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  1. #1
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    Whats wrong with....

    Whats wrong with riding a FR DH bike as an all around trail bike? Read another post and someone really made fun of another guy who was doing it, so what is the big deal?

  2. #2
    For The Win
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    It's like driving a monster truck over curbs, there's nothing wrong with it, there's just no point to have all that bike for that, I can't see why you would wan't to anyway, they're frickin' heavy and usually fairly bad peddlers..
    Slow is cool too, right?

  3. #3
    Capricious youth...
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    There's nothing wrong with it.

    For over two years I road big 43+ pound bikes as all mountain, XC, etc. But that was because I didn't know better.

    The steeper head-tube angle of a trail bike/XC bike does wonders for slow speed, tight cornering, not to mention climbing. Plus, it helps you feel more like you're rolling OVER something as opposed to INTO-and-OVER something like a slacked-out headtube can feel. The lesser amount of travel will typically make climbing a WHOLE lot easier. One of top, the smaller, lighter, less-beefy components will typically translate into, on average, 5-15 pounds less weight. And you'd be surprised what that huge weight diet can do for you. Especially when it comes to wheels. Less rolling resistance makes for easier pedaling efficiency as well as easier cornering.

    There are, of course, downsides. For instance... you take your trail/XC bike out 15 miles into the middle of nowhere and find this awesome jump park. Well, you may want to reconsider hitting the 5 foot drop-to-flat on your bike because you're liable to snap or permanently damage something, and 15 miles is a long walk back to your car or civilization with a 30 pound bike on your back.

    Anyway, there you have it.
    Meh.

  4. #4
    Why aren't you riding????
    Reputation: offtheedge's Avatar
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    absolutely nothing. Ride what you want or have wherever you want. Screw all the Nancys who think you need a bike for every type of riding. Sure no one bike will be perfect for all types of riding, but unless you are competing on a high level who cares.

    Just ride, have fun and don't sweat the details.

  5. #5
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    Probably better off riding something a bit sturdier so you can hit the heavy sections of trails hard without fearing equipment failure.

    If I am thinking of the thread you are thinking of, it's only becuase the poster said something about "stoking up" riders, but posted pictures of mediocre riding. That's OK, but so many people have truly sick photo's posted up, without any self-gratifying request for "stoking people up". Maybe "A cruise on an easy trail" would have resulted in less slander?

    I mean, check out DJPonee's photos as ONE example of many!
    Quote Originally Posted by dowst
    Next time you want to post worthless, stupid sh*t like this, go here:

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  6. #6
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    i say there is nothing wrong with it at all...while it would be nice to have a bike for every purpose i can climb with my 38lbs. BigHit as well as some xc guys on bikes half the weight, then get to bomb down twice as fast...plus if you can climb with a DH bike you can climb with anything

  7. #7
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    I figured these would be the responses I would get. There is nothing heavy about this bike (Chucker 1.0) maybe 34 Lbs, correct me if I'm wrong, but I enjoy it very much. Especially having a frame that will stand up to about anything. Thanks!

  8. #8
    NICE KID...NICE
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    Nothing wrong with it

    I just got back from an All mountain with some serious pedaling and climbing. He was riding a Gran Mal. He pushed his bike up the hills less than I did.

    All around bikes are a matter of perspective. If you got the legs,the lungs and the drive.... your bike can do it all.
    Last edited by wookie freeride; 08-07-2008 at 10:48 PM.
    "At that point man, your just riding your bike."


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by wookie freeride
    He pushed his bike up the hills more less than I did.

    More less, that means more?
    Quote Originally Posted by dowst
    Next time you want to post worthless, stupid sh*t like this, go here:

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  10. #10
    NICE KID...NICE
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    cut me some slack

    Its late
    "At that point man, your just riding your bike."


