derailleur would solve the problem.

    The rest of the ride was awesome, as I felt lighter and stiffer. Without the granny, I am no longer able to 'laze' as I wish, it kind of force me to keep going. I believe with time, I will use to single ring and will not want to go back to granny.

    One more thing, it is no advisable to use middle ring as single ring. To convert from dual chainring to single chainring, some riders may be tempted to use the middle chainring as single chainring. I would not advise you to do that for three main reasons: (1) The middle ring has added thickness around its teeth to allow chain to switchover to another gear. The additional thickness may narrow the clearance and cause the ring to rub against the plate of the chainguide; (2) Due to the additional thickness of the middle ring, the weigh is normally heavier than the dedicated single ring; and (3) The single chain ring was proven stiffer than the middle chain ring.


    I was using XT 32T middle ring as single chainring. The black color material around the ring was rubbing against the plate of the chainguide. Not an ideal solution. The weight of the middle ring is 55grams.


    The design of MRP 32T single chain ring is simple and clean. The thickness is smaller than the XT 32T middle ring. It only weigh 32grams.


    The photo shows the 1x10 setup that used XT 32T middle ring as single ring. Due to added thickness, the ring is rubbing against the plate of the chainguide. Adding BB spacer might not help as the chainline will be compromised and the rubbing will be passed on to the derailleur cage


    The photo shows the 1 x 10 setup that used MRP 32T single chainring. The design is clean and sleek. Absolutely no rubbing. The chainline is perfectly aligned with the cog, and the ride is so much stiffer.

  31. #31
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    Interesting.

    I clicked around a bit. The teeth on the XT ring are steel. The MRP ring is aluminum. The black stuff is a carbon composite. So I suspect that the weight of the teeth of the XT ring is the difference you found.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  32. #32
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    Sure is always better to use the right tool for the job, like a SS ring in your case.

    On mine I just kept the middle ring (steel 32t) since I already had it and was working fine. But I'll definitively go for a SS ring anytime I have to deal with a single ring setup.

    Just to know, how thick your MRP ring actually is ?
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Interesting.

    I clicked around a bit. The teeth on the XT ring are steel. The MRP ring is aluminum. The black stuff is a carbon composite. So I suspect that the weight of the teeth of the XT ring is the difference you found.
    Thanks for the info. I think you are right about the additional weight cause by the carbon composite.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Sure is always better to use the right tool for the job, like a SS ring in your case.

    On mine I just kept the middle ring (steel 32t) since I already had it and was working fine. But I'll definitively go for a SS ring anytime I have to deal with a single ring setup.

    Just to know, how thick your MRP ring actually is ?
    The thickness of the MRP single ring is 3mm.



    The thickness of the XT middle ring is about 7.5mm.


  35. #35
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    Great thread.

    Can someone opine and tell me why I shouldn't go lower than a 28T for my one ring?

    I'm running a 2x10 on an Intense Spider 29 (medium) with SRAM X9 cranks mated to SRAM X7 S1400 spider so that I could achieve the 104/64 BCD. With that I have a 38T/25T ring setup in front. In the back I have a SRAM X9 Type 2 derailleur (medium cage) running on a SRAM XX 11-36T cassette.

    I've been running this setup for about 50 hours/100 miles and rarely use my 38T front big ring. Living in the foothills of the Front Range, almost all of my riding is long climbs followed by long downhills. However, the downhills are long and steep enough that I don't need to do too much pedaling.

    If I were to go to the 1x10 would it make sense and be technically feasible to run a 25T or 26T?

  36. #36
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    I would like to convert my Giant XTC composite from 2x10 to 1x10,

    Would like to use an SRAM XX1 crank, will my stock SRAM X9 rear derailleur be ok to use with the XX1? would I need to remove any chain links?

  37. #37
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    Convert 2x10 to 1x10

    I just ordered parts to do the conversion. I'm going to keep my current stock ring and give it a shot before I order a wolf tooth chainring.

    I'm actually looking forward to this, big upgrade from my 3x8 speed system.

    Bill

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