Summer Gravity camps for adults- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Summer Gravity camps for adults

    Anyone have any experience with the camp? My wife and I are thinking about going this summer.

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    I'm headed up this year for the second adult week. I'd like some more info as well.

  3. #3
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    That's been on my wish list for a long time. Please guys, do a write-up when you get back so I can sell it to the household financier!

  4. #4
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    I did it a few years ago. Best week of DH riding I have ever had. I would sell a kidney to go again! Is there anything in particular that you want to know about the camp?

  5. #5
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    It's pretty awesome. I've been 5 times in the past 6 years. The best vacation I could ask for! It's nice to ride with people at your skill level and be guided by a pro. You don't have to worry about hitting a trail for the first time or be all sketched out cause the coaches know what you're capable of and they aren't going to take you anywhere you can't handle, yet they're always pushing and challenging you. Midweek they'll probably offer a heli-drop. It's pretty cool starting a ride up on top of a mountain on a glacier, but the trail down kind of blows... It's pretty much just rutted out fall line stuff. Unless you've never been in a helicopter and want to see your bike dangle thousands of feet in the air, I'd pass. Take a rest day or ride some XC or pumptrack or something, cause you'll need a break from the park at that point. You'll pretty much have blood blisters all over your hands from 30 laps a day, unless you've already been dh'ing ALOT. The air dome is super fun, a little bit street course and then the foam pit of course. Jordie is usually good for a couple beers while hanging out there for a couple hours. You'll be throwing tail whips and 3's in no time.

    If I was you, I'd find my own accomodations up there though. Either through VRBO or AirBNB. The Tantalaus Lodge is okay for kids and young adults, but it's kind of ghetto for more mature audiences.

    Just remember to hold back the first few days. It's super easy get over confident and too loose while following those guys around. Let you're guard down for a second and the next thing you know you're on the ground... About 10% of people are out after the first 3 days.
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  6. #6
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    I am just curious about the level of the coaching. Every coach there is a spectacular rider but can they coach? There is a huge difference between the two. I saw a how to vid by one of the coaches and he is so vague about re skill he is teaching that it was basically useless. I am hoping the rest of the coaches aren't the same. Teaching the skills progressively would be a good thing. I attended the coed trek dirt series course in whistler and those coaches are great. They taught those skills small steps. I spoke to a girl I know in town who was at the camp and she said their coach took them down the GLC without any coaching at all. The coach just had them train the jump. One of the gals in the group ended up in the hospital after that!

    But my wife and I are attending the camp and we are hoping for a good time. I'll definitely tweet and write up a review as I go along. We ate going back to the trek dirt series coed camp in July and September so I'll have something for that as well.

    Andy

  7. #7
    MattSavage
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    Quote Originally Posted by coiler_guy
    I am just curious about the level of the coaching. Every coach there is a spectacular rider but can they coach?


    Andy
    Shandro does a pretty good job of finding people that can communicate well, not just ride well.

    Some of them are super good. Katrina, Lorainne, Joe Schwartz, Shandro, Vanderham, Watson... They're really good. Morland, Cho, Billinghurst are fun to ride with and pretty good coaches, they like to say "just follow me off it..." Kyle Jamieson is super fun to ride with and a super cool guy, but he could work on his teaching/communication skills a little. He's best for those days you just wanna make fun laps, go fast (not really stop and work on technique or study a feature) cause he knows the fun lines. Most of the other coaches mentioned on the website are only there for one or two sessions and usually not the adult week. The kids like the dj/slopestyle guys more I think. Edit: I shouldn't have singled out Jamieson that way. He's a great coach too, I just went in my order of Best-Good experiences, there is no Bad experience there!

    Karina and Lorainne are my favorite. They're ladies, they teach well, they rip, and they know all the other chicks on the mountain so there's lots of talking to other ladies in line or on the chair...

    Also, with all these coaches, there's lots of opportunity for beer drinking and boozing afterwards...
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  8. #8
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    I did one of theTrek series camps last year and it was extremely helpful. 3 different coaches (switched off @ half day) in 2 days and I had at least 2 light bulb moments that alone made the camp worth the $, not to mention the swag I got (tshirt, socks, grips, RF knee/shin armor). If you do their last one of the year (in Sept. last year) they sell off all their gear and loaner bikes pretty cheap too.

  9. #9
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    Are there any instructors that fly out to other locations to do camps (they all seem to be in CA, CO, or Canada).

    I'm into tech diving and several organizations do that (GUE and UDT). Get the guys together for the class, contact the instructor and he'll fly (or drive) to your location to give the class. Of course you have to pay for the instructors flight and hotel but that is split between all those in the class so it is not as bad.

    Scuba diving is nowhere near as popular as mtb is so it would seem there could be a huge money making opportunity if it was done. Most areas have some sort of trail systems where basics could be taught.

    Anyone know of such an outfit?
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  10. #10
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    Mattsavage- roughly how many riders were in your group and did the size just depend on the level?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie B
    Mattsavage- roughly how many riders were in your group and did the size just depend on the level?
    They keep the group size to about 6 or less people. They group you together by skill level but you are not chained to a group. You can ride with friends or if a group does not match your skill lever you can switch.
    As for the coaches I found that the three I rode with were all positive, constructive coaches.
    If you get a chance to do the heli-drop on Rainbow Mountain it is a must!

  12. #12
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    I was thinking about hitting that one, but the price! Does anyone know how the 'Richie Schley's Mountain Bike Adventure' camp is? It's only on the weekend and leaves the rest of the week open for riding on your own. Thanks, Fahn
    Hubbard Bike Club

  13. #13
    MattSavage
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ollie B
    Mattsavage- roughly how many riders were in your group and did the size just depend on the level?
    On average, 6-7. The less experienced groups were a little larger at times, the most advanced, maybe 2-3.
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

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  14. #14
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    While I have no experience with the camp, definitely consider all of the options. There are a lot of instructors in town!

    In the early season it's $319 for a full day private lesson with a coach employed by Whistler Blackcomb, and there are some extremely talented coaches/riders working there!

    For the price, you could have 5-6 days (I'm sure if you booked a week you could get a deal for the same price as SGC) and it would be one on one lessons.

    Granted you don't get to ride with the big names, but just thought it would be worth mentioning some of the options.

    Also Camp of Champions could be worth looking at too. I know their groups are a lot smaller and their price is a fair bit cheaper.

  15. #15
    MattSavage
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFahn
    I was thinking about hitting that one, but the price! Does anyone know how the 'Richie Schley's Mountain Bike Adventure' camp is? It's only on the weekend and leaves the rest of the week open for riding on your own. Thanks, Fahn

    I think the price is worth it. Two meals a day, lodging, potentially several hundreds in free swag, lots of beer, memories, no wait in the lift line, etc... I only get one vacation a year, I'm not rich, but I don't want to half ass it either, so to me this is going all out. Still less than an all inclusive Mexico or Caribbean trip.

    I've heard the Schley camp is good. A good way to go if you have your own lodging and are there for only a week or and want some free time to do other things as well.
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattsavage
    I think the price is worth it. Two meals a day, lodging, potentially several hundreds in free swag, lots of beer, memories, no wait in the lift line, etc... I only get one vacation a year, I'm not rich, but I don't want to half ass it either, so to me this is going all out. Still less than an all inclusive Mexico or Caribbean trip.

    I've heard the Schley camp is good. A good way to go if you have your own lodging and are there for only a week or and want some free time to do other things as well.
    That's cool. I hear where you're coming from. None of us have the 2.5g's though (at minimum) to throw into this camp not to mention the flight and car rental too ($700+300). Plus we'd like the free time to chose if we wanted a day off to try Vancouver or maybe some XC/AM stuff. Ttyl, Fahn
    Hubbard Bike Club

  17. #17
    MattSavage
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFahn
    That's cool. I hear where you're coming from. None of us have the 2.5g's though (at minimum) to throw into this camp not to mention the flight and car rental too ($700+300). Plus we'd like the free time to chose if we wanted a day off to try Vancouver or maybe some XC/AM stuff. Ttyl, Fahn

    Oh, yeah, didn't consider all that. I just drive up from Portland. I guess I'm moderately spoiled...
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  18. #18
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    I just paid for my place in the 2nd week Adult camp of SGC. Can't wait! Me and a buddy are coming from the East coast USA (North Carolina). We're arriving two days before the camp and staying two days after. Flying in to Vancouver and taking Pacific Coach Lines to/from Whiz.

    It'll be my first trip to Whistler and I'm SO stoked! My biggest concern right now is how to pack the bike and all my gear and stay under the airline's size/weight regulations. I have no idea how that's going to work. FF helmet, Leatt brace, body armor, arm/leg/knee pads, extra set of tires, a few tools, ... Ugg! I'll never get it to fit!

