Well, Basically Out For My 2nd Season In A Row, Need Words Of Wisdom- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Well, Basically Out For My 2nd Season In A Row, Need Words Of Wisdom

    Well, when I thought I couldn't out do myself from last years injury (2 concussions in 1 weekend put me out for 6 months), a couple of weeks ago at SGC in Whistler I took a really nasty fall. Lets just say, nasty enough that I don't remember any of the day until about 3/4 of the way to Lions Gate hospital in vancouver from Whistler (and if any of you know don't know Whistler's relation to Vancouver, it's at least 2 hours away from it.) Unfortunately, no one saw the accident, and since i got knocked out I have no idea what happened.

    The result of my crash? I got a minor concussion (thank god for that new DOT helmet, really saved my head), a slightly lacerated spleen, and i shattered my left wrist. After 2 days in Lions Gate, i got myself back to Jersey and last Tuesday had reconstructive surgery on my wrist. I'll attach the x-ray picture of the wrist with this.

    So basically, at this point im starting to question what am I doing wrong, is this not my thing, and should I get out of the sport . I know the falls last season were due to balance issues, and I think what happened was i came off the jump awkwardly and just lost it. So, what do I need to do to get my balance well, balanced heheh. I know I ride front heavy, and it seems that my weight is to the left a bit, I try to focus on this, but it's just not working. Maybe getting some type of riding coach to help too might help when the time comes? Just not sure, so I came to all of you for help.
    Looking forward to some feedback, thanks

    Check out all those screws n plates...heheh
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  2. #2
    I dig trails!
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    Quote Originally Posted by acdcfan1283
    Check out all those screws n plates...heheh
    Ouch.

    Maybe try flow instead of pin it.

    That is what I am going to have to do, that, and give up DH racing.

    It's all good anyway, as flowing a trail makes it much more fun than railing it on the knife's edge.

    Heal up bro.

    P

  3. #3
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    Oh man...

    I can't believe it. Another season out?
    I don't know what to say. I've had a similar experience my first two seasons in college playing soccer. First season it was a fractured ankle and the second was a blown MCL (knee) so I was out two seasons in a row.
    I trained harder and smarter, looking at exactly what I could do to get certain parts of my body in better shape. I also played smarter..I always gave 100% but I wasn't making silly bodily sacrifices (slide tackles, lunging in, etc.) all the time.
    It sounds like you have an idea as to what you want to work on, so prepare to do just that when you get well.
    And never, never give up.

    Feel better, best wishes,

    KAT
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  4. #4
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    It sounds like you're really riding out of your range of ability. It's one thing to push the envelope a bit but another to just tear ass through it like your on a kamikaze mission.

    There's no shame in bypassing a feature, it's not a competition.

    "Ride for tomorrow" - Some of the best advice I've ever been given.

  5. #5
    ride hard take risks
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    Time to back it down as every one is recommending, work on being smooth and consistent speed will come naturally. If you have the funds a riding coach is a excellent idea as long as your willing to listen.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Time to back it down as every one is recommending, work on being smooth and consistent speed will come naturally. If you have the funds a riding coach is a excellent idea as long as your willing to listen.
    thanks for the advice so far guys. i meant to ask...where exactly do i get myself one of those?
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  7. #7
    StraightOuttaCompton
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    heres some words of wisdom, dont get ****ing hurt!!!!!!!!!!
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  8. #8
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by acdcfan1283
    thanks for the advice so far guys. i meant to ask...where exactly do i get myself one of those?
    Lee McCormack has been known to do some coaching, you could ask him for advise in your area.

    http://www.leelikesbikes.com/

    Bike Skills could be another place to ask I would hope.

    http://www.bikeskills.com/home.php

    Lee would be my first choice for advise he is a great person with a wealth of knowledge.
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  9. #9
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    Not remebering 3/4 of a day is not just a minor concussion. But like what they said, tone it dwon a little, don't turn the dial all the way up to 11.

    'Ride for tomorrow' is a good saying. IIRC, you're like 17 or 18 right? If you're shattering wrists and slicin' spleen's then you are gonna make for one heck of a sore old man.

  10. #10
    NICE KID...NICE
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    Damn dude...That blows

    First off.....Heal fast and heal well. I went through a similar problem. I was comming off jumps to the right and to the left. I felt like I had zippy control over the bike after take off. Once I got the right bike and got it set up right, eased my way into it, it seem to come naturally.