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  11. #11
    Disco-Superfly
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    I use my 47lb v10 for everything... I can't afford more bikes and I like to downhill so when it comes to riding street it's what I use. Great workout, but man I could sure use a 4" travel hardtail..
    Jake
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Moody
    Didn't you read the sticker on that shock? It said not to do whatever you did.

  12. #12
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    i use my orange patriot for every thing which is why i whent for boxxer ride's for the adustable travel. annd my mate uses his big weighty demo 8 for every thing, he did a similar thing to me, he bought some 08 fox talas 36. the main reason we both did this is becuse we have to ride 7-9 miles to get to the neaist trail so if we try with full on DH rigs we would get there ad just die of exhaustion.
    Quote Originally Posted by [Orge
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    This problem could quite simply be solved if people would stop buying Konas.

  13. #13
    Fort Valley = Gnarl Fest
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    I'll bite....

    I rocked my Bullit w/ Jr. T for everything. I did not win any races up but had fun on the way down

  14. #14
    maker of trail
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    I ride my session 77 with 888 for everything from crusher dust trails with the wife, to DH...

    I get funny looks from people starting out on an XC'ish trail, but since its all I ride, I can actually pedal it ok too, which has surprised people

  15. #15
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    My gf and I both ride our [old] RFX's on everything, from singletrack to climbs to the top of DH/FR courses. She kills most men on XC rigs going up on her RFX.

    While we haven't built them as full-on FR rigs, as much as proper geo heavy duty rigs, they still are usable and fun to ride everywhere, from ST to DH. The best part is rides aren't just "there and back", but now they have so much more fun in terms of the fact that we don't have to keep to the flat trails. We can play on the stuff along the way.

  16. #16
    Some Assembly Required
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    My gf and I both ride our [old] RFX's on everything, from singletrack to climbs to the top of DH/FR courses. She kills most men on XC rigs going up on her RFX.

    While we haven't built them as full-on FR rigs, as much as proper geo heavy duty rigs, they still are usable and fun to ride everywhere, from ST to DH. The best part is rides aren't just "there and back", but now they have so much more fun in terms of the fact that we don't have to keep to the flat trails. We can play on the stuff along the way.

    Yep, yup. I rode my Bullit for everything and then my 45lb VP Free served the same duty, now my 43lb Nomad is my do it all tool. Gonna build up my VP Free again for the bigger dh days. I'm usually the 1st or 2nd guy to the top on our rides and some of them have 45min to 1hr climbs while runnin' 26-36 rings. WEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE !!!!!!!

    IMO,
    XC bike = easy & fun on climbs, no so much fun for dh sections but doable

    DH/freeride bike = not so much fun climbing but doable, very much fun on dh sections

    Gimme the dh/freeride bike every time.
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by man w/ one hand
    Yep, yup. I rode my Bullit for everything and then my 45lb VP Free served the same duty, now my 43lb Nomad is my do it all tool. Gonna build up my VP Free again for the bigger dh days. I'm usually the 1st or 2nd guy to the top on our rides and some of them have 45min to 1hr climbs while runnin' 26-36 rings. WEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE !!!!!!!

    IMO,
    XC bike = easy & fun on climbs, no so much fun for dh sections but doable

    DH/freeride bike = not so much fun climbing but doable, very much fun on dh sections

    Gimme the dh/freeride bike every time.
    You know, I mentioned recently elsewhere, and I neglected to put it here, but I was riding a 25-26 pound rig right before I got my RFX, at which point I put on ten pounds. What I found was climbing was actually more fun. I think it might boil down to even genetics, on some level, with the type of fibers I have. I was able to get up on the Flux, but I'd die on climbs. Perhaps it was in a way too easy to pedal and I was spinning myself out of control and into a burnout. I can now climb on my RFX, perhaps being more controlled, and seemingly longer. 1x9 with only a 32t up front.

    So the point is it's not necessarily the bike, and of course, one can't overcome the physics of more weight going up against gravity on an angle, but there's the human factor in between that always f*cks every equation up, and perhaps that's where I lie in this case. I just pedal differently, consequently being better going up. I've never done rides as Epic on my Flux as I did on my RFX. Great fun and some of my best memories are on it. I can take it anywhere without reservation.