  19. #19
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    FYI there is a limited supply of tools and an air compressor at GBB if you can't fit them in.

    Plus the shops are pretty good if you just rock up and ask to borrow an allen key for 2 minutes.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by snojcb
    My biggest concern right now is how to pack the bike and all my gear and stay under the airline's size/weight regulations. I have no idea how that's going to work. FF helmet, Leatt brace, body armor, arm/leg/knee pads, extra set of tires, a few tools, ... Ugg! I'll never get it to fit!
    What airline?
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

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  21. #21
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    Pretty stoked! Just signed up for the 2nd adult camp 7-14th. Think my turner highline will b enough bike?

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    i went last year and i am going again this year. First adult week.

    I went up with my girl. I have been to whistler 5 times prior for week stays. I decided to take my girl to the camp so we would both be happy riding and learning. I race cat1 19-29 and this was her second time at a lift access place. It was a great idea, she got to learn with Katrina and and Loraine all week. I got to chase around the young kids and coaches down everything i wanted. We would meet up after camp and rip a few runs, have a beer, go to the hot tub, ect.

    The groups for advanced riders were smaller, my group was 4-5 + coach. The other groups were 6 mostly. Be vocal if you think you are in a the wrong group or want to do something other than what the group wants. Some of the people only want to rip dirty merchant and aline. If thats not your steeze, talk to shandro, he will put you in a group that you want to be in. After all, you paid a lot of money and they want you to have a great time. I hopped groups during the week just trying to find out what was right for me.

    No heli last year as the snowpack was still pretty high, this year i am going to guess the same as whistler had the 2nd biggest snowfall on record.

    Some coaches had stronger points than others. I rode with wade, Lorraine, cho, kyle, cho, Lorraine. I learned the most from Lorraine. The most fun riding was with kyle.

    You meet a ton of new people that just love to ride, provided lunch and breakfast ( they get old by the last day tho), some good schwag, ect

    The highline will be plenty bike.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by turborobo View Post
    Pretty stoked! Just signed up for the 2nd adult camp 7-14th. Think my turner highline will b enough bike?
    Took the Highline last summer on my first trip. It was plenty of bike, but I do have a 40 on it. I would like to try a true DH bike next time I'm there.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by turborobo View Post
    Pretty stoked! Just signed up for the 2nd adult camp 7-14th. Think my turner highline will b enough bike?
    As long as you're not trying to race Morland or Stevie Smith down Whistler Downhill, you should fine...

    +1 on Lorraine and Katrina... They're seriously the most confience inspiring coaches there. Stuff you might find yourself edging up to and rolling into, they'll have you pre-jumping and airing into in no time, totally opening up new lines! It's so awesome...
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by turborobo View Post
    Pretty stoked! Just signed up for the 2nd adult camp 7-14th. Think my turner highline will b enough bike?
    I've been there with my Highline, and I believe is the "perfect bike" for whistler! ....is freeride, not DH racing, my set up was a t the time; totem and a pushed DHX coil, have fun!

  26. #26
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    Dream vacation

    The only time I got to Whistler was among the best trips of my life. This would be my dream vacation for sure.
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    Here's a quick followup on the trip to SGC.

    It was killer! Shandro puts on a great package and you won't be let down at all. Seriously, if you're on the fence about it, or if it even catches your interest, you should make the investment in yourself to go.

    I ended up going with 5 of my riding buddies and we all had a blast. We all rode together every day and learned more than we could have expected. Coaching on: riding position, foot/pedal interaction, line selection, jumping, suspension, the list goes on and on. All of the coaching was informative and constructive. Besides the verbal input, it was a lesson in itself to follow the coaches down the mountain and learn what they look for on the trail and how they attack it.

    Go do it! You'll wonder why you didn't before.

    My only gripe- I rented my bike through Performance Bike Rentals in Whistler and they were surprisingly rude. They were quite unorganized and for the most part didn't really seem too interested in keeping their renters happy. When I go back, I'll find a different place to get a bike.

    If you guys have any questions about the camp, fire away.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by snojcb View Post
    I just paid for my place in the 2nd week Adult camp of SGC. Can't wait! Me and a buddy are coming from the East coast USA (North Carolina). We're arriving two days before the camp and staying two days after. Flying in to Vancouver and taking Pacific Coach Lines to/from Whiz.

    It'll be my first trip to Whistler and I'm SO stoked! My biggest concern right now is how to pack the bike and all my gear and stay under the airline's size/weight regulations. I have no idea how that's going to work. FF helmet, Leatt brace, body armor, arm/leg/knee pads, extra set of tires, a few tools, ... Ugg! I'll never get it to fit!
    go here and check what I posted
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  29. #29
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    how much are the camps...discounts for 2??

    link to website
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

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    I agree with everything mbell said. I was there for the second Adult session this year. It was better than I expected. I had taken a 3-day camp with Mad March Racing last year at Snowshoe and learned a lot. With a week long camp at Whistler, I learned a lot more.

    The two camps were very different. With MMR, we started from scratch and everyone learned the basics - body position, cornering position, emergency stop, feather brakes, etc... On paper, I thought it was going to be boring and a waste of my time. However, I learned a LOT from MMR. When we start out, we all teach ourselves the "basics" and, more often than not, we're simply wrong and develop bad habits. This camp was a great opportunity to learn the subtleties of proper downhilling and start unlearning all those bad things I thought I was doing right.

    That was in 2010. In 2011, I splurged and went to SGC. They were quite different in their teaching style. We ate breakfast, did some introductions and just hit the trail. On the trail we would stop and talk about cornering, body position, line selection or scout a particular hairy feature. Then hurl yourself at the trail again and hope you can remember what was just said. Of course, you'd get feedback from the coach as you're riding, but still - not much time for it to sink in.

    At the MMR camp, we practiced on a grassy field. At SGC, we practiced on the trails. Vastly different approaches to teaching, and both with their merit.

    In the end, I'm very glad to have taken both, and I'm very glad to have taken them in that order.

    The other decision I was really happy with is that I arrived at Whistler 2 days early. This gave me time to get used to the DH bike again, work out any mechanical problem, and get familiar with the trails a little. Once camp started, I was already warmed up and ready to roll.

    Here's a little vid I put together to summarize what the SGC camp meant to me:

    <iframe width="560" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/lWT8_g618IA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    Oh, and the SGC had scheduled time in the AirDome and with the AcroBag. Here's a short vid of my hurling myself at the air bag.

    <iframe width="560" height="345" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/k3kwoJYCLqI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    That was a nice perk!

  31. #31
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    That video was AMAZING !!!!

    I must get to Whistler ASAP. Is it worth paying for the camp for someone who is intermediate and doesn't want to stop too often ?

  32. #32
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    The Camp is totally worth it!!! I also just got done with the 2nd week of the adult camp, I will be going back for sure next year! I probably learned more in the week of camp than I would have in a year of riding on my own, totally pushed me out of my comfort level and made me progress as a rider.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by turborobo View Post
    The Camp is totally worth it!!! I also just got done with the 2nd week of the adult camp, I will be going back for sure next year! I probably learned more in the week of camp than I would have in a year of riding on my own, totally pushed me out of my comfort level and made me progress as a rider.
    Right on, I've been clearing 5 ft gaps. It would be nice for someone to guide me to the next level instead of just throwing myself off bigger jumps without much of a plan.

    The foam Pit and air bag is a big selling point for me.... hope it will give me the confidence to try some aerial moves.

  34. #34
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    this is pretty cool... but pricey...

  35. #35
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    Thanks for the info. I have been thinking about trying it next year.
    I see the light at the end of the tunnel now,
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  36. #36
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    lift pass and camp 1900.00...is a lot
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS View Post
    lift pass and camp 1900.00...is a lot
    Ouch..... to much ! Unless of course I'm biking with a bunch of hot chicks in bikinis... now 1900 sounds a bit more reasonable

    I'd rather buy a lift pass for a pro on this site and he can give me the pointers I'm looking for,

    Peace,
    Griff

  39. #39
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    I also considered just paying an ex-pro rider (like Shaums March) to ride with me for a few days and get one-on-one coaching. I do think that's a viable alternative. However, there are some "perks" one needs to consider when looking at camp prices. The base camp price (no lift pass, no accommodations) is $1600. It includes:

    * Multiple coaches (so you get input from different types of pro riders)
    * Small groups (up to 6 riders per coach. We had 5 in our group most of the time)
    * Coaching for 6 full days.
    * Exclusive AirDome access with coaching and loaner bikes.
    * This year we had the AcroBag as well.
    *** Breakfast buffet and lunch included for 6 days (consider a meal is about $15, that's worth around $180).
    *** Dinner included the first night. (That's another $25)
    * SGC T-shirt
    * SGC Jersey
    * SGC Backpack
    * SGC Hat
    * A chance to win some sweet swag at the end of the trip (chain guides, complete SAINT brake set, Wii, POC goggles, and a some other stuff)

    So subtract all that from the $1600 and then compare that to paying a pro rider for a few days of lessons. You'll be surprisingly close to the same amount and you get a full week of coaching. At least that's how I justified the expense.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS View Post
    lift pass and camp 1900.00...is a lot
    Plus airfare, bike airline fees or bike rental, yep, that's a lot of $.
    Do you feel lucky? do you, punk?- Dirty Harry

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by lalocotequinta View Post
    Plus airfare, bike airline fees or bike rental, yep, that's a lot of $.
    and hotel accommodations, and shuttle/rental car back and forth from airport...and other dinners ...easily pushes it over 2500
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

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    You easily spend $2k for a long weekend at a resort and leave with nothing but a sunburn and hangover. It totally sounds worth $2500 for 6 days.

