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Thread: Rotor cleaning?

  1. #1
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    Rotor cleaning?

    While my bike is waiting for hubs i decidet to try my enduro 4's on my friends bike and the stopping power wasnt that great. Its most likly from when i bled them and got the fluid on the disc. How should i clean it? BTW its bled properly

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by shook_dh
    While my bike is waiting for hubs i decidet to try my enduro 4's on my friends bike and the stopping power wasnt that great. Its most likly from when i bled them and got the fluid on the disc. How should i clean it? BTW its bled properly
    Rