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  1. #1
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    10 year old derailleurs

    I have 10 year old Deore LX (rear) and Shimano Nexave (front) derailleurs used daily for commuting. They shift reliably, but I'd replace them if I knew they were worn or if age makes them require more force to shift. Is there a way to objectively evaluate derailleurs?

  2. #2
    Evolutionsverlierer
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    Not sure if I would worry about as long as they shift good,
    if they require more force to shift it also could be old cables or it needs some lubrication.

    Never thought about it but I would install it on a frame without the chain and move it by hand and check it it moves without any noise and smooth.
    Maybe wiggle it while moving to see if it has excessive play.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    Avid is spelled wrong, there should be an 'O' in there.

  3. #3
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    Does one ever have to replace the jockey wheels?

    10 year old derailleurs-derailleur.jpg

  4. #4
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    You don't have to replace them, just like you don't ever have to clean your chain.

    Just kidding you should probably do both!

  5. #5
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    What could fix the problems

    Give the derailleur a good clean & lube
    Get new jockey wheels & chain
    Probably need to get a new cassette
    Possibly need new shifter cable & housing, you might be able to get away with giving the old cable & housing a good clean & lube.

    What do the cassette & chainrings look like?

  6. #6
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    I was taught to replace the chain when, center-to-center, a 12" section of chain measures 12-1/8". (Hope that is the current wisdom.) I wish there was a Go/No-Go gauge one could test chain rings and cassettes to determine when the gears need replacing. Is there such a thing?

    I only get joy by replacing parts that are broken or worn-out.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by stingray View Post
    I was taught to replace the chain when, center-to-center, a 12" section of chain measures 12-1/8". (Hope that is the current wisdom.) I wish there was a Go/No-Go gauge one could test chain rings and cassettes to determine when the gears need replacing. Is there such a thing?
    12 1/8" is too far gone, by that time the cassette and probably the chainrings are likely shot, best to change @ 12 1/16". Personally I never measure and just change mine @ ~500 miles to avoid any confusion.

    Just from reading this thread and looking at the photos I can say with 97% certainty that if you replace your chain you will also need to replace your cassette and chainrings, unless you enjoy severe skippage at the most inopportune times.

  8. #8
    Crash Dummy In Training
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    Chain Wear Indicator - Park Tool
    I was told by a bike shop that at .75% you most likely need a new cassette.
    there is this one also.
    Chain Checker - Park Tool
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PauLCa916 View Post
    Chain Wear Indicator - Park Tool
    I was told by a bike shop that at .75% you most likely need a new cassette.
    there is this one also.
    Chain Checker - Park Tool
    Those tools, and most on the market, are measuring both pin and roller wear. Pin wear, as it causes elongation, is what you need to be worried about. As far as I know the Shimano TL-CN42 is the only wear indicator designed to give an accurate reading of when a chain is worn out, though unless you are checking often can be a little late.

    With the Park tool I find that a chain at 75% can have a lot of life left, so I would not expect a cassette to be anywhere near worn (unless it has seen multiple chains).

    Stingray, your bike looks like it could use a good cleaning, I would start there. Also, your pulleys are VERY worn, likely due to a chain that is also very worn. At this point I would suspect that you cassette and chainrings are also due for replacement. While Rohloff does make a tool to measure cassette wear I find it to be hard to use, mostly due to the poor instructions, and inaccurate. The real world test of a worn cassette and rings is excessive noise, shifting issues, or skipping under load.

    Derailers can become stiff with neglect. The only "test" is to compare them to a new sample (preferably the same model). It may be a good idea to check for pivot wear using the same method.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all the great suggestions. I know my bike needs work. I'm just trying to create my list of parts to order.

    I measured my chain and it is 12-1/16, thats +0.5%. I will also try the cassette wear test shown in this helpful cassette wear video

    I keep a detailed record of service on my car. I really need to do the same for the bikes in my family. Time blurs and I can't remember what I did to who's bike. Commuter bikes take a beating and get little love in return.

  11. #11
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    My wife bought me this chain checker - anyone use this one before?

    Name:  image.jpeg
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by matuchi View Post
    My wife bought me this chain checker - anyone use this one before?

    Name:  image.jpeg
Views: 110
Size:  15.1 KB
    Yep, TL-CN41. I used one of those prior to the redesign. The new TL-CN42 is just easier to use.

  13. #13
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    Do they both work as good? ^^

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by stingray View Post
    I have 10 year old Deore LX (rear) and Shimano Nexave (front) derailleurs used daily for commuting. They shift reliably, but I'd replace them if I knew they were worn or if age makes them require more force to shift. Is there a way to objectively evaluate derailleurs?
    Derailleurs usually need more force to shift when cables/housing are bad.

    If the derailleurs have side to side play, they are on borrowed time.

    Otherwise, keep using them.

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