  43. #43
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    thought I revive this thread... any reviews for SGC... planning for 2012... thanks

  44. #44
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    I went this last summer and it was an amazing time. We hit all aspects of the Mtn and the coaches were killer. Andrew puts on a great camp and doesn't miss much. If I could pull it off, I'd go again next summer. I seriously doubt you'll be let down if you head up. You'll hands will be seriously sore from riding so much. I'm in pretty good shape and I felt it in my hands for about a month and a half after getting home.

  45. #45
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    Would I be out of place if I am attending alone... My buddies are not likely to make it... Does anyone have the 7 days itineary... I have just registered online with SGC adult week 1... My highlight for 2012...

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    Absolutely nothing wrong with attending alone. You'll have a great time.

    The itinerary is based on your skill level. First day you will be grouped with riders who lost themselves at the same skill level as you. Your coach will take you for the day and assess your true skill level and also work on fundamental skills.
    After day one, you groups will be adjusted to accommodated riders to match all people in their group. When i was there, there were groups that were expert level, all the way to a group of guys that Judy wanted to get down a run without crashing once.
    You will ride all day every day. Rain or shine. You will also rotate coaches each day and learn completely different skills from each coach too. Mostly though, the coaches will do whatever you want. (jumping, technical, top to bottom rubs, etc). No matter what though, they're always watching you rude and giving you incredible feedback.
    Besides trail riding , you'll hit the pump track, air done, and the acrobag (insanely cool and scarrier than crap).
    Breakfast an lunch are taken care of each day- the food is served at the restaurant and the bottom of the lifts. Food is decent, with a buffet every morning and about 10 choices for lunch.
    Either bring your real deal DH bike, or just rent a good one there. Trust me, don't bring your bike if your on the fence about it. Just nut up and rent a top notch bike there. I rode a Session 88 all week and dug it. You'll need the best bike out there to be able to make it a complete week. Part of why you get so many runs in, is that you skip the lift line each run. That alone saves about a half an hour each run.

    I'm stoked for you to go. I would go back up in a heartbeat.

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    Hi mbell... Thanks for your feed back... I am riding with 180 front n 160 back... Don't think will rent a dh bike.... Will be coming in from Asia... Air ticket itself is costly... Did u get the package with accommodation... Really Stoke!! I think I'll do a count down calendar!! But not looking forward to the 19 hrs flight....

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    This looks quite awesome...

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    Quote Originally Posted by specialmint View Post
    Hi mbell... Thanks for your feed back... I am riding with 180 front n 160 back... Don't think will rent a dh bike.... Will be coming in from Asia... Air ticket itself is costly... Did u get the package with accommodation... Really Stoke!! I think I'll do a count down calendar!! But not looking forward to the 19 hrs flight....

    Yes, I got the complete package. If I did it again, (I mean, WHEN...), I'll probably upgrade my hotel to something like the Westin. The Tantalus is OK, but nothing special. Also, if you're traveling alone, you might want to save you money and splurge for your own room.

    I've gotta be honest with you on your bike (180x160). Leave it at home. Not trying to be rude, but just show up, rent a bike, thrash it as hard as you can, and then leave it there. The bikes on the Mtn are set up for good riding and you'll be bummed if you lug your bike all the way over there and end up having to rent anyway because you're restricted by your bike. This is one of those things where you'll just need to trust me on this.

    Fire away with the questions.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbell View Post
    Yes, I got the complete package. If I did it again, (I mean, WHEN...), I'll probably upgrade my hotel to something like the Westin. The Tantalus is OK, but nothing special. Also, if you're traveling alone, you might want to save you money and splurge for your own room.

    I've gotta be honest with you on your bike (180x160). Leave it at home. Not trying to be rude, but just show up, rent a bike, thrash it as hard as you can, and then leave it there. The bikes on the Mtn are set up for good riding and you'll be bummed if you lug your bike all the way over there and end up having to rent anyway because you're restricted by your bike. This is one of those things where you'll just need to trust me on this.

    Fire away with the questions.
    Ok thanks for the advise.... It did cross my mind to rent a bike... Yup I will be getting my own room... Also I just registered n was advise that whistler will charge the whole amount now to my credit card... Is this the standard practise....

  51. #51
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    Damn your one lucky person lol, wish i could go to one of these.. Too bad i cant find anything like this on the eastcoast in NJ ..Keep us updated and get lots of video !

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    Quote Originally Posted by specialmint View Post
    Ok thanks for the advise.... It did cross my mind to rent a bike... Yup I will be getting my own room... Also I just registered n was advise that whistler will charge the whole amount now to my credit card... Is this the standard practise....
    I' pretty sure they charged my whole trip at registration. It a completely legit program and you shouldn't be concerned about anything.
    Start working out your forearms and hands, you'll be glad you did.

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    Specialmint: Im going to the 1st adult camp as well and i am super lit up! i am an XC rider so this will be my first experience with DH/FR and im looking forward to it quite a bit, but will start in the novice groups, just to be safe and learn as much as possible. i signed up for the tantalus lodge so i will likely be sharing space with somebody. and im gonna rent since i doubt my XC davinci would surive the week.

    to anybody else who has attended, should i get my own full face helemt? or do they provide them? and what about other armor? i have some race face elbow pads but beyond that i dont have much. what are peoples feelings/thoughts on the pad/helmet sitch?
    Last edited by Cinsev; 01-21-2012 at 09:33 AM.

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    okay i have heard that my race fave zero arms are probably bunk for DH, so any other input people have will be gladly accepted!

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    When I went, I brought all of my own equipment. (Helmet, armored undershorts, elbows, knee/shins, chest/shoulder) I wasn't interested in wearing a gear that has been worn by other people.
    A few in my group chose to use the equipment that the shop provided, and they were happy with they were given.
    Since, I've gone, I now own a Leatt brace too. I could go on and on about safety equipment, but ultimately, do whats best for you. Once I got there and started pushing myself.. I almost went out and got a Leatt while up there.

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    Sweet thanks for the input man. ill be sure to get some new gear, im 100% new to DH so i figure why not take it as safely as possible? any recommendations on a Full face and pads? i currently use race face zero elbow protection and a giro hex XC helmet. the hex was the only helmet that would fit my huge melon at the shop i was at. haha

    can you tell im stoked? and only 6 months away! hahaha

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    Here's what I've got:

    6'1", 210lbs

    Giro Remedy Helmet (I have an enormous head. I got a large and it's great) (Chainlove)
    Rock Gardnz Flak Jacket (Jenson, 100 bucks), chest, shoulder, spine and elbow protection. I prefer the elbows from this set over my fox elbows.
    Rock Gardnz armored shorts
    Fox knee/shins. I forget the name, but they're ok.
    Leatt Brace (Huck-n-Roll, it was on sale)

    Even if you don't get a Leatt, make sure that any chest/shoulder combo is Leatt compatible. (You'll get one eventually)

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    haha sounds like thats how i will be rolling then, im 6 foot 1, 208lbs.

    yeah i dont doubt it on the leatt. i have been looking at them already, i am obviously way low on gear for this upcoming trek. how about hydration?

    is your remedy fiber or carbon? thank for all the answers it helps me alot and only gets me more hyped. then i can use all this stuff at blue mountain!

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    I brought my camelback and wore it instead of the spine protector on my body armor. You won't need to run a bunch of water in your pack, since you'll ride and then hit the lift. At the bottom of the lift, there is always a water fountain. Mostly, I wore mine for access to my camera, etc.

    My Remedy is fiber, and it's great. Light enough for me (my head probably weighs about 50lbs). I've never had a complaint with it.

    PM me your email address and I'll send you my excessively pathetic packing list on excel. It's kinda comical.

