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Thread: Softer

  1. #1
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Softer

    I already posted about making my fork/rear shock more plush/soft and i have my shock perfect, but in rock gardens or over series of bumps, or rocks my fork feels like it doesent compress at all, and i wanted to make it softer there. it feels like it goes down twice as much when i pedal as when i go off a drop or jump. there are two knobs on the bottom of the fork and these are their explinations

    Rebound adjustment by external adjuster - Right leg

    By turning the adjuster clockwise, you increase the hydraulic damping making the fork slower during the rebound phase.
    By turning the adjuster counter-clockwise you reduse the hydraulic damping making the fork more reactive during the rebound phase.

    Compression adjustment by external adjuster - Left leg

    By turning the adjuster clockwise, you increase the hydraulic damping during the compression phase.
    By turning the adjuster counter-clockwise, you resuse the hydraulic damping dueing the compression phase.

    here are some pics of the adjusting knobs and how far they were turned when i got the bike and where ive been riding them at. and also the one on the left leg wont turn at all . im just really confused right now. here are the pics.

    Right leg- turned all the way that the arrow is pointing:



    Left leg- knob wont turn at all


    If anyone could help me it would be much appreciated
    Last edited by Kona DH; 07-18-2007 at 12:20 AM.

  2. #2
    Bottlerockin'
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    wowzers

  3. #3
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    yeah- i need help

  4. #4
    Bottlerockin'
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    looks like you like where the low speed compression is--nice and plush--but youd like your high speed compression more forgiving...
    hmm...what fork do you have/is there separate high/low speed compression knobs?

  5. #5
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    a super t, its on my 2006 iron horse yakuza kumicho

    and i want it to absorb all the little rocks and bumps- and also feel nice and soft on jumps and drops. right now it feels like it goes in more when i pedal then when im riding

  6. #6
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    take a zip tie and put it on your fork's santion and go find a small drop to flat like 4 stairs or something now drop the stairs and see how much the zip tie moved, mess with the adjustments until it goes down as much as u want.... thats wat i do

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ich_dh
    take a zip tie and put it on your fork's santion and go find a small drop to flat like 4 stairs or something now drop the stairs and see how much the zip tie moved, mess with the adjustments until it goes down as much as u want.... thats wat i do

    well i also need it to be softer over rocks and bumps, and i need to know what to turn to make it softer

  8. #8
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    bump

  9. #9
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    I think Super-T's spike (almost go rigid) w/ to many hits in a row (ie, a rock garden) like the Jr. T's did. Not sure if that's the case but it could be your problem. If so, that's the nature of the fork and low end dampening, in other words, you may be S.O.L.
    I could be wrong though. Or your rebound could be to fast.
    Do you know what those adjustment descriptions mean?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnaR9
    I think Super-T's spike (almost go rigid) w/ to many hits in a row (ie, a rock garden) like the Jr. T's did. Not sure if that's the case but it could be your problem. If so, that's the nature of the fork and low end dampening, in other words, you may be S.O.L.
    I could be wrong though. Or your rebound could be to fast.
    Do you know what those adjustment descriptions mean?
    i kinda know what they mean. here are some pics of the adjusting knobs and how far they were turned when i got the bike and where ive been riding them at. and also the one on the left leg wont turn at all . im just really confused right now. here are the pics.

    Right leg- turned all the way that the arrow is pointing:



    Left leg- knob wont turn at all

  11. #11
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    please, anyone i need help

  12. #12
    keystone addict
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    it sounds to me like you need a softer spring with more compression dampening. Take it to a shop and have them help you out. they will be a lot more helpful because they'll really be able to feel what you've got now (which is probably waaaaaay messed up, considering one of the knobs is bottomed out and the other wont even move).
    I kinda wish my brakes actually worked, but I guess that just makes me faster, right?

  13. #13
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    This really does not have to do with your fork but when you are pedaling on a Dh course you should keep your body CG as close to the rear shock that you can, preventing compression on your fork. This allows for more efficent pedaling and less bobbing. This is where over all body training comes into play, having a very strong core body and strong upper helps a lot. Lol I could be totally off but it works very well for me when I race.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jettj45
    This really does not have to do with your fork but when you are pedaling on a Dh course you should keep your body CG as close to the rear shock that you can, preventing compression on your fork. This allows for more efficent pedaling and less bobbing. This is where over all body training comes into play, having a very strong core body and strong upper helps a lot. Lol I could be totally off but it works very well for me when I race.
    If what you post has absolutely nothing to do w/ his fork spiking, why post it...
    Edit - UNFORGIVABLE!

  15. #15
    No longer riding a haro!
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    I agree with Fred on this one. The reason your fork feels like crap in rock gardens is not because it's improperly adjusted, its mainly because its got the crap dampening. My friend's junior t (same dampening as new super t's) would become virtually locked up at the end of rock gardens.
    If you're not living on the edge you're taking up to much space.

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