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  1. #1
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    cassette lifetime over?

    My chain is occasionally jumping off the largest cog of the cassette (Shimano 11-speed XTR 2015). I have measured the chain link length, and it is still in the viable range, hence the chain is not too old. What do you think by looking at the teeth of the cog? Do I need to replace the cassette ($300)?

    cassette lifetime over?-2015-10-17-15.10.34.jpgcassette lifetime over?-2015-10-17-15.10.50.jpg

  2. #2
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    Yeah, that thing is toast. How many chains have been on that cassette?

    xt cassettes are around $100.

  3. #3
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    Just 6 months and 2 chains. 4500 km and 135'000 m climb though.

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  4. #4
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    It sounds like it has served you well, let it go 4500 km and 135000 m climbed is a good lifetime in my eyes.
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  5. #5
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    I think that you guys are definitely right. But how can you diagnose that the cassette is toast?

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  6. #6
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    Symptoms alone are usually enough for me, new(er) chain skipping under pressure on an old cassette is one of the more common ailments in a bike repair shop. The fact that you can see the wear on the big cog that easily indicates extreme wear IME. Notice the pointiness of the teeth and the raked, ocean wave profile compared to the smaller ones.

    You did good getting that many miles out of it with only 2 chains, I usually replace mine @ around 500 miles. By the time you changed your first chain it would have been pretty worn, which also greatly accelerates wear on the cogs.

  7. #7
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    I have a 3x11 drivetrain. The new XT CS-M8000 cassette has a 42T option, but Shimano says that it is only for 1x11, and 3x11 should use the 40T option. Any idea why that is so? I wouldn't mind a 42T cog!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    I have a 3x11 drivetrain. The new XT CS-M8000 cassette has a 42T option, but Shimano says that it is only for 1x11, and 3x11 should use the 40T option. Any idea why that is so? I wouldn't mind a 42T cog!
    Possibly too much difference in chain capacity. Small-small vs. big-big chainring/cog combinations.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    I think that you guys are definitely right. But how can you diagnose that the cassette is toast?

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    Just look at the shape of the teeth. The teeth on the large cog look very thin and pointy, even compared to the other teeth on the cassette. It is titanium, so its not going to get as much life as a steel cog.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    I have a 3x11 drivetrain. The new XT CS-M8000 cassette has a 42T option, but Shimano says that it is only for 1x11, and 3x11 should use the 40T option. Any idea why that is so? I wouldn't mind a 42T cog!
    I think it can be used 3x11 if you don't run the 42 on your large ring.

  11. #11
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    I'm not sure if the large cog is replaceable on Shimano cassettes, but it is on SRAM. I went through mine in about the same amount of time, was shocked it would wear so fast. The SRAM 42t cogs are aluminum, so they get shreaded and if you climb a lot you are on that cog quite a bit. It's definitely worth thinking through what is going to last/ be most economical over the long haul. For me, it's about $100 for the new 42t cog on the SRAM cassette, which isnt too bad.

  12. #12
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    The pointy teeth of the large cog was the giveaway.
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  13. #13
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    Hosed. This is why the more $$ cassettes are really not worth the ~100g weight savings. An XT weighs ~340 vs. this at ~280 and will last much longer and only cost $55 vs. over $100 (Jenson).
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  14. #14
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    I don't disagree. I hadn't imagined that it would wear so quickly. I went XTR for shifting precision (which i maintain is impressive) nor so much for weight.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriano View Post
    I don't disagree. I hadn't imagined that it would wear so quickly.

    4500km is a lot of miles for a cassette IME, I wouldn't say it wore out quickly.

  16. #16
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    An alternative to replacing everything is to just run it.

    The cassette it worn already so you don't need to worry about damaging it. Chances are the chain-rings are similarly worn. Although the chain is skipping just now, if you keep riding it what happens is that the chain and gears will wear to each other and it will stop skipping. Under heavy use it can happen quite quickly.

    Then, you just run the whole transmission until it's dead and you have to replace the lot at once. Expensive when that day comes but overall much cheaper than starting to replace stuff now.

  17. #17
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    Almost 2800 miles is pretty good. I usually only get 1700 miles on my XT cassettes before they break apart at the pins.

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  18. #18
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    On year 3 with my rear 20t single speed cog .....sorry came here to feel good about my self

  19. #19
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    I know a racer who got nearly 8000 miles from his XX 10-speed cassette. He changes chains every thousand miles and almost never goes into the 36t cog. Impressive!
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  20. #20
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    One more question. The Shimano 11-speed cassettes are compatible only with Shimano chains, not with SRAM 11-speed chains, right? However, it is OK to use the SRAM-like "magic links" (as long as they are 11-speed quality) on a Shimano chain, such as the CN-HG900. Right? I hate those Shimano pins...

  21. #21
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    And one more question! Shimano 11-speed chains are directional. In principle, there are four different ways of installing a chain. Am I right to assume that two of these are right (the writings are on the outside face), while two are wrong? Meaning that it does not matter whether the chain goes clockwise or counterclockwise as long as the writings are on the outside?

  22. #22
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    Supposedly they are compatible - Drivetrain compatibility hidden in plain sight - VeloNews.com

    Personally I'd use a KMC chain and not bother with the directional issue and Shimano pins. I like the quick links too much to use Shimano chains and KMC shifts great anyway. I even get very good shifting with a 9 speed KMC chain on 10-speed Shimano 'HG-X Chain Only' triple chainrings.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsilva View Post
    I even get very good shifting with a 9 speed KMC chain on 10-speed Shimano 'HG-X Chain Only' triple chainrings.
    Can you use 9-speed chains on a 10-speed transmission? I thought they would be too wide?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Can you use 9-speed chains on a 10-speed transmission? I thought they would be too wide?
    Nope. Alternatively, you can also use 10-speed chains on 9-speed components...
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Can you use 9-speed chains on a 10-speed transmission? I thought they would be too wide?
    I have a KMC 9-speed chain with a 9-speed Shimano SLX cassette and rear derailleur. The front is Shimano Dynasys 10-speed. It works fine.

  26. #26
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    Interesting. You learn something every day.

  27. #27
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    I like my KMC chains, they have served me well in my 11,000 miles of cycling experience.

    Had one break on me once in the 3rd quarter of a 50 mile Indy tour not long ago. I would fixed the damned thing but for some reason I was missing half of my Alien II even though I had a quick link with me.

    I was just pissed cuz it woulda been awesome to fix it!

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