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    if you do decide to rent equipment like helmet and pads,,, most of the shops have a god selection, and as far as i know they are sprayed with a disinfectant / sanitising type spray when handed back at the end of the day,
    if you are going to buy helmet and pads, (that would be my personal choice) then i would advise you to try before you buy, specially with a fullface helmet, they need to fit perfect,
    for the bike park i wear full face lid goggles,elbows knees and gloves, i also have an evoc freeride trailpack with built in spine protector, i am toying with the idea of a neckbrace,
    i also carry enough tools in my pack to fix my bike should anything break, multi tool with allem keys 2-8mm chain tool screwdriver heads spoke keys and tyre levers,
    small adjustable spanner, (this has saved us a few times, when some one in the group has bent a rotor,)
    a coupple of puncture repair kits, spare tubes and a pump.
    spare gear cable.
    food, fluids, jumper and a packlight event waterproof coat. lol and that's me travelling light,
    good luck and enjoy your camp

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    delirian: thanks man that really helps! and its better to be prepped than not right? i have decided to at least go for the FF helmet, but being in toronto there arent alot of places around that sell protective gear so im hoping the large giro will fit the same as my large giro hex......

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbell View Post
    Here's what I've got:

    6'1", 210lbs

    Giro Remedy Helmet (I have an enormous head. I got a large and it's great) ()
    Rock Gardnz Flak Jacket (Jenson, 100 bucks), chest, shoulder, spine and elbow protection. I prefer the elbows from this set over my fox elbows.
    Rock Gardnz armored shorts
    Fox knee/shins. I forget the name, but they're ok.
    Leatt Brace (Huck-n-Roll, it was on sale)

    Even if you don't get a Leatt, make sure that any chest/shoulder combo is Leatt compatible. (You'll get one eventually)
    Hi Cinsev. Glad to know at least someone tat is going up. I used to ride xc too. But moved to trail/Fr/DH. I do have a ff helmet very important. Just wondering how r the prices of the bike shops in whistler. R they over priced for tourist. As I was thinking to get a next brace there.

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    If you're serious about getting a neck brace, just get it now. The last thing you'll want to be doing is taking time out of your day to go shopping while you're up there. The conversion rate may not be in your favor either. Make sure you bring all of the extra parts to your brace when you go- Shandros guys will help make sure it fire correctly to your body.

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    Specialmint: im looking forward to meeting you! you mentioned you are going to the first week? what group will you be in? novice, intermediate, or the higher ones?

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinsev View Post
    delirian: thanks man that really helps! and its better to be prepped than not right? i have decided to at least go for the FF helmet, but being in toronto there arent alot of places around that sell protective gear so im hoping the large giro will fit the same as my large giro hex......
    Try pinkbike. There are lots of ppl selling stuff close to TO. You should have a pressure suit, FF helmet, knee pads and preferably a neck brace. Esp if you aren't used to the big mountains. Protective gear is well worth the $$.

    On Pinkbike, you can prob get a lot of good deal. The Leatt, I just bought a DBX comp II for like $269 from PricePoint.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by specialmint View Post
    Hi Cinsev. Glad to know at least someone tat is going up. I used to ride xc too. But moved to trail/Fr/DH. I do have a ff helmet very important. Just wondering how r the prices of the bike shops in whistler. R they over priced for tourist. As I was thinking to get a next brace there.
    mate,,,, whistler is a foooooooooooooooooooooookin rip off, expect to pay well over the odds for everything, food, beer, everyday groceries, bikes, bike related parts. you can get discounts if you ask. locals price/discount is usually arround 20% so thats what you want to be aiming for...
    personally if you can, i would purchase everything before you go.
    there are some great deals / bargains to be had at the end of season last week september first week october, but at the begining of the season expect to pay top whack,

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinsev View Post
    delirian: thanks man that really helps! and its better to be prepped than not right? i have decided to at least go for the FF helmet, but being in toronto there arent alot of places around that sell protective gear so im hoping the large giro will fit the same as my large giro hex......
    no worries matey,,,,
    to be honest if your just riding the bikepark and your guided, then chances are the guides will have everything required to fix mechanicals / punctures ect, and your never really that far from help.

    i tend to learn the hard way lol, learn from my mistakes. we have all been there lol. out on the moors, lights fading fast final descent, bangs pssssssssssssssst down goes tyre, no pump spare tube or patch kit, lol. que long walk balk to car, gets home hit's chainreaction website orders said parts, lol.
    few weeks later similar scenario, pop bang pssssssssst ha ha you little bugger i am ready for you, out comes new pump and punture kit,lol. up and mobile again in no time.
    on the climb back up, my brother snaps his chain, yep you guessed it, no spare link and no tools. luckily it was near the top of the hill, and its down hill back to the car,
    only problem now. we spent that much time trying to bodge the chain, it's now dark, and yep you guessed it, no lights.
    not to mention how cold it was starting to get, ( yep again you got it,,, no jumper or coat lol)
    so when we get home, back onto the trusty old internet, pedros multi tool. jumper and windproof coat, and some lights lol.
    so now you can see why i carry so much lol.. especially when i am out on holiday in whistler,,,, i would rather take out too much crap and not need it than get caught in the wilds without lol...
    what was the scouts motto again, lol always be prepared,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinsev View Post
    Specialmint: im looking forward to meeting you! you mentioned you are going to the first week? what group will you be in? novice, intermediate, or the higher ones?
    I think I have registered for intermediate... 6 more months to go!!

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    Ah well! still cool to know another person who will be attending! even if we wont be riding together


    due to all the adivce i have been getting here i have ordered a new rockgardenz helm and knee and shin armor! we shall she ig buying before trying was wise.

  70. #70
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    You should look into the Trek Dirt Series.. They have a few different camps, xc to dh. The coaches are fantastic and lots of fun to ride with. They only have a couple of co-ed camps every year so you would have to find out when they are. Generally the co-ed camps are at Whistler. The camp was great you can do both xc and dh each day.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cinsev View Post
    Ah well! still cool to know another person who will be attending! even if we wont be riding together


    due to all the adivce i have been getting here i have ordered a new rockgardenz helm and knee and shin armor! we shall she ig buying before trying was wise.
    i have recnently purchased some rockgrdn knee pads,,, they are great pads,,,, very comfortable to wear,,,,, though they slip down when worn over tights lol... (well it is winter over here in the uk lol, and i have to keep warm lol) dont worry about not knowing anyone,,, you will have lots of friends within the first hour, good luck and enjoy your camp

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by theflu View Post
    You should look into the Trek Dirt Series.. They have a few different camps, xc to dh. The coaches are fantastic and lots of fun to ride with. They only have a couple of co-ed camps every year so you would have to find out when they are. Generally the co-ed camps are at Whistler. The camp was great you can do both xc and dh each day.

    my mate casey coaches for them,,, they are great camps, ! but please corect me if i am wrong, ( and appologies if i am) but arent the trek dirt series women only camps, women guided/coached by women,! in a relaxed friendly and male free enviroment,

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    if they ever have a trek dirt series in ontario then sure, but it makes less sense for me to fly to whistler for only two days. though it does sound pretty rad. its a good thing to know about.

  74. #74
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    has anybody tried the Richey Schley's camps?I know is a weekend long, but is also way cheaper....

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirian View Post
    my mate casey coaches for them,,, they are great camps, ! but please corect me if i am wrong, ( and appologies if i am) but arent the trek dirt series women only camps, women guided/coached by women,! in a relaxed friendly and male free enviroment,
    Yep that's exactly right. At least now I know what days there will be a plethora of women on the trails at WP!

  76. #76
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    We did Schleys camp last year and liked it a lot. It gives you time to explore the mtn yourself and hit some different stuff too. We did a day of XC riding there and had a great time. You'll learn a lot in two days also.ttyl, Fahn
    Hubbard Bike Club

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFahn View Post
    We did Schleys camp last year and liked it a lot. It gives you time to explore the mtn yourself and hit some different stuff too. We did a day of XC riding there and had a great time. You'll learn a lot in two days also.ttyl, Fahn
    thanks, I think is a good deal too...

  78. #78
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    I realize we're a little off topic, but I think Schleys is a good alternative to SGC if you don't want to lay down that much dough. For just under $300 we got two days of coaching, lift tickets, and lunch. There were about 25 of us in the group and 4-5 instructors including Richie. The next two days we rode with some others that were in our clinic too. We bought a 3 day pass that was $150(I think) and if we stayed another day you can take your pass to one of the shops and they'd give you the 4th day free. 5 days of DH, 2 with pro coaching, 1 day of XC and we're under $550. The place we stayed was $250+/- each. In the end w/flights and gas, I think we kept it around $2,000. Ttyl, Fahn
    Hubbard Bike Club

  79. #79
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    I realize we're a little off topic, but I think Schleys is a good alternative to SGC if you don't want to lay down that much dough. For just under $300 we got two days of coaching, lift tickets, and lunch. There were about 25 of us in the group and 4-5 instructors including Richie. The next two days we rode with some others that were in our clinic too. We bought a 3 day pass that was $150(I think) and if we stayed another day you can take your pass to one of the shops and they'd give you the 4th day free. 5 days of DH, 2 with pro coaching, 1 day of XC and we're under $550. The place we stayed was $250+/- each. In the end w/flights and gas, I think we kept it around $2,000. Ttyl, Fahn
    Hubbard Bike Club

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    once again off topic ! but worth a mention for those that dont want to do the sgc,
    Welcome to Bear Back Biking. offer caterd challet plus coaching/guiding at very reasonable prices.

