Shimano SAINT Wheels!!!- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Shimano SAINT Wheels!!!

    Unless I am seeing things. On the new cover of MBA looks like a set of Shimano Saint wheels on that Kona. I have the Shimano XT All mountain 20mm wheels on my Tracer Vpp and my NomadMKII. Best All mountain wheel set, I have ever owned. I am sure the SAINT Wheel set will be right up there with Mavic Deemax.
    2011 Santa Cruz TallBoy carbon & 2013 TallBoy LT carbon - S/C All the Time !!!

  2. #2
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    I can't see shimano ever building a wheelset under 5 lbs for heavy use, but I can see them selling overly-weighty crap for the same price of a higher quality part from another mfg!

  3. #3
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    as soon as shimano get's rid of loose-ball hubs i will buy it... until then, sealed stuff for me. And i'm a mechanic.. i love to work on my bike... but it does get old when, on any given day, I adjust and overhaul at least 3 customer's shimano hubs.... ugh....
    Proud to represent Mojo Wheels.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by chooofoojoo
    as soon as shimano get's rid of loose-ball hubs i will buy it... until then, sealed stuff for me. And i'm a mechanic.. i love to work on my bike... but it does get old when, on any given day, I adjust and overhaul at least 3 customer's shimano hubs.... ugh....
    Good, then as a mechanic you should know that there's no such thing as a truely "sealed" hub, and the shimano hubs have seals. Cartridge bearings don't take lateral loads at all, whereas the shimano "loose-ball" system has a lot more going on in it then you might think (I was a mechanic too, and I spent plenty of time fixing/rebuilding hubs. Some where shimano, some where not).
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  5. #5
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    I rode a rear XT QR hub on my Demo 8 for 2 years, never touched it. Just one person's experience, granted, but they seem to work OK...

  6. #6
    should know better.....
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    Of course shimano's are going to get rebuilt regularly, How many are in circulation, and what percentage of the population has even the slightest clue how to maintain a hub?

    The good part about loose ball hubs is you can fix them just about anywhere there is a bike shop.

  7. #7
    Meh.
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    I think the Saint rims are just DT rims with Saint stickers.

    There are benefits to using loose balls. For instance, the angular contact bearings are better with side loads than cartridge bearings. But sometimes it's a real pain to repack them. And you're SOL when you pit the inner race. But on the other hand, a shop is more likely to have all the common sizes of ball bearings as opposed to stocking a bunch of different sizes of cartridge bearings.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ojai Bicyclist
    I rode a rear XT QR hub on my Demo 8 for 2 years, never touched it. Just one person's experience, granted, but they seem to work OK...
    I blew up 4 or 5 of them. Bent axle on one, the rest were trashed freehubs. The front rocked out for years with no maintenance tho

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Good, then as a mechanic you should know that there's no such thing as a truely "sealed" hub, and the shimano hubs have seals. Cartridge bearings don't take lateral loads at all, whereas the shimano "loose-ball" system has a lot more going on in it then you might think (I was a mechanic too, and I spent plenty of time fixing/rebuilding hubs. Some where shimano, some where not).

    i understand the many different seal options shimano has on their various hubs. I also have ran almost every hub they have, and undoubtedly had problems with most of them. Broken axles, pitted races, cracked bearings, etc etc. Not that cartridge hubs don't have problems, however you take an adjustable tension cartridge hub, vs a loose-ball hub, the cartridge will win.

    Region also has a lot to do with hub longevity, and the dry dusty Rockies of colorado seem to be utterly brutal on shimano hubs. as does the uber wet. if you have a temperate climate then i'm sure they will last a lot longer.
    Proud to represent Mojo Wheels.

  10. #10
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    fixing loose ball hubs is easy, but you have to do it a lot. cartridge are expensive to fix.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by joelsman
    cartridge are expensive to fix.
    not really. All you do is buy more bearings, that is the only expense unless you need someone to do it for you. But if you are doing it yourself then you just pull the old ones out and install the new ones. It actually takes less time to replace sealed bearings then going through the hassel of degreasing, removing, installing, greasing the bearings, then adjusting the cones for open bearings. But I have never had to touch any sealed bearing hubs I have used.... and I have been using laser lites for close to 2 years now w/ no issues. But when I have ran standard ball-bearings in the past, I have had to break down the hubs 2- 4 times a year (depending on ride time), and at least once every 1-2 months adjust/tighten the cones in the hubs, which is a pain in the a$$!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by joelsman
    fixing loose ball hubs is easy, but you have to do it a lot. cartridge are expensive to fix.

    comparatively, you will spend more $$ on a looseball over it's lifetime adjusting and rebuilding it, than you will on a cartridge hub. 99% of the time. sure i've had really cheap-o cartridge hubs that blew up every month... but those are the exception.
    Proud to represent Mojo Wheels.

  13. #13
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    Zero charisma

  14. #14
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    Matt Hunter has been riding them since Interbike 2008.....
    Look at any SX Trail ad in Decline recently,
    I don't know specs but if they live up to the current SAINT group they should be GNAR

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