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  1. #1
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    single crown vs dual crown

    can someone explain the difference and benefits, pros/cons of the two besides one is single and the other is dual?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEWBIErider
    can someone explain the difference and benefits, pros/cons of the two besides one is single and the other is dual?
    dual crown is crowns on each side of the head tube....usually stiffer

    single crown is below the head tube only....allows you to do bar spins
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    dual crown is crowns on each side of the head tube....usually stiffer

    single crown is below the head tube only....allows you to do bar spins

    so a DC is just more stiff than a SC? thats it? is one better than the other. im sure if your doing like 10-15 foot drops you wanna run a DC. so with a SC fork you cant be as aggerssive?

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    Quote Originally Posted by NEWBIErider
    so a DC is just more stiff than a SC? thats it? is one better than the other. im sure if your doing like 10-15 foot drops you wanna run a DC. so with a SC fork you cant be as aggerssive?

    pros do some huge hucks on single crowns.....that is mostly why they went to the bigger headtube (1.5)
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEWBIErider
    so a DC is just more stiff than a SC? thats it? is one better than the other. im sure if your doing like 10-15 foot drops you wanna run a DC. so with a SC fork you cant be as aggerssive?
    I hucked huge on my totem. worked fine (blew it up... but that has nothing to do with the SC vs DC question). My Totem was stiffer then it's preceding Travis triple.

    The dual crown usually allows for a shorter overall axle to crown, for the same travel. lets us the boxxer / totem for example.

    I think the boxxer is only like 1/2in longer then the totem, but has a full inch greater travel.

    in a DC you have more space for longer cartridges, but that isn't a bid plus or minus. if any at all.

    I like the DC cuz it inspires confidence, but like the SC cuz you can x-up.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEWBIErider
    so a DC is just more stiff than a SC? thats it? is one better than the other. im sure if your doing like 10-15 foot drops you wanna run a DC. so with a SC fork you cant be as aggerssive?
    DC's are usually meant for DH, so they're meant to handle consecutive bumps in a short time period without "packing up," or being fully compressed after these multiple consecutive hits. So, the longest travel DCs have a bit more travel than the longest travel SCs, so they can go farther without packing up. They are also more plush, so they respond to multiple, yet relatively small bumps better than a FR SC fork.

    Examples: Rockshox Boxxer, Marz 888, Fox 40

    A long travel SC fork is usually meant for FR, so it is meant to handle stunts of off large drops. It will allow barspins, as SMT said. It will normally be less apt than a DC to handle multiple consecutive hits without packing up. However, it will be able to handle larger drops because it is not as plush as a DC. An SC will normally be not quite as stiff as a DC (though 1.5 steerers are helping with this), but since you need the maneuverability of a SC fork for freeride, a compromisse must be made (if you could do barspins with a DC, they'd use that as a FR fork).

    Examples: Rockshox Totem, Marz 66, Fox 36 Van

    However, the largest drops are still done with DCs (if you watch freeride videos where the object is the longest drop, you'll see), due to the fact that SCs still aren't quite stiff enough for these crazy people.

    Tim
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  7. #7
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    single crown is lighter weight

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuksul08
    single crown is lighter weight
    not always
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tibug
    DC's are usually meant for DH, so they're meant to handle consecutive bumps in a short time period without "packing up," or being fully compressed after these multiple consecutive hits. So, the longest travel DCs have a bit more travel than the longest travel SCs, so they can go farther without packing up. They are also more plush, so they respond to multiple, yet relatively small bumps better than a FR SC fork.

    Examples: Rockshox Boxxer, Marz 888, Fox 40

    A long travel SC fork is usually meant for FR, so it is meant to handle stunts of off large drops. It will allow barspins, as SMT said. It will normally be less apt than a DC to handle multiple consecutive hits without packing up. However, it will be able to handle larger drops because it is not as plush as a DC. An SC will normally be not quite as stiff as a DC (though 1.5 steerers are helping with this), but since you need the maneuverability of a SC fork for freeride, a compromisse must be made (if you could do barspins with a DC, they'd use that as a FR fork).

    Examples: Rockshox Totem, Marz 66, Fox 36 Van

    However, the largest drops are still done with DCs (if you watch freeride videos where the object is the longest drop, you'll see), due to the fact that SCs still aren't quite stiff enough for these crazy people.

    Tim

    this is the info i was really after. thanks again Tim.

    Ricky

  10. #10
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    not always

    Yeah, I've got a 7 lb DJ2 on my hardtail. That thing weighs more than most DC foks out now and it only has 4" travel. I really need to replace that anchor...

  11. #11
    StraightOuttaCompton
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    it is just really on preference and feel, and how you like your fork to perform
    HARDTAIL PRIDE- 09 Kona Five-0

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tibug
    DC's are usually meant for DH, so they're meant to handle consecutive bumps in a short time period without "packing up," or being fully compressed after these multiple consecutive hits. So, the longest travel DCs have a bit more travel than the longest travel SCs, so they can go farther without packing up. They are also more plush, so they respond to multiple, yet relatively small bumps better than a FR SC fork.

    Examples: Rockshox Boxxer, Marz 888, Fox 40

    A long travel SC fork is usually meant for FR, so it is meant to handle stunts of off large drops. It will allow barspins, as SMT said. It will normally be less apt than a DC to handle multiple consecutive hits without packing up. However, it will be able to handle larger drops because it is not as plush as a DC. An SC will normally be not quite as stiff as a DC (though 1.5 steerers are helping with this), but since you need the maneuverability of a SC fork for freeride, a compromisse must be made (if you could do barspins with a DC, they'd use that as a FR fork).

    Examples: Rockshox Totem, Marz 66, Fox 36 Van

    However, the largest drops are still done with DCs (if you watch freeride videos where the object is the longest drop, you'll see), due to the fact that SCs still aren't quite stiff enough for these crazy people.

    Tim
    HOWEVER, is it not possible to set up an SC super plush and a DC more stiff? thus allowing the SC to be as good for DH? Other than the strength and ridgity of a DC, i believe that any fork can only perform as well as the owner sets it up to (not to say that ANY fork can be set up for ANY application. the owner must use some level of common sense)

  13. #13
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    Well tuning (or especially improper tuning) can definitely change the rules from tibug's post, sure.

    I know especially with DH racing the stiffness really comes into play in fast, hard turns as wheel placement precision. A sloppy fork will actually be deflected by the forces on the wheel and thus give a very sloppy feeling front end. It makes it more difficult to stick a line and gives a very poor riding experience.

    This is in the extreme case. To the untrained rider, most modern day FR single crown forks like the 66, Fox 36 and Totem will feel indistinguishable from the stiffest dual crown fork. I personally am happy riding a Marz 66, and that's after riding a dual crown fork for the past few years. Your mileage will vary, as always in this sport.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker0755
    HOWEVER, is it not possible to set up an SC super plush and a DC more stiff? thus allowing the SC to be as good for DH? Other than the strength and ridgity of a DC, i believe that any fork can only perform as well as the owner sets it up to (not to say that ANY fork can be set up for ANY application. the owner must use some level of common sense)
    Correct. Except that forks intended for one application with most likely do best in that application.

    Tim
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker0755
    HOWEVER, is it not possible to set up an SC super plush and a DC more stiff? thus allowing the SC to be as good for DH? Other than the strength and ridgity of a DC, i believe that any fork can only perform as well as the owner sets it up to (not to say that ANY fork can be set up for ANY application. the owner must use some level of common sense)
    Correct. Except that forks intended for one application will most likely do best in that application.

    Tim
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

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