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    4 mths n 22 days left... just curious have any of you guys took the heli drop... how was it?? how is the weather there in July...

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by specialmint View Post
    4 mths n 22 days left... just curious have any of you guys took the heli drop... how was it??
    Amazing views, cool being dropped off at the top of a mountain on a glacier, kind of a lame trail though. Super fall line, rutted, riding the brakes the whole way.

    On the off day, you'd be better off getting a coach to guide you to the peak and doing an out of bounds ride off the backside, maybe down to creekside or something on some of the old classic whistler stuff outside of the park. That is, unless you've never been in a helicopter and want to see your bike dangle thousands of feet above the valley...
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

  83. #83
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    Great to read other people's reviews of SGC. Two of my friends and I are booked for the first adult week, July 22-29. We're all competent riders but pretty new to FR/DH so we're definitely hoping the instruction will help get us to the next level. We'll be posting our experiences on our blog at gravitidriven | Ride until you can't pedal anymore! for anyone who might be interested.

    It will be great to meet some of you there! Less than 2 months now....anyone else feeling the stoke?

  84. #84
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    Jealous ..

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    2 more weeks... think i will bring my running shoes... for a short run round the golf course in the mornings... so so stoked!!

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by specialmint View Post
    2 more weeks... think i will bring my running shoes... for a short run round the golf course in the mornings... so so stoked!!

    I'd save your energy...
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

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    Quote Originally Posted by specialmint View Post
    2 more weeks... think i will bring my running shoes... for a short run round the golf course in the mornings... so so stoked!!

    which one theres loads ha ha ha,,, have fun

  88. #88
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    Who thinks of golf when there is brown pow to be shredded?

    Counting down the days here - next Wednesday the 18th we leave for 3 days on the North Shore then Adult week one at SGC. EPIC!

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    Hahaha... In this little place I call home we have about 5 official mtb trails... Of late if u r caught riding in unauthorized trails u will be fine Usd180.... Means no riding no hiking.... Joke right!!! Ok will focus on shredding instead... Soo stoke lah!!! 😄

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    7 days, 21 hours, 52 minutes and 12 seconds until we leave for the Shore and SGC. Brownpow!!

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    Doing adult camp #2. Can't wait!

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    SGC Adult Camp

    I'm attending Week #2 of the adult camps this year; this will be my 3rd year.

    A couple of tips:
    * check out YouTube videos of trails and well-known features like GLC drops, Aline drop, Frieght Train box, Drop in clinic, etc. Make a "hit" list of things you'd like to try before the week is out and share it with your coaches. The easiest way to hit any of these things is to follow an expert's line and speed, and the coaches can hit it all

    * Wed afternoon-ish is the most dangerous time. Your super-confident and fatigued. Consider knocking off early and checking out the village, or the pump track

    * Check out the foam pit, even if you don't want to try it. There's usually a group of people there and some of them will be semi-pro or better. Take water - it is HOT!

    * if you hit the foam pit or air bag *
    The hardest part of the foam pit is the roll in. You'll be on a hardtail bike and the g's at the bottom of the ramp will want to buckle your legs and fold you back over the bike. Stay strong! if you survive the roll in the jump is easy. Getting out of the foam is another matter.
    The air bag jump is steep and you'll be motoring; it's going to try and plant you on the face of the jump so stay strong but not rigid in your chest, arms and knees.

    Tantalus lodge:
    * pretty easy going. Not fancy but having a full kitchen is nice if you don't want to eat out every night. The camp does dinner on the first and last night, I usually go out a couple of times and then cook a real dinner the other nights. There are grocery stores (and a liqour store) close by.

    *They have a pool & 2 hot tubs, plus bike cleaning station. Parking (like everywhere in Whistler) is expensive and internet access a rip-off (user you mobile data plan if possible). They have secure bike storage but are OK with you keeping your bike(s) in your room. My day generally ends with: (1) rid to the lodge, (2) clean bike, (3) put bike in room and lay pads out to dry on balcony, (4) grab bathing suit and drink and head for hot tub, (5) dinner, phone family, (6) pass out by 9pm

    * I like staying at Tantalus because the majority of campers stay there; it's fun to share a hot tub and beer after a wicked day of riding and recount your day.

    I'm dragging along a buddy who's new to mountain biking, has never been on a DH bike and is very nervous... but he's still going.


    If anyone has any questions about my experiences the past two years, let me know.

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    Also forgot to mention in my previous post (and didn't see it in the thread). SGC has a videographer filming through the week. He'll grab some groups (all levels) and go film some stuff. On the last night they'll show the finished movie which is pretty cool.
    On Thursday they bring in Sterling Lawerence to shoot photos. If you've never seen this guy's work it is absolutely amazing. They'll split the entire camp into groups based on what you want to do for the photo (usually something like: technical, high-speed cornering or jumping) then take you out and set up a shot. At the dinner on the last night you get a copy of the print to take home.

  94. #94
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    plyawn, thanks for the beta

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    OK, so just got back from SGC Adult week 1 and all I can say is that it was the most amazing biking experience of my entire life. Anyone who is considering this but is still on the fence - DO IT. It WILL make you a better rider. Seriously, this is one of the rare situations where you really need to believe the hype.

    I went to SGC hoping to become a better rider all around, but specifically to learn how to do jumps and drops. I had never even ridden a DH bike before but since I had ridden XC for years and considered myself to be pretty competent, I registered in the advanced category. My goal for the entire camp was to conquer my fear of air time and hit the GLC drop by the end of the week. It never crossed my mind that I might be setting the bar too low.

    Shandro runs a tight program. On day one, riders are grouped together based on the information they provide when they register. Watching some of the other riders, I was wondering if maybe I had made a mistake and gotten in over my head. Everyone is a little nervous the first morning, so your coach (we started out with Kyle Jamieson and he was awesome) takes you out to work on fundamentals like cornering, stance, and weight distribution until everyone calms down. Monday is a little nuts - people are jittery and amped up trying to show off their skills and there are lots of crashes. My advice to a first timer would be take it easy, focus on following your coach's instruction and don't worry about how you match up with the rest of the group. The coaches want you to get the most out of the camp and they will make sure you're in a group where you will learn what you need to know, so don't worry about it too much if you get reassigned - it will only benefit you in the end. Our group was pretty tight but Kyle watched us pretty closely to make sure we were evenly matched. We ended up losing 2 guys by lunch (one crashed out and another got sent down to an easier group) but picked up two more in the afternoon so our group size stayed at 4. The pace was pretty easy for the day as everyone got a feel for the group and Kyle had us start sessioning some jump lines and drops. This was the stuff that terrified me, but Kyle gave me some pointers that helped me feel a lot more confident in the air and by the end of the day I hit the middle GLC drop.

    Tuesday Kyle ramped it up a bit and started taking us into harder runs like Dirt Merchant and A-Line to practice jumping. For a guy like me who was terrified of jumps and drops, it was baptism by fire. We hit the rock drop on Dirt Merchant followed by the huge step up and the small creek gap. Kyle showed us the good lines and demonstrated anything we were unsure of. It was intimidating for me to start with, but Kyle's encouragement and instruction was super helpful and I made a decision to try it anyway and damn the consequences. Before I knew it I was gaining confidence like crazy and trying to charge hard at the same jumps that had freaked me out the day before. Coming down into the base just before lunch Kyle looked at me over his shoulder and asked if I wanted to go big. I nodded yes and he set the pace and guided me over the big GLC drop. My goal for the entire week was accomplished before noon on Day 2!

    On Wednesday the coaches shuffled the deck and my group ended up with Katrina Strand. Katrina is in insanely good shape and the lady can SHRED. She is also a really, REALLY good coach. She took us down Schleyer and worked with us on line choice and reading the terrain. The first time down she stopped us at all the technical spots and explained what to do while encouraging us to be creative and use our skills, then the second time we flowed it all the way through, applying what we had learned. For a guy like me who (prior to SGC) had never ridden off anything higher than 2 feet, it was a serious rush being able to clean that run from top to bottom and hit all the drops and step downs. Katrina took us up to Garbanzo in the afternoon and we rode Original Sin, No Joke, Drop In Clinic, and Too Tight, working on our technical skills. That night the rep from Fox put on a suspension clinic where we learned a lot more about how to dial in our bikes.

