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Thread: Best degreaser?

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    Best degreaser?

    I need to degrease and clean the chian and jockey wheels from the rear drl. Any suggestions on the best degreaser for the job?

    Right now they are soaking in Dawn dish detergent.
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
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  2. #2
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    Gas,mineral spirits,Simply Green, WD-40.The list goes on and on and on........

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    I need to degrease and clean the chian and jockey wheels from the rear drl. Any suggestions on the best degreaser for the job?

    Right now they are soaking in Dawn dish detergent.
    WD-40 makes an excellent degreaser. You can also use it to lube your chain & clean the grease in your headset/bottom bracket. No more dirty grease!
    What's wrong with him??

  4. #4
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    Best degreaser? -

    SF-77 –A heavy duty synthetic cleaner/degreaser concentrate. SF-77 is a diphase cleaner which means that it works like a detergent on dirt and like a solvent on grease and oil. The synthetic cleaners will not leave a residue. SF-77 is nonflammable and dilutes with plain water. Contains no dangerous solvents such as butyl-cellosolve. At high use dilutions SF-77 is the perfect cleaner for stainless steel, Formica, painted surfaces, and appliances. At lower dilutions SF-77 is powerful enough to clean grills, filters, engines, and for small parts stripping. It is also a good car and truck body washer that will not harm paint, but removes road oil and grime. SF-77 is excellent for cleaning aluminum as it will remove moderate oxidation. Packed 4 gallons per case, 5 gal. pail, and 30 or 55 gal. drums.
    The stuff is nasty on your hands, burns a little if you don't have gloves on, but it works extremely well. That being said, I prefer to use Simple Green on my bike, if the chain gets especially nasty I soak it in Kerosene or Mineral Spirits, then use a tooth brush dipped in either one to clean the jockey wheels, cassette and chainring.

    Edit: What I like about petroleum based degreaser is that I do not have to worry about rust or drying everything well. It will displace water, like WD-40 will and leave a clean, dry surface to apply my lube of choice.
    Last edited by emtnate; 09-30-2009 at 01:55 PM.

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    Finch: Even I know not to use WD-40 as a lubricant.

    Where would I get mineral spirits?
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197

    Where would I get mineral spirits?
    Go to a mineral spring & wait until midnight. They usually come out around then.
    What's wrong with him??

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    You can get mineral spirits in the paint section of any hardware store or *mart store.

  8. #8
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    If you want to use something biodegradable, get a jug of simple green from Home Depot. Its $15 for a gallon and you can dilute it down 50% and it still works great. I just drop my chain in a cup for a half hour and it rinses clean. I also use it on a towel to clean cogs etc.
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    Go to Home Depot [or similar] and get TurpAtine not TurpENtine. The former is a petroleum distilate and the latter is a tree sap distilate. TurpAtine works awesome. drop in what ever and give it a swish and the chain is sparkling, after that some hot soapy water and then cold to rinse out the soap. I have found it to be the BEST [bar none] degreaser ever
    Resistance is to high a gear.. i mean futile

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte
    Go to a mineral spring & wait until midnight. They usually come out around then.

  11. #11
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    I use a citrus product from Walmart, in the auto dept in an orange bottle. Works pretty good and is only ~ $4.

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    I buy the gallon jug of Zep Heavy Duty Citrus Degreaser from Home Depot. It's just under $10 and will last you a long time. Also buy the Park Tool chain cleaner (not the kit, just the scrubber), the Park Tool cassette brush, and a Zep spray bottle from Home Depot. Everything should run you about $30-$35. I've had my chain cleaner for years and it still works great. I use the Zep degreaser to fill the scrubber and spray bottle on the cassette, derailleurs, and crank.

  13. #13
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    Thanks to everyone. i went and got a bottle of Simple Green - or a generic brand of the same thing - and a dollar power toothbrush. Makes getting the grease of easy.
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte
    Go to a mineral spring & wait until midnight. They usually come out around then.
    :wq

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    Thanks to everyone. i went and got a bottle of Simple Green - or a generic brand of the same thing - and a dollar power toothbrush. Makes getting the grease of easy.
    Sounds green to me. That's good I guess. I use plain old white gas, aka camp fuel.