    And mw/oh, 43 pounds is just crazy and out of the question

    More power to you. I'm a full person and can't do half that you can. That's the human factor destroying the equations.
    Last edited by Jerk_Chicken; 08-08-2008 at 07:19 AM.

  18. #18
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    I have a 05 bighit that weighs a touch over 40lbs. I love riding XC trails with it for about a week straight just because at the end of the week I get on my 5 inch travel jamis that weighs in at 30lbs and it feels sooo light and nimble. I try to do a week of riding the bighit once a month.

  19. #19
    maker of trail
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Perhaps it was in a way too easy to pedal and I was spinning myself out of control and into a burnout. I can now climb on my RFX, perhaps being more controlled, and seemingly longer. 1x9 with only a 32t up front.
    Its funny you mention this, I went to 1X9 with 32 up front, 11-34 on the back, and its made me a much better climber, I find that the granny gear is too easy, you don't maintain momentum and spin out too easy... The trails I ride around here, you need to carry some speed to get up super technical climbs. (or you walk )

  20. #20
    Trent the Bent
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    it's all good

    If you are man enough to pedal the beast and don't hold your friends back then why not? It will teach you better pedaling technique and you will be forced to move around the cockpit more on climbs to keep the front end down, thereby making you more comfortable moving around over your bike. The best part is when you kick your buddies @$$ up the hill he knows he was pnwd. I already have to wait for most of my friends at the top when I ride my 44 lb Faith, so what good is it if I bring my HT and end up waiting even longer? Maybe I need to find faster friends.

  21. #21
    Its got what plants crave
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    I have to say that once I got a 6 inch bike, I thought it was going to be absurd overkill for everything I rode, and actually it was. HOWEVER the only tradeoff was slightly worse climbing mostly due to weight. I can live with that compromise considering I'm having more fun riding a bigger bike than I'd ever had. If the only thing I gain is a little more speed at the top of the climbs, I'm happy with having more travel. My bike weighs mid 30 pounds, not exactly portly, but riding some of those 7+ inch bikes that weigh almost 40 or more might be pretty tough.

  22. #22
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    Weight on this bike is 35 lbs. with 4" on travel on the fork with a hard tail. Seems to be working out fine for me so far. Thanks!

  23. #23
    Some Assembly Required
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    You know, I mentioned recently elsewhere, and I neglected to put it here, but I was riding a 25-26 pound rig right before I got my RFX, at which point I put on ten pounds. What I found was climbing was actually more fun. I think it might boil down to even genetics, on some level, with the type of fibers I have. I was able to get up on the Flux, but I'd die on climbs. Perhaps it was in a way too easy to pedal and I was spinning myself out of control and into a burnout. I can now climb on my RFX, perhaps being more controlled, and seemingly longer. 1x9 with only a 32t up front.

    So the point is it's not necessarily the bike, and of course, one can't overcome the physics of more weight going up against gravity on an angle, but there's the human factor in between that always f*cks every equation up, and perhaps that's where I lie in this case. I just pedal differently, consequently being better going up. I've never done rides as Epic on my Flux as I did on my RFX. Great fun and some of my best memories are on it. I can take it anywhere without reservation.

    And mw/oh, 43 pounds is just crazy and out of the question

    More power to you. I'm a full person and can't do half that you can. That's the human factor destroying the equations.

    Mucho appreciation JC. Don't know what it is about my builds, no matter how good of intentions I have on building a bike lighter than my last ride; it just don't happen. I always give in to using parts that I know can handle the crashes/riding/jumping/drops and end up w/a tank. It does make me a better rider in the long run though. I have found that I like the weight and ability of a heavier bike than I do lighter builds, (high 30's and lower). The lighter bikes feel as though they're gonna fold up under me. Like an old MTX buddy of mine said "I gotta be able to see the ft wheel out in ft of me, otherwise I feel like I'm goin' OTB all of the time". I can't stand a steep ht even though th slacker geo tends to make for wanderin' ft end.

