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  1. #1
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    Chain Skip on 11-Tooth Only

    Brand new set up, SRAM 970 11-34 cassette, XTR Rear Derailleur, Shimano LX HG73 chain with a Whipperman quick connect link.

    The chain randomly skips on the 11-tooth gear and the doofus at the shop doesn't know what to do. He stated maybe lube it up more. One can only lube a chain so much. The owner who also is the guy that knows the most is out so here I am seeking input. I ran this same set up on my last bike with the only difference being an XT cassette and chain. It makes no difference which front ring the chain is on.

    Any ideas on what could be causing the skip?

    It seems to happen in the area of the quick connect link but why if it worked for me before?

    I am not much of a knowledgeable mechanic but am quickly seeing I should learn if the local shop is going to continue employing an inexperienced salesman trying to be a mechanic.


    Last question: Any suggestions for a good repair book?

  2. #2
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    check everything

    Now lets make sure all your bases are covered:

    First of all,

    Make sure the wheel is seated squarely in the dropouts (Happens more times than you'd think)

    Secondly, check the limits are set correctly on the derailleur. Although it should still be fine if it was working before, theres no harm in checking.

    Thirdly, Check the 11t for any "hooks" or anything that might be causing the chain to skip.

    Fourth, Never assume that new products are excempt from problems, check the chain for tight spots or damaged links. I've seen this quite a few times on new bikes as well as on new parts installed by ham fisted mechanics.

    Finally, (sorry Sram guys), buy SHIMANO! As someone who has had 990, 970 and 950 series cassettes and works as a mechanic, I can honestly say that there are more problems with wear and skipping with Sram cassetts then Shimano. I've thrown week old 990 cassettes in the garbage because thats the type of performance they provide.And yes, I do know how to setup my bikes, so don't bother.

    You may also want to try substituting the 11t for one from another cassette, this will elimanate your setup as a possibility and allow you to possibly claim it under warranty.

    Good Luck,

    Adam

  3. #3
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    Thanks and Shimano is on my list for upgrades. The cassette came with the new bike and I was planning on just wearing it out and then replacing it with an XT cassette and chain like my last bike set up.
    The rear derailleur set up still rattles my brain as I never really studied up on it much so I will leave that to the shop once the owner gets back but the other things I can check on my own. It may be set up wrong if the doofus did it.
    The wheel has been in and out a few times and each time the skips are the same each time so I don't think that is the problem unless the dropouts are installed poorly by the manufacturer.
    Will a shimano 11-tooth fit with the SRAM cassette? I have a used 11-32 LX cassette sitting in the shed. I'll have to get the right tools to do it myself but at least then my learning journey will have begun. I suppose I could just swap the whole cassette since I have it. Whoa, I think I may be learning already.

    Still need a good "Do It Yourself" repair book.

  4. #4
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    Never be worried about working on your own bike. When it comes to the rear derailleur, theres a few things that can help.

    The screws on the rear of the derailleur and its ability to make a clean shift are not necessarily corelated. The screws just determine how much the derailleur is allowed to move right and left (when looking from rear). The screw on the lower right, will set how close it can move towards the wheel, the screw on the upper left will determine how close it can move towards the dropout (although this is reversed on the odd derailleur, so check).

    Set your "wheel" limit, and test it by trying to push the chain in the spokes while pedalling "slowly"... otherwise you can push your derailleur in the spokes and create one hell of a mess. Conversely, try and pull the derailleur off the smallest sprocket into the frame, if either of these events occurs, screw in the limit.

    Then just throw the shifter in the smallest, tighten up your cable, pick up any slack with the barrel adjusters and bobs your uncle....

    Sorry for the rant, but this might be useful for future reference..

    Finish Strong,
    Adam

  5. #5
    Old man on a bike
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    First, to address your repeated requests for a book suggestion: Zinn's Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance is a good one. Online try sheldonbrown.com and parktool.com.

    Your chain, chainlink and cassette are all brand new? How do you know your chainrings aren't at fault instead of the 11t? Is your chain proper length? Has your derailleur hanger alignment been checked?
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by KPVSR
    Thanks and Shimano is on my list for upgrades. The cassette came with the new bike and I was planning on just wearing it out and then replacing it with an XT cassette and chain like my last bike set up.
    The rear derailleur set up still rattles my brain as I never really studied up on it much so I will leave that to the shop once the owner gets back but the other things I can check on my own. It may be set up wrong if the doofus did it.
    The wheel has been in and out a few times and each time the skips are the same each time so I don't think that is the problem unless the dropouts are installed poorly by the manufacturer.
    Will a shimano 11-tooth fit with the SRAM cassette? I have a used 11-32 LX cassette sitting in the shed. I'll have to get the right tools to do it myself but at least then my learning journey will have begun. I suppose I could just swap the whole cassette since I have it. Whoa, I think I may be learning already.

    Still need a good "Do It Yourself" repair book.
    here you go. i was a mechanic in the air force but i still use this one every now and again to remind myself how to do things. and get a nice stand. life will be good from that day on.
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/140...ike-Repair.htm

  7. #7
    Trying a little
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    its your middle chainring on the front worn out. Only takes effect when chain is at its loosest ( in 11 tooth on the back ).

    I never apologize. I'm sorry, but that's just the way I am.

  8. #8
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    First let me thank all for the book suggestions and advice...Thanks!

    Now to answer a couple questions asked:

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    Your chain, chainlink and cassette are all brand new?
    Yes the chain, chainlink and cassette are all brand new. With the exception of the chainlink they all came stock on the new bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    How do you know your chainrings aren't at fault instead of the 11t?
    The skip only happens in the 11-tooth and it doesn't matter which ring the chain is in. To me that ruled out the chainrings which are also new. Also when it skips I stop pedaling, stop the bike and check the location of the quick link. It is generally just past the cassette. I am thinking the link may be part of the problem after doing this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    Is your chain proper length?
    I assume it is since it came with the new bike. Didn't think switching the X0 to the XTR would affect chain length since both were long cage.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    Has your derailleur hanger alignment been checked?
    I am leaving that to the shop once the guy who knows what he is doing comes back. I am still not familiar enough with rear derailleurs to be confident I know what I am doing. Anything simple enough I could just look at and tell?

  9. #9
    Old man on a bike
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    The link sounds suspect at this point; does the link move freely? While the hanger alignment should be checked when changing the whole drivetrain like you did, it would probably manifest itself with more than the smallest cog (and you need an alignment gauge). Did you ever check the high gear limit screw for the rear derailleur like luffy suggested?
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

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