    At SGC they don't let you get complacent, and Thursday morning we found out we were riding with the boss man himself, Andrew Shandro. For me this was a huge privilege but also a lot of pressure. Shandro has been at the top of the game for years and you know that when you have a guy like him riding behind you, you had better bust a move. Riding with Shandro seemed less about learning and more about pushing, but by this point of the week it actually felt good to just ride as quickly and as much as possible and try to apply everything I had learned. Shandro was definitely there at all times to point out if we were doing anything wrong, but also to encourage us to keep trying new things. That afternoon he took us down Fade to Black, which was the first thing I had seen during the week that I wasn't sure I could ride without getting hurt. I rode around the big stuff, which was disappointing but probably smart considering I was getting pretty tired by that point.

    Friday was amazing. We burned in a couple of quick laps down A-Line before heading up - ALL the way up - to the top of the mountain. Whistler's Peak Chair would be worth going up even if you didn't have a bike, just for the amazing view and vertigo-inducing ride over steep snow fields and huge, rocky cliffs. Whistler only sells a limited number of these tickets per day in order to limit the number of people in the sensitive alpine environment, but Shandro had arranged for an extra special treat for us - a lap down the brand new, not even open to the public yet "Top of the World" trail. The only other people on the trail were media people doing Whistler's sneak peak preview - not even Shandro had ridden it yet. Riding in the high alpine was incredible, and we were so focused on the trail that we almost forgot to take in the view. Top of the World drops you back into the Garbanzo zone in the bike park, and we made our way down to Freight Train. Shandro knew that I was frustrated at not riding Fade to Black and had remembered my request for a way to work my way up to the challenge, so he took our group over to the infamous container jump. Following him in so I could get the correct speed, I made the step-up onto the containers easily but was so amped by that point that I totally overshot the drop on the other side, missing the wood ramp entirely but still sticking the landing without any trouble. I was completely flying by that point - only five days earlier I had considered a jump like that to be completely out of my ability level, but SGC was a complete game changer for me.

    Saturday was pretty low key - they pretty much just let you pick your own groups, grab a coach, and go ride. I had a couple friends who had been injured earlier in the week who I wanted to ride with, so we hooked up with SGC coach Steve Wilson and went to have some fun. The pace was definitely much slacker than the other days but we had a great time doing some filming with some guys from Lezyne (they're an SGC sponsor) and checking out some new trails, including the incredibly rowdy Goat's Gully. The day finished off with a farewell dinner when Shandro and the coaches handed out tons of door prizes - everyone got custom ODI grips, stickers, and JBL speakers, and some people got tires, goggles, floor pumps, and boxes of Clif bars. One lucky guy got a POC fullface helmet and another guy won a Fox 32 TALAS fork - and this is after we all got Dakine packs & t-shirts, Lezyne hand pumps, and goodies from Clif bar all week long. The schwag is definitely as advertised.

    Overall it was a great experience. The atmosphere is awesome and everyone is really cool and approachable. The coaches do take the time to watch you ride and will work with you individually to get you to the next level. SGC totally exceeded my expectations and I would recommend it to anyone. Don't be scared off if you're a novice rider. There were 2 novice groups there last week and my friend was in one of them, and they all showed tremendous improvement by the end of the week. My buddy has only been mountain biking for a year, and he capped off his camp by hitting the big GLC drop on Saturday. This is a guy who would previously walk down anything even remotely technical - SGC made that much of a difference!

    I know I'm sounding like a total fanboy here, but seriously it was an amazing week. I'm still coming down off the high and my biggest concern right now is finding time to stay on the bike so I don't lose everything I learned. If you're on the fence about going to SGC, DO IT. You won't regret it. I'll definitely be going back if I have anything to say about it.

  96. #96
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    Great review, sounds like a fun week.

    I probably saw you there, I was there 7/20-7/27.

    Congrats on the stuff you hit by the way - this trip was my first time there too & the runs you're describing are no joke.
    Check out my You Tube Channel

  97. #97
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    I am definitely signing up next year. My Whistler camp with a local coach fell through this year but I am still going to try to book with Ritchie Schley in September. Got to put that money aside for SGC next year.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamsbry View Post
    I am definitely signing up next year. My Whistler camp with a local coach fell through this year but I am still going to try to book with Ritchie Schley in September. Got to put that money aside for SGC next year.
    You won't regret it. Honestly it was the best thing I've ever done for my riding. It it seriously amazing how quickly you improve, and I know I'll definitely be going back. It ain't cheap but it's money well spent.

  99. #99
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    anybody going july28 - august 4th from the Seattle area??

  100. #100
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    I'm doing the July 28 - Aug 4 week, and I've been to Seattle. Does that count?

  101. #101
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    haha see you there man, is this your first time going or you've been before?? I just gotta get my new rig because I don't think my scapegoat 2010 would be enough for the bigger stuff. specialized demo 1 will do better I think

  102. #102
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    Of you've never been, the rental fleet is really nice. Ill be there the next week.

  103. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qmed036 View Post
    haha see you there man, is this your first time going or you've been before?? I just gotta get my new rig because I don't think my scapegoat 2010 would be enough for the bigger stuff. specialized demo 1 will do better I think
    First time there. I'm taking my Aurum, and all the armor I can possibly fit on my body - full gladiator.

  104. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkrobe View Post
    First time there. I'm taking my Aurum, and all the armor I can possibly fit on my body - full gladiator.
    Nice. I gotta get some body armor myself. are you staying at provided hotel?? or somewhere else?

  105. #105
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    Man you guys are lucky ! ENjoy it

  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qmed036 View Post
    Nice. I gotta get some body armor myself. are you staying at provided hotel?? or somewhere else?
    I'm staying in the provided hotel, sharing with a buddy and buddy's buddy. Seems cheap, and I have earplugs.

  107. #107
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    sounds good. I'll see you there

  108. #108
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    Staying at the Tantalizer (the SGC hotel) is a blast. It's not the nicest hotel but its great hanging out with the other campers at the end of the day and sharing war stories.

    We'll be heading back this year as well, but we're doing week 2 (Aug 4-10) so we'll miss you. If anyone else is heading out for week 2, let me know and maybe we can link up for a few laps. You guys are going to have a great time.

  109. #109
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    anybody here going to ADULT SGC 2014?

  110. #110
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    Hmm. Want to go badly this year, not sure if I can fit it in yet. Will probably just try to make several weekend trips up this year.

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    i really wanted to go. only hesitation is i don't know anybody else that is going. will i be out of place? and i new to DH/FR. only been riding for 2 yrs so i am not good at all. and by the way i am 34.

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamsbry View Post
    Hmm. Want to go badly this year, not sure if I can fit it in yet. Will probably just try to make several weekend trips up this year.
    kamsbry i wish i could do just that. i am at a disadvantage geographically.

  113. #113
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    I'm heading there again this year, and I'm taking my wife. It was a blast last year, and I learned a tonne. It doesn't matter if you're an ex-pro or have never been on a bike before, you will learn something new. The oldest camper in our week was a 62 year old grandma who had never mtn biked before. Most of us were in our 30s and 40s, and from all over: US, NZ, Oz, Spain, Singapore, Austria, Mexico, SA, etc. Lots of single riders, but everybody makes friends by the end of the first day. The coaches were all pretty good, although I heard that anyone in Shandro's group needed to clean out their shorts every couple of laps. Worth every penny, and then some.

  114. #114
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    that is very convincing. might as well go. are you on the first or 2nd camp?

  115. #115
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    First camp. I can't imagine trying to pick through the crowds during Crankworx.

  116. #116
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    I'm heading back to SGC this year as well, with a few buddies. Should be 3 or 4 of us going for Adult week 2. We did week 2 last year too and it definitely gets busier towards the end of the week with Crankworx starting, but it's only for the last day or so and with the SGC lift line priority we really didn't notice it at all. Plus it was pretty rad watching Kirt Voreis, who had been our coach earlier in the week, compete in the Speed & Style Dual race on Saturday. No idea what the coach lineup looks like for this year yet, but last year's was top shelf. Got Kirt Voreis for 2 days, Kyle Jameson for 2 days, Thomas Vanderham for a day, and Shandro for the last day. Shandro definitely likes to push you and see you apply what you've learned, but it's awesome. I guess we were supposed to have Wade Simmons as well but he had to back out because his wife was having a baby. Sucks we missed him but congrats to them and hopefully we'll get him this year. Regardless of which week you pick, you will learn a tonne and you will come away from it a better rider. Don't worry if you're just starting out. My first day of SGC in 2012 was the first time I had ever sat on a DH bike.

  117. #117
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    i am going to my first SGC this year i can't wait.

  118. #118
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    Woot! Let the good times roll! I keep hinting at Silver Star to do a big kid's week, and I'll be heading out there too if they put it on.

