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Thread: wheelying

  1. #1
    sufferer of a.d.d.
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    wheelying

    ok, i am way too old to learn how to wheely...probably. i am 29 and used to bmx ride ALOT when i was a youth but i gave it up when i was about 13 having never really learned how to wheely. now a couple of months into mtn biking i am frustrated by the fact that i can still not wheely. if i haven't learned how by now am i a lost cause? should i be seated or can i do it standing...seated is probably the easier of the two to learn i assume, right? tips are appreciated but please refrain from flaming... im just an oldie trying to become a goodie

  2. #2
    Shortcutting Hikabiker
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    Put it in a lowish gear, then pull up on the handlebars and pedal faster at the same time. It's easiest to seated by far, acually it would probably be pretty hard to do standing up. Make sure you learn on flats too, if you're riding clipless and get too far back you might have issues.

  3. #3
    VIA
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    Also keep a finger or two in the rear break lever...

  4. #4
    Just roll it......
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    A few tips.

    While I'm no expert on wheelies, I've recently been getting better due to mucho practice. Here are my basic tips that I've learned through trial and error.

    1. Save the tailbone and use flat pedals - not clipless. I've witnessed enough buddies (and felt the wrath myself) of going too far back and landing on my back/tailbone. Being able to land on your feet will ensure that your wheelie practice doesn't lead to a trip to the hospital.
    2. Practice on a grass field - just in case you do take a tumble.
    3. Stay seated and drop the seat a little bit....you don't want your center of gravity too high.
    4. Pre-load your front shock and then pull back using your momentum to help get the front wheel up to the desired height and give a good power stroke as you do this.
    5. Make sure you've got your gearing right. Too easy and you won't be able to generate enough power to keep your wheelie going...........too difficult and you won't be able to pull the wheel up on your power stroke.
    7. Practice at different speeds. Some people prefer to go faster or slower depending on their comfort level. I can tell you that I tend to ride slower when practicing wheelies.
    8. Keep a finger on your rear brake. When you feel like you're going over the back, sqeeze that sucker. You're front end will slam down pretty hard, but it's better than landing on your back.
    9. Use your legs to help keep you balanced and not tilting to one side or another. At times, I flare my legs out a little bit to finesse the bike to keep it in a line - along with pulling on the handlebars to steer myself a little.
    10. Practice, Practice, Practice.

    I'm sure someone with much better talents than I can elaborate more clearly on the fine art, but that's what I've learned so far. Good luck!

    EB

  5. #5
    Doesnt ride Banshees
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    I consider myself pretty good at wheelies, i can ride them for quite a damn ways, and this is my advice to you. Just always keep one or two fingers on the rear brake, a wheelie to me is atleast 80% in the braking, when you get to far back you give it alittle brake, when you get to far forward give it alittle extra of a pedal. My second bit of advice is to maintain speed, dont try to go faster and faster, just stay at one easy smooth consitent pace and you can ride them forever. When you get better you can go faster and shift gears but id seriously hold out until you got wheelies down. My third bit of advice is to just practice, play around with where your "balance" spot is, usually its that spot when you feel like your goin over the back, just get used to that feelin, its a part of coaster wheelies and wheelies in general. good luck.

    sparky

  6. #6
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    wheelies

    Quote Originally Posted by warmseth
    ok, i am way too old to learn how to wheely...probably. i am 29 and used to bmx ride ALOT when i was a youth but i gave it up when i was about 13 having never really learned how to wheely. now a couple of months into mtn biking i am frustrated by the fact that i can still not wheely. if i haven't learned how by now am i a lost cause? should i be seated or can i do it standing...seated is probably the easier of the two to learn i assume, right? tips are appreciated but please refrain from flaming... im just an oldie trying to become a goodie
    ive been doing wheelies for almost 30 years (actually i started on a bmx) and have found out that the first thing you should practice is to pedal real slow on a high gear and then give it a power stroke to the pedals and a pull to the handle bar till you go all the way back be prepared to land on your feet repeat this as many times as possible it will give you a feel for the balance and force needed.

  7. #7
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    As long as you are a youth at heart then it doesn't matter what age you are. I am no expert but i can wheelie a good ways.


    PUT THE SEAT UP SOME. this give you more leaverage and control. Lots of Free Riders ride with it down, I put it somewhere in the middle so i don't hit my Family Jewls on the seat. Anyway when wheelying just put the seat up and start almost from a stop or a rolling start. Sit on the back of the seat. Make sure you are in a low gear... like 2,1-2,3. Just peadle and your front end will come up and just keep a nice steady pace going and before you know it... you will be able to go across the bball courts.
    Ride to Die.
    Die to Ride.

  8. #8
    Buckle Up
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    Quote Originally Posted by Korrupt
    As long as you are a youth at heart then it doesn't matter what age you are. I am no expert but i can wheelie a good ways.


    PUT THE SEAT UP SOME. this give you more leaverage and control. Lots of Free Riders ride with it down, I put it somewhere in the middle so i don't hit my Family Jewls on the seat. Anyway when wheelying just put the seat up and start almost from a stop or a rolling start. Sit on the back of the seat. Make sure you are in a low gear... like 2,1-2,3. Just peadle and your front end will come up and just keep a nice steady pace going and before you know it... you will be able to go across the bball courts.
    I agree with the guy above, its easier to do a wheelie with your seat up a little higher than normal for a FR/DH bike. It puts more of your weight over the rear wheel so its easier to get the front end up and stay balanced. The key to a good wheelie is having your rear brake setup properly, you wont be able to maintain a wheelie if your brake grabs too quickly. I set up my brakes with the pads backed out pretty far so there is room to control pressure with the lever.
    <><

  9. #9
    sufferer of a.d.d.
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    well thank you for the replies. i went out tonight and made some small headway. i got a wheely up and managed three creank revolutions which is one more than i've been able to do thusfar so prgress is progress, howver small. it felt like it was easier when i stopped concentrating on the front tire and looked more ahead..true?

  10. #10
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    The art of the wheelie

    The way I learned to wheelie was when I lived in Japan I rode my bike to the University everyday (10km) and practiced wheeling the whole time. I started out not being able to wheely at all, and in a couple of weeks I was wheeling all over the place. It was also pretty cool that all of the Japanese people would stop and check you out. It was almost like an entertainment thing. The only way to learn is to just keep doing it everyday, then you will be a master.

  11. #11
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    Good advice by all. I think standing up is a lot easier, but sitting looks cooler.

    I too think you should raise your seat. If you put your butt back on the saddle a little more than usual it is much easier to get the front end up. If i'm having trouble wheelying and I remember to scoot back a little on the seat it helps a lot.

    Practice and try slight changes if the current game plan isn't working for you. And stay loose!

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