  16. #16
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    brakekleen

    Brakekleen ( I like CRC Brand ) is an aerosol high evap solvent that auto techs use working on brake systems (and everything else) Its bad stuff, but cleans like mad and leaves a clean, dry oil free surface. It evaporates and dries really fast. You need to use caution with it. Available at any auto parts store. I spray it on then scrub a little, and blow clean with compressed air

    Im sure green leaning folks probably might not find it favorable, but in my experience it will out clean any green cleaner ever made. My .02

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    Thanks to everyone. i went and got a bottle of Simple Green - or a generic brand of the same thing - and a dollar power toothbrush. Makes getting the grease of easy.

    good choice i use this in combination with my park tool chain cleaner and the chain gets clean very quickly! simple green is cheap effective and a lot less damaging to your bike if it spills on the paint

    joe

  18. #18
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    the dumonde citrus degreaser works really well and isn't nasty to work with, it is however spendy and some what hard to find

  19. #19
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    Pedros oranj peelz

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    Simple Green corrodes aluminum, depending on concentration and time exposure. I used it on a chain once, and it never was as smooth afterwards. I like WD40 a lot better, yes it doesn't offer long term lubrication. But as a solvent, it does a good job breaking off junk stuck on chain crevices without any bad side effects. WD40 also gives a little rust protection since it does displace water. I don't want any water based degreaser on my chain.

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    I've never had an issue with Tri-Flow. Is that water based?
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
    My Blog: http://http://kona0197.wordpress.com/

  22. #22
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    There's no need to be soaking your derailleur pulleys and, if you have the type with cartridge bearings, you may actually be making their condition worse. To save me repeating myself, here's something I've already written about chain and derailleur cleaning; you may find them useful.

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  23. #23
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    I couldn't get the jockey wheels out of the drl. The bolt holding them in is seized. Ruined an allen wrench on trying to get the bolt loose. So I just let it soak and wiped away the grime. It's a '03 era Shimano XT model. Was going to shot the pulleys with a few drops of Tri-Flow tomorrow.
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
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    Quote Originally Posted by rallyraid
    Simple Green corrodes aluminum, depending on concentration and time exposure. I used it on a chain once, and it never was as smooth afterwards. I like WD40 a lot better, yes it doesn't offer long term lubrication. But as a solvent, it does a good job breaking off junk stuck on chain crevices without any bad side effects. WD40 also gives a little rust protection since it does displace water. I don't want any water based degreaser on my chain.

    I use WD-40 to degrease as well. I spray it it on the chain at the jockey wheel, scrub with a stiff brush, and let it set for 5-10 minutes. Then I dry it with a rag and blow off any remaining WD-40 with my air compressor. Lastly, apply some Finish Line Dry Teflon Lube and remove excess.

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    Not to thread jack or anything BUT... I have white lithium grease chain lube that I use on my motorcycle chains, can I use it on a bike chain or is it too heavy duty?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zabrow187
    Not to thread jack or anything BUT... I have white lithium grease chain lube that I use on my motorcycle chains, can I use it on a bike chain or is it too heavy duty?
    I wouldn't use it, its usually too thick to penetrate the chain links. You need a thin lube for bike chains and preferably a dry lube (Teflon) so the dirt doesn't stick to it and wear you chain out even faster.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rallyraid
    Simple Green corrodes aluminum, depending on concentration and time exposure.
    Bah - just use some common sense. You know, water will corrode the metal bits on your bike depending on the time exposure, too.

    I've used simple green on my bikes and as a general cleaner for over 20 years. It's one of the best degreasers out there. Just like everything else out there, follow the directions, use it correctly, and it works like a charm.

    Simple green FAQ's:
    http://www.simplegreen.com/solutions...owAll=Show+All

  28. #28
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    You can overdo it with the degreasing. I've found my chain life goes down if I use something that removes everything, even when I immediately lube it afterward. As was said before, you probably don't want to get the stuff around sealed bearings, either.
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  29. #29
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    I use Pedros. It works great.
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    well i use good ole Dihydrogen monoxide mixed with a bit of Simple Green for the oily stuff
    don't use it on aluminum though, it's corrosive!

  31. #31
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    i dont use degreaser at all...

    I just start pedaling so fast that the centrifugal force just flings the dirt and grime right off!!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by summud
    I just start pedaling so fast that the centrifugal force just flings the dirt and grime right off!!
    Better not try that on one of those fancy aluminum chains... you might deform one of the plates and we all know how well aluminum handles deformation
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  33. #33
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    I use the orange Wal Mart stuff too for the chain.

    I use a rag soaked in mineral spirits for the cassette, chainrings and derailleurs. It gets the stuff clean and evaporates pretty quickly.
    Don't take anything I say seriously.

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    Quote Originally Posted by deoreo
    Bah - just use some common sense. You know, water will corrode the metal bits on your bike depending on the time exposure, too.

    I've used simple green on my bikes and as a general cleaner for over 20 years. It's one of the best degreasers out there. Just like everything else out there, follow the directions, use it correctly, and it works like a charm.

    Simple green FAQ's:
    http://www.simplegreen.com/solutions...owAll=Show+All
    No, water will not cause structural failure of aluminum when used for cleaning. Simple Green will. That's why Simple Green is banned for use on aircraft by the DoD. Planes fly in the rain just fine.