  119. #119
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    I will be going to week 1 this year for my first time. Just got a new DH bike... cant wait.

  120. #120
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    SGC was not just a game changer, it was a life changer. My first time on a DH bike was at SGC 2012 (with Parabellum -- a few replies up) we made tons of friends and now use it as our "man-cation" to reunite with friends from all over. As far as skills increasing... I am racing the BC cup series this season and a couple of regional races... last years camp I was watching guys compete in Crankworx...this year I am competing in it. I turn 46 in April. Don't wait to dream your dream.
    Last edited by VanGor44; 02-15-2014 at 09:37 AM. Reason: Typo

  121. #121
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    I'm primarily a trail/AM rider but doing this camp to get into downhill. I'm going for my first SGC this summer, week 2. I have never been on a DH bike before or too a bike park for that matter. Just wondering if anybody had some first time advice.

    Also, I'm going by myself so definitely looking to meet some fellow riders. Let me know!

  122. #122
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    First time advice...hmmmm. Probably a few things to think about:

    Be honest which category of rider you are. They use the ratings to put together riders of similar skill so the groups will be pretty close in ability and will be able to learn together and push each other. The first year we went to SGC there were a couple guys who just wanted to ride with certain coaches so they followed groups that were over their heads instead of going where they were assigned. The coaches would strongly suggest that they drop down a level and ride with a group that was more their speed, but they would keep coming back because the coach of the "lower" group was maybe someone less famous and they wanted to ride with the rock star coach instead. That's total BS - ALL of the coaches at SGC have forgotten more about mountain biking than I'll ever know in my lifetime, and unless you're winning the FMB tour or the World Cup title every year you can learn something from any one of them. On the other side of the coin, last year we had an Australian kid in our group who was riding at a semi-pro level and smoked us all, but he wanted to stay with us because our group had a great vibe. Either way, you will probably get the most out of the camp if you ride with a group you're fitted to because the instruction will be aimed at the things you need to improve. Let the coaches do their jobs.

    Don't be afraid to try new things. Some of the instruction you will get might seem weird or counterintuitive, but try it anyway. Last year Kirt Voreis taught us about countersteering into turns and made us spend the entire morning doing turning drills around rocks. At the time it seemed like the most ridiculous thing ever, but when I tried it on the trail it was amazing the difference it made. Have confidence in your own abilities too, and use the instruction you get to push your limits. The instructors are pretty savvy - they'll quickly get a pretty good idea of what you are capable of riding so even if they suggest something you normally wouldn't think about trying, you might want to give it a shot. They certainly don't want to get anyone hurt, so if they tell you they think you can do something, you probably can. When Vangor and I went to SGC in 2012 it was the first time we had ever sat on DH bikes, and since then (with the help of the coaches) we have ridden stuff like Filthy Ape, Dwayne Johnson, and Fade to Black. You will surprise yourself.

    Listen to your body. Six straight days of non-stop riding is pretty demanding physically. By Wednesday you will likely be dog tired and your hands will be hamburger. Don't be afraid to sit out for a run or two if you need a rest - if you ride when you're exhausted you WILL pay the consequences. The coaches are usually pretty aware of this and will dial the pace back if they see the group is fading, but by mid-week you will be brimming with confidence from all the stuff you've learned and may not be fully aware of how tired you actually are. There is no shame in quitting early or dropping down to spin some laps with a less aggressive group if you're not feeling up for whatever your crew is riding - it's better to bring it down a notch, recover a bit, and join up with your group again the next day when you're feeling fresh. Be mindful of your energy level, and don't put yourself in danger.

    Have fun! SGC can be intimidating, especially for a first timer. That first morning when you show up and get grouped with a bunch of new people and you're staring at guys like Chris Kovarik and Thomas Vanderham and realize they're going to be your coaches, you will probably start to wonder what you have gotten yourself into. Relax. You don't need to impress anyone, just focus on what the coaches are teaching you and ride for yourself. 90% of the people are super laid back and you will make some awesome new friends. Enjoy the experience!

    Look us up if you feel like it. We're in the Advanced group - I'll be the guy on the white Knolly Podium and Vangor will be the cloud of dust halfway down the hill before the rest of us are even off the chair. See you out there!

  123. #123
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    First time advice:
    Don't overestimate your ability. If you've been riding for a while and can ride down everything you normally encounter on regular trails, intermediate should work. If that's wrong, they will move you to a different group. I moved groups 4 times in 4 days. Just go with it.
    Listen to your coaches, they are really good.
    Take some time to dial in your suspension in the first couple of days.
    Do the Top of the World ride on the last day, but skip the extended bit down to Creekside and take the option to head back into the resort.
    Get hammered with your coaches on the last night after dinner.
    Eat at the Furniture Warehouse [assuming it's still there].
    Put your pads in the sun to dry, let the UV kill the stench.
    Don't be concerned if you have no idea who your coaches are.
    If you want to work on a specific aspect of your riding, ASK! If you're bad at drops or chunder or steeps or whatever, you can ask the coaches for pointers starting on Day 2 [day 1 is evaluation].
    Relax, have fun, don't get drunk at lunch.

  124. #124
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    Really appreciate the advice guys! I was thinking about putting myself as intermediate since I feel like I can comfortably handle steep rocky sections of my local trails (Northern New Jersey), but I ultimately went on the safe side and put novice. I've never been on a DH bike so I imagine the geometry is slightly different, but I've been riding mountain bikes and dirtbikes for awhile so maybe I'll be more comfortable than I think. Either way, just trying to play it safe to start. I figured that if they watch me day 1 and I'm better than I think than I'll move to intermediate. I'll trust the coaches.

    Another question, gear/protection? Right now, I'm thinking obviously full face helmet, elbow pads, knee pads, and some padded shorts. I also have the 5.10 freerider shoes. I mean, is that good enough? Do I really need a fully padded flak jacket and neck brace right off the bat?

    Finally, the rentals. I did the performance bike rental package (hey, when in rome right?). How are the bikes?

    Thanks for the advice guys! Really helpful.

  125. #125
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    I wear a pack while riding, so I ditched the spine protector. I did eat it on A-line, so I was glad to have shoulder pads. I own a neck brace, but didn't wear it at the camp. The premium rental looks like a Session. . I'm not sure what they'll have this year, but the rental fleet will be in place by mid-May.

  126. #126
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    Protection runs the gamut - you'll see everything from full stormtrooper suits to the park rats wearing wifebeaters and board shorts. I usually wear knee pads and a neck brace, and I'll wear arm guards if I know we're going to be doing something gnarly and I think there's a good chance I'll crash. Definitely wear a full-face, but other than that you should wear whatever level of protection makes you feel comfortable and confident. I wore a pack the first year, then went without it last year - vastly prefer riding without. While you're in the park you're never far from help anyway. I did take a pack when we did Top Of The World and I recommend you do too - you'll be out there for a while so you'll want snacks/water and it's a looooong walk back if you have a mechanical and can't fix it. I know someone in an earlier post said to skip the extended run down to Creekside and come back through the park instead, but I'd recommend the opposite. There are some amazing trails in the Khyber Pass area and last year a couple groups even got to do Ride Don't Slide. If you're up for the challenge, don't miss out on the opportunity - it's what you're there for! The grunt back to the village is a little rough though. Pounding pavement on a 40lb DH bike sucks.

    As far as the premium rental goes - you'll be getting a decent bike. Last year a lot of them were carbon Sessions. Even the "default" rental is a Giant Glory, so it's not like you'll be getting some ghetto lead sled from 2002. It's nice machinery.

  127. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpmoore View Post
    Really appreciate the advice guys! I was thinking about putting myself as intermediate since I feel like I can comfortably handle steep rocky sections of my local trails (Northern New Jersey), but I ultimately went on the safe side and put novice. I've never been on a DH bike so I imagine the geometry is slightly different, but I've been riding mountain bikes and dirtbikes for awhile so maybe I'll be more comfortable than I think. Either way, just trying to play it safe to start. I figured that if they watch me day 1 and I'm better than I think than I'll move to intermediate. I'll trust the coaches.

    Another question, gear/protection? Right now, I'm thinking obviously full face helmet, elbow pads, knee pads, and some padded shorts. I also have the 5.10 freerider shoes. I mean, is that good enough? Do I really need a fully padded flak jacket and neck brace right off the bat?

    Finally, the rentals. I did the performance bike rental package (hey, when in rome right?). How are the bikes?

    Thanks for the advice guys! Really helpful.
    I see you mentioned you are in NNJ as i am too. You should hit up Mountain Creek and do some sessions, so you can get a feel of what DH is about. There is a huge difference between riding trails in Ringwood and DH trails , the bikes geo is different.