    Someone told me...Let the bike do the work That is one thing that has stuck with me and seemed to help.

    Secondly...When it comes time to ride again, if you love it enough, which you probably do, you will know if it is for you because you have had enough experience good and bad to make the right decision.

    Just remember. There are 2 types of riders. Those who have crashed and those who will. Hopefully yours are all out of the way.

    Get well soon brother.

    Wookie
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by acdcfan1283
    thanks for the advice so far guys. i meant to ask...where exactly do i get myself one of those?
    A great coach in your area is Jim Delavalle, he is local and a very knowledgeable, and cool guy. I know that he is coaching for http://www.madmarchracing.com/ but i think that he can offer private coaching too.
    Good luck with your injuries and just enjoy the ride, don't push yourself too much.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Lee McCormack has been known to do some coaching, you could ask him for advise in your area.

    http://www.leelikesbikes.com/

    Bike Skills could be another place to ask I would hope.

    http://www.bikeskills.com/home.php

    Lee would be my first choice for advise he is a great person with a wealth of knowledge.
    thanks for the coaches, greatly appreciated. I'm gonna get in contact with them soon
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pillete
    A great coach in your area is Jim Delavalle, he is local and a very knowledgeable, and cool guy. I know that he is coaching for http://www.madmarchracing.com/ but i think that he can offer private coaching too.
    Good luck with your injuries and just enjoy the ride, don't push yourself too much.
    ahh yes, ive heard of this group. ill try n speak with him too, thanks
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  14. #14
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    Two concussions in one weekend??? Why even try for number two? Seriously, that much damage can lead to a much bigger problem later on (epilepsy). TONE IT DOWN there buddy.

    Oh, and for training. Diablo is doing a training "thingy" this summer. Check out the sticky on the Diablo forum on Ridemonkey.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wookie freeride
    First off.....Heal fast and heal well. I went through a similar problem. I was comming off jumps to the right and to the left. I felt like I had zippy control over the bike after take off. Once I got the right bike and got it set up right, eased my way into it, it seem to come naturally.

    Someone told me...Let the bike do the work That is one thing that has stuck with me and seemed to help.

    Secondly...When it comes time to ride again, if you love it enough, which you probably do, you will know if it is for you because you have had enough experience good and bad to make the right decision.

    Just remember. There are 2 types of riders. Those who have crashed and those who will. Hopefully yours are all out of the way.

    Get well soon brother.

    Wookie
    let the bike do the work...i like that. thanks for that
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by be350ka
    Two concussions in one weekend??? Why even try for number two? Seriously, that much damage can lead to a much bigger problem later on (epilepsy). TONE IT DOWN there buddy.

    Oh, and for training. Diablo is doing a training "thingy" this summer. Check out the sticky on the Diablo forum on Ridemonkey.
    mm well, i didnt know i had the first one...unfortunately
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  17. #17
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    well, get a bike like a nomad or a remedy or something and start doing some AM rides. start climbing up the hills you're riding down, it makes you think about things more before you do them, because the bike isn't up to totally screwing things up left and right! Plus, if you spend three quarters of your time in the granny gear climbing, you're gonna be less likely to eat it huge from riding DH at a resort!

    take it easier, mountain biking is too fun and awesome to give up, don't overlook the other cool parts of the sport because you're so focused on the adrenalin side of things

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Lee McCormack has been known to do some coaching, you could ask him for advise in your area.

    http://www.leelikesbikes.com/

    Bike Skills could be another place to ask I would hope.

    http://www.bikeskills.com/home.php

    Lee would be my first choice for advise he is a great person with a wealth of knowledge.
    +1 on Bikeskills. I attended a ride last year w/ Randy Spangler and another rider (can't remember his name0. I didn't expect to get much out of it but I actually learned a lot. They helped me with my cornering and a few other things. Well worth the time.

  19. #19
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    I was doing the same thing so I decided to ride and not race. I still race but I do not make any attempt to win, I just flow the whole way down, if something feels fast I will go with it, if something is sketchy I will ride it slow or do a go around.