    Many people don't want to rinse their bike chain with a garden hose after a SG cleaning. Do whatever that works for you.

  35. #35
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    I read in MBA recently that the lube the factory applies will last the life of the chain. Wonder if that's true.
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    I read in MBA recently that the lube the factory applies will last the life of the chain. Wonder if that's true.
    What Shimano (or KMC for all but the XTR/DuraAce) applies at the factory is not lube, per se; it's a grease used in the chain's assembly and to protect it from corrosion on the shelf. From my own experience, I would say that MBA's assertion is incorrect. Do you have a link to an article?

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  37. #37
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    Brake cleaner
    Gunk
    Kerosene
    Shout (works w/ laundry too - go figure)

    Edit: I missed the "clean the chain" part... I'd use kerosene there. Get yourself a parts washing pan and a brush. Run yer chain and j-wheels thru that stuf, then dry, lube and reinstall.

    Use this on the chain:

    http://www.dumondetech.com/ProductBicycle.html (I use lite)
    Last edited by selector; 10-02-2009 at 08:05 PM.

  38. #38
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    No link. Sometime I'll look through my issues dating back to 2000 to find it.
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
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  39. #39
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    Sheldon Brown wrote on his site that the factory stuff was the best stuff for the chain. He also had a little diagram about how the different joints in each link are best lubed using a variety of products and the only way to replicate the factory job would be to take each pin and roller out of each link and lube / grease them appropriately.

    I'm no chemist, so I can't say what is best for the life of the chain. Where I ride, the crap that is coated from the factory has to go. It's sticky and attracts way too much dirt and grime.

    Whenever I buy a new chain, I clean that stuff off with kerosene or mineral spirits and use Tri Flow. It probably shortens the life of the chain, but it's a trade off I'm willing to accept.

  40. #40
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    Here's Sheldon Brown's site

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainclean.html

    Yes, it was placed into the internet ethosphere as a joke...and a pretty funny one at that. At the bottom of the post is a link for actual info as well.
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  41. #41
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    Well on the Shelton Brown site that isn't a joke he does recommend this:

    Factory Lube

    New chains come pre-lubricated with a grease-type lubricant which has been installed at the factory. This is an excellent lubricant, and has been made to permeate all of the internal interstices in the chain.

    This factory lube is superior to any lube that you can apply after the fact.

    Some people make the bad mistake of deliberately removing this superior lubricant. Don't do this!

    The factory lubricant all by itself is usually good for several hundred miles of service if the bike is not ridden in wet or dusty conditions. It is best not to apply any sort of lube to a new chain until it is clearly needed, because any wet lube you can apply will dilute the factory lube.
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    Well on the Shelton Brown site that isn't a joke he does recommend this:
    It's Sheldon, not Shelton...and mixing up the "d" and "t" keys aren't a typo FWIW...but really the only reason I posted was to thank Joeboater for the link to the hilarious article he wrote for the overly anal chain cleaners...
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  43. #43
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    Kona, it is hard to imagine mountain biking in conditions that are not wet or dusty. His site is one of my first go-to places for biking advice, but I'm not sure his recommendation applies here.

    Like I said, I'll sacrifice chain life for not having all that grime stuck on my chain. I generally go through a chain every 5-6 mos, and I ride year round.

    Laugh all you want about his package options, I replaced a chain today and had 5 powerlinks on it.

  44. #44
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    I have yet to replace a chain. I don't ride much.

    Bikefoolforlife: Sorry about the typo. I must be tired. Thanks.
    My Bike: '19 Giant Talon 2 29er
    My Blog: http://http://kona0197.wordpress.com/

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by emtnate
    Sheldon Brown wrote on his site that the factory stuff was the best stuff for the chain...
    You've overlooked that his recommendation is dependent on the bike not being used in wet or dusty conditions; the typical conditions for a mountain bike. Furthermore, and perhaps more pertinently, Shimano do not use the same grease on their chains now that they did when Sheldon made his remarks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
    "Mountain bike" (MTB) is the currently preferred term for bicycles made for off-road use. Mountain bikes use 559 mm wheels, have at least 15 speeds, and usually have cantilever brakes.

    The mountain bike is in many ways a hybrid design, a cross between a BMX bicycle and a touring bicycle.
    All that said, although I disagree with MBA's "life of the chain" assertion, the factory stuff tends to be just fine for a few rides, then I wash it out and replace with my lube of choice. The new Shimano grease is much, much less sticky than the stuff they used up until a year or so ago. My habit with chains then was to dampen a cloth with white spirit and run a new chain through it to remove the grease on the outside of the chain. It wouldn't pick up anywhere near as much trail crap as it would otherwise.

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