    For protection grab what you can, i usually ride with just knee pads and my full face helmet only but i know it holds me back sometimes on some sketchy things, i tend to ride less cautious when suited up. I would skip the neck brace unless you plan on hitting some of the big jumps and drops. A fully padded jacket i would recommend if you know you guys will be riding some serious rock gardens and steep off camber trails.

    I plan on hitting up Mtn Creek , its been a while since i been back on a DH bike after my crash i had that messed me up. So if you wanna hit some trails at a tame pace, lemme know.

  128. #128
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    Go with the protection you feel most comfortable with. I ride with kneepads 90% of the time so that is just standard for me. For Whistler I generally use armor top like the Troy Lee, Poc or Leatt 3df (just ordered a new one). Soft armor is so much more comfortable than the hard plastic stuff. It's only going to be my 3rd season riding the park so I occasionally go down and having full protection up top has really helped. Full face helmets are your best friend, I just got a new one after cracking my Fox at a DH race a few weeks ago.

    Agree on the pack-less riding. I just keep a credit card, ID and cash in my DH shorts and leave the pack in the room or a locker at the base.

  129. #129
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    Jpmoore- I sent you a private message

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    Question for y'all that ride without packs - do you carry anything with you to fix your bike? What happens if you get a flat at the top of the hill?

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    Last year, I bought an "Amphipod" fannypack and stuffed it with all of my tools, tube, CO2, ID, etc and it was great. Didn't have to take it off for lifts, etc. It's become my "go-to" for my DH rides now. It's super low profile and I really doubt anyone even knew I was wearing it.

    Amphipod Airflow Endurance Waistpack at REI.com

  132. #132
    MattSavage
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbell View Post
    Last year, I bought an "Amphipod" fannypack and stuffed it with all of my tools, tube, CO2, ID, etc and it was great. Didn't have to take it off for lifts, etc. It's become my "go-to" for my DH rides now. It's super low profile and I really doubt anyone even knew I was wearing it.

    Amphipod Airflow Endurance Waistpack at REI.com

    I can't believe Shandro let you in with that...!

    jk...
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

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  133. #133
    jpmoore
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    Thanks for all the responses and advice. I actually went out and got elbow pads, knee pads, and a full face helmet. Elbows, I got the Dainese trail skins. They are just enough protection, not overly expensive, and low profile enough to fit under sleeves. Granted, I'll probably hardly ever wear them on the trail or when I do an enduro race, but to start out DH I figured I'm better safe than sorry. Pack or no pack; I figure I'll start out day 1 with the pack and if I find I don't need it just leave it in the room the rest of the days. I've never not ridden without a hydration pack so I'm pretty used to it at this point.

    Those rentals sound awesome! I'm just overall pumped to get there and just start learning and riding. Is it August 2nd yet???

    AEDUBBER, where in NJ are you from? I'll let you know when I'm planning to head to MCBP. I normally ride Blue Mountain in Peekskill, NY as I don't have a dedicated DH bike, but I'm planning to upgrade the suspension soon on my SB66 so I'll let you know.

  134. #134
    RideDirt
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpmoore View Post
    Thanks for all the responses and advice. I actually went out and got elbow pads, knee pads, and a full face helmet. Elbows, I got the Dainese trail skins. They are just enough protection, not overly expensive, and low profile enough to fit under sleeves. Granted, I'll probably hardly ever wear them on the trail or when I do an enduro race, but to start out DH I figured I'm better safe than sorry. Pack or no pack; I figure I'll start out day 1 with the pack and if I find I don't need it just leave it in the room the rest of the days. I've never not ridden without a hydration pack so I'm pretty used to it at this point.

    Those rentals sound awesome! I'm just overall pumped to get there and just start learning and riding. Is it August 2nd yet???

    AEDUBBER, where in NJ are you from? I'll let you know when I'm planning to head to MCBP. I normally ride Blue Mountain in Peekskill, NY as I don't have a dedicated DH bike, but I'm planning to upgrade the suspension soon on my SB66 so I'll let you know.
    I'm up north by Wayne/ Ringwood area. Mountain Creek is like 30 minutes from me. Well I don't have a bike since I sold my Demo 8 last year so I will have to rent up at Creek, they have a new fleet of Demo 8 bikes ; ) . I can give you a tour of the place or if I run into a couple buddies we can ride with some pro riders.

  135. #135
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    If you're in the camps someone should be able to help you with a mechanical. If you're on your own near the top of fitz you can catch the gondola down, lower down you can walk down the road if you can get to it, not too far. Or offer a stranger for a tube lol, I've given people a tube and they gave me a new tube and 6 pack at the bottom

  136. #136
    MattSavage
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevin267 View Post
    If you're in the camps someone should be able to help you with a mechanical. If you're on your own near the top of fitz you can catch the gondola down, lower down you can walk down the road if you can get to it, not too far. Or offer a stranger for a tube lol, I've given people a tube and they gave me a new tube and 6 pack at the bottom
    Don't expect the coaches to help you. That's not their roll, they're not a sag wagon. Every minute they waste on you is a minute less of riding and coaching that the others aren't getting, yet paid for. You should be self supported and able to maintain your own equipment.
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

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  137. #137
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    Signed up for the first adult camp. Started riding in to work 2-3 days a week 26km each way. Finally got my dh sorted and rode half Nelson 2 weeks ago and fit in a CBC to pangor lap on Saturday. Gonna run some bobsled laps this week and hope to get up to whistler soon. Need to make sure I'm ready for that many whistler days in a row. Hope to fit in some runs to the new gravity park as we'll. Should be a great summer of biking.

    Don't know that I'd describe myself as advanced but I seem to fit the sgc description of it. Comfortable on north shore trails. Can wheelie into the sunset but can't manual for **** (go figure) Ride whistler a couple times per year. Love a-line, freight train etc. mostly comfortable in the air, though it's probably the thing I want to work on the most at the camp.

  138. #138
    Donkey Puncher
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    Arai... you'll be fine in that category....to anyone else curious about their category and how well they will fit...don't worry about it! At ANY time you can move up or down to any skill level group that suits you best. Some guys with wicked skills sometimes need to do a run or two in a lower skilled group just to get their confidence where it needs to be and shake off the "whistler SGC bug" (Nervousness for being at whistler for the first time or being in an unknown group environment) At the end of it all, you'll leave a waaaay better rider, and have a ton more new friends.

  139. #139
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    Jealous. Heading up tomorrow afternoon to ride for the weekend but would really like to do the camp. Don't think it is the budget this year however.

  140. #140
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    Made it up to whistler today. Beautiful 26 degree weather. Haha will be interesting how I'll survive 6 days at the park.

    I consider myself in shape, gym 3 times a week, ride 50km on the road bike 3 times a week. But a full day ripping whistler in 26 degrees is tiring. I'm going to be in bed by 8pm. I'm sure you just get used to it after a couple days.

  141. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by arai View Post
    But a full day ripping whistler in 26 degrees is tiring. I'm going to be in bed by 8pm. I'm sure you just get used to it after a couple days.
    If you spend a day at Whistler, and you're NOT tired, there is something wrong with you. That's for sure.

  142. #142
    MattSavage
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    Quote Originally Posted by arai View Post
    Made it up to whistler today. Beautiful 26 degree weather. Haha will be interesting how I'll survive 6 days at the park.

    I consider myself in shape, gym 3 times a week, ride 50km on the road bike 3 times a week. But a full day ripping whistler in 26 degrees is tiring. I'm going to be in bed by 8pm. I'm sure you just get used to it after a couple days.
    Unless your workouts involve 30 minute wall sits and dangling from a pull up bar for hours, then there's not a whole lot you can do to prepare for the abuse the bike park puts on your body. If you don't have massive blood blisters on your hands after the first day, then you're doing it wrong...
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

  143. #143
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    anybody here doing August 1-8 SGC adult 2015? i am very excited to go.

    Based on what i read from here, i will be bringing my own bike and gear.

    It would be nice to at least know somebody who is also going. It will be my first time going to Canada and i am going solo.

    I am a US permanent resident, not a citizen. I know i only needed my green card and passport to enter Canada but if anybody here who was in the same situation, I would like to hear/know your experience and far as boring crossing goes.

  144. #144
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    I did that in 2009 as a resident also, driving from Las Vegas, depending on where are you from, (some countries don't need visa to enter Canada, some do) you should not have a problem, get ready to have the time of your life on a bike!!
    Quote Originally Posted by tagabalay View Post
    anybody here doing August 1-8 SGC adult 2015? i am very excited to go.

    Based on what i read from here, i will be bringing my own bike and gear.

    It would be nice to at least know somebody who is also going. It will be my first time going to Canada and i am going solo.

    I am a US permanent resident, not a citizen. I know i only needed my green card and passport to enter Canada but if anybody here who was in the same situation, I would like to hear/know your experience and far as boring crossing goes.

  145. #145
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    lokomonkey thanks.

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