    Funny thing is that I still do pretty good, usually top 10 in expert 19-29

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by William42
    well, get a bike like a nomad or a remedy or something and start doing some AM rides. start climbing up the hills you're riding down, it makes you think about things more before you do them, because the bike isn't up to totally screwing things up left and right! Plus, if you spend three quarters of your time in the granny gear climbing, you're gonna be less likely to eat it huge from riding DH at a resort!

    take it easier, mountain biking is too fun and awesome to give up, don't overlook the other cool parts of the sport because you're so focused on the adrenalin side of things
    mmm, i like this idea. was thinking this as well. good idea, thanks!
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Lee McCormack has been known to do some coaching, you could ask him for advise in your area.

    http://www.leelikesbikes.com/

    Bike Skills could be another place to ask I would hope.

    http://www.bikeskills.com/home.php

    Lee would be my first choice for advise he is a great person with a wealth of knowledge.
    ......

    In October we will have a pro rider do some riding vids Plus once a month we will do a dh weekend and an xc weekend of training...if anyone is interested
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  22. #22
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    sorry to here....7 months was a long time for me to be out...still not fully healed and have rode dh only 8 times since last trip to whistler Aug 12, 2008...

    healing vibes bro
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  23. #23
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    Dude I have beat th' shyte out of my body since I was a lil kid, football, motorcycles, (road and woods), street fighting, prison, traditional karate, free style fighting, mtn biking, etc....I'm 46 y/o now and I can tell you that no matter how much you feel like "Superman" and like you'll never grow old.......you ain't Superman and "IF YOU'RE LUCKY" you'll live to be old enough to feel every bruise, cut, scrape, fracture, sprain, separation, concussion, etc. you have endured through out your WFO life style. Sounds like you might wanna dial it back for a while to give yerself a bit of time for some self evaluation. It sounds like your mindset is headed in this direction already, don't fight it. The day will come when you aren't bouncing back like you once did/are, and God forbid you don't have brain function problems like "old-timers", (Alzheimer's), I say this because you said you couldn't remember 3/4's of the ride to the horse-pistol....could be the norm for you waaaayyy too soon.
    I'm not bustin' yer nuts, I'm sayin' to you; "be realistic". "Been there, done that and know where you're headed".

    Keep it real, and Good Luck....seriously.
    "Why are you willing to take so much & leave others in need...just because you can?"

  24. #24
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    I'm not sure exactly how you ride but saying you went down at Whistler says a lot. Whistler chews people up, not because it is hairy, but even on the blue trails, just because you get much more DH in a day than most people will get in a week, and some in a month. I went down in whistler two years in a row. The first year I separated my left shoulder and was out. The second year I fractured bones in my right foot in three places after four days, rested about a week and a half and then rode for another 6 days, then began about 3.5 months of recovering from all the damage I did riding on a broken foot (stupid, yet seems ok, so worth it). this year I've been too busy for any major MB trips so I've been safe. On both occasions I didn't get hurt doing something beyond my ability level, I got hurt hitting jumps I've hit a million times, but my body was just worn out. I was suffering from hard care wrist pump and muscle fatigue in the arms and legs. Especially when your legs start to give out, any DH trail becomes dangerous. all the little stabilization muscles that usually get worked very little in a normal day biking, get taxed beyond their limits in just half a day of pinning it on a lift serviced mountain.

    Also, most people who come to whistler are encountering trails that are gnarlier, bigger, and more technical than what they have back home. You can step up to the challenges and if you don't go down all the time you can fool yourself into thinking that you aren't riding at the very edge of your ability. Everybody wants to get their money's worth out of their time at whistler, they want to finish the week or so with enough skill so that they can dominate their home trails and jumps. Maybe dial it back a little, take some coaching, and ride, ride, ride. riding everyday will help you dial in your riding, as long as you aren't enforcing bad habits.