    I do way better with a big granny, it keeps my momentum up and I have better balance and I am waay more effecient....just have plenty of seat time cause a lay off will require a new learning curve, re-educating my legs to climb w/such a big granny.

    BTW, "the human factor will almost always throw a wrench in the equation, to the good or to the bad".
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  24. #24
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    I just took my 40.5 pound Blindside out for a 22 mile jaunt yesterday. Locally there aren't any terrible climbs that I have to deal with and I'm not exactly into going as fast as I can on those types of rides so it isn't too bad at all. I'm also on a 1x9 setup 38t up front and 11-34t in the back. I can manage the short steepish climbs here locally just fine. I mainly ride around looking for cool spots to session like little steep spots, natural drops, mini rock garden etc. Once I find a spot like that I shred it for awhile then move on looking for another fun spot. I would hate to be riding around on a fragile XC bike, find a sweet natural feature and have to ride past it in fear of breaking my bike if I hit it up.

  25. #25
    AW_
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    Long hill climbs hurt regardless of what kind of bike. You just get there faster on a light one. So who cares. The big bike is more fun everywhere else that is worth riding. Where do you want to have the MOST fun on your ride, going uphill or going downhill?

  26. #26
    beautiful jackass
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    Quote Originally Posted by AW_
    Long hill climbs hurt regardless of what kind of bike. You just get there faster on a light one. So who cares. The big bike is more fun everywhere else that is worth riding. Where do you want to have the MOST fun on your ride, going uphill or going downhill?
    This is my philosophy. Why limit yourself in riding? My bike can go anywhere a 20 lb cross-country bike can go, and many places where it cannot.

  27. #27
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    Whatever I say is just going to be what everyone else has already said.

    Run what'cha brung.

    I don't like riding XC rigs anymore...I haven't taken my Fat Chance HT off road in a long time. Plain scary compared to my Bullit or GT.

  28. #28
    StraightOuttaCompton
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    most XC bikes arent made for offroad too much. they are made for like fireroads and some smoothe trails. I wouldnt ride one on any trail at N* except for greens and fireroads
    HARDTAIL PRIDE- 09 Kona Five-0

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djponee
    most XC bikes arent made for offroad too much. they are made for like fireroads and some smoothe trails. I wouldnt ride one on any trail at N* except for greens and fireroads
    I don't know about that...
    Watch the old NSX videos when all they had were those XC bikes...see what kind of stuff they could ride with them.

    I know that I don't have the skills for that.

  30. #30
    TLL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    You know, I mentioned recently elsewhere, and I neglected to put it here, but I was riding a 25-26 pound rig right before I got my RFX, at which point I put on ten pounds. What I found was climbing was actually more fun.
    Yup. I'm much happier on a 33 pound bike than on a 25 pound bike.

    I know a guy that rides his V-10 for everything, and he is one incredible rider. You should see him pedal the thing up a steep hill and pass a dirt roadie. Pretty hilarious.

  31. #31
    aka Jesse Palmer
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    1. Get a heavy ass DH bike and pedal it up all the fireroads you can find. +10 points for every XC weenie you pass going uphill.
    If you are complaining about "suspension bobbing blah blah whine whine" you are doing it wrong. learn to pedal the DH bike smoothly and you will have more efficient pedaling form for the smaller bikes.

    2. get a 5" bike and ride DH trails on that to improve your smoothness

    3. get a sketchy ass xc race bike and ride it everywhere. Be amazed at how fast it goes up hills, and how incredibly sketchballs it is on the way down.

    4. ??????

    5. Profit!!1!!!11!!

  32. #32
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    My trail bike is a five inch travel slightly heavy steed so that when I do happen across an oportunity for catching air there is no fear of breakage...

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