    Lastly, if you're winding up with concussions, perhaps you need to think about how you are falling. It's not all that practical to practice falling, but any time you fall you should reflect and think about what you could have done better. Some falls are too instantaneous to do anything reaction wise. but some reflexes you can train yourself for. I think growing up with a trampoline has helped me. If you fall, ask yourself, a) did I properly ditch the bike, most of the falls I've had where I hit my head or just thumped into the ground or hurt my balls were due to me being unable to separate from the bike, on the bike falls are complicated, if you can get off in time, you have more options to protect yourself and a better safety margin. b) did I roll? tucking and rolling especially in OTB situations can save your life. When I separated my shoulder, I was going OTB after overshooting the trannie on one of A-Lines bigger jumps, If I hadn't tucked my head and rolled with the motion I could have broken my neck or back. There may be other things to remember when you fall but those are the most important.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobsterCraw
    I'm not sure exactly how you ride but saying you went down at Whistler says a lot. Whistler chews people up, not because it is hairy, but even on the blue trails, just because you get much more DH in a day than most people will get in a week, and some in a month. I went down in whistler two years in a row. The first year I separated my left shoulder and was out. The second year I fractured bones in my right foot in three places after four days, rested about a week and a half and then rode for another 6 days, then began about 3.5 months of recovering from all the damage I did riding on a broken foot (stupid, yet seems ok, so worth it). this year I've been too busy for any major MB trips so I've been safe. On both occasions I didn't get hurt doing something beyond my ability level, I got hurt hitting jumps I've hit a million times, but my body was just worn out. I was suffering from hard care wrist pump and muscle fatigue in the arms and legs. Especially when your legs start to give out, any DH trail becomes dangerous. all the little stabilization muscles that usually get worked very little in a normal day biking, get taxed beyond their limits in just half a day of pinning it on a lift serviced mountain.

    Also, most people who come to whistler are encountering trails that are gnarlier, bigger, and more technical than what they have back home. You can step up to the challenges and if you don't go down all the time you can fool yourself into thinking that you aren't riding at the very edge of your ability. Everybody wants to get their money's worth out of their time at whistler, they want to finish the week or so with enough skill so that they can dominate their home trails and jumps. Maybe dial it back a little, take some coaching, and ride, ride, ride. riding everyday will help you dial in your riding, as long as you aren't enforcing bad habits.

    Lastly, if you're winding up with concussions, perhaps you need to think about how you are falling. It's not all that practical to practice falling, but any time you fall you should reflect and think about what you could have done better. Some falls are too instantaneous to do anything reaction wise. but some reflexes you can train yourself for. I think growing up with a trampoline has helped me. If you fall, ask yourself, a) did I properly ditch the bike, most of the falls I've had where I hit my head or just thumped into the ground or hurt my balls were due to me being unable to separate from the bike, on the bike falls are complicated, if you can get off in time, you have more options to protect yourself and a better safety margin. b) did I roll? tucking and rolling especially in OTB situations can save your life. When I separated my shoulder, I was going OTB after overshooting the trannie on one of A-Lines bigger jumps, If I hadn't tucked my head and rolled with the motion I could have broken my neck or back. There may be other things to remember when you fall but those are the most important.
    basically all you said really hits the nail on the head. it was my 4th day in a row (riding in SGC) and a combo of muscle fatigue/carelessness was the reason. i didnt feel too tired however, for whatever reason that may be. Really appreciate your long post, gives me a lot of food for thought. thanks a bunch
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobsterCraw
    ...Whistler chews people up, not because it is hairy, but even on the blue trails, just because you get much more DH in a day than most people will get in a week, and some in a month...
    Amen! When I went down in Whistler with SGC (same week as original poster) it was my 7th or 8th time hitting up the biker cross course... and consequently be it due to muscle fatigue or general lack of focus I ate it hard on the second to last table at the end resulting in...
    stiches in the nose
    hole in the shoulder
    general cuts and bruises
    more than likely concussion
    cracked giro remedy (only 3 days old ((NEW)) at that point)
    SUCKS

    Heal up dude, we need to hit up Diablo -- I went today!!

  27. #27
    aka Jesse Palmer
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    Maybe a pump track and some dirt jumps in the back yard

  28. #28
    ride hard take risks
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    RC has great input on his experience but we are all different he isnt knocking himself out. When you knock your self out you destroy brain cells and they do not come back. Just like boxing or contact sports you take out the legs then the arms and the rest falls easily. Your possibly better off with you idea of a coach even if for a week solid you will learn allot.
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  29. #29
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    Most people have an instinctual balance of skill/fear. Sounds like you could use a little more fear to keep you from going beyond youre skill level. You don't have to be afraid of the injury itself, just the reality of being off your bike and saddled with medical bills. Progress slowly, wear body armor, and try to bail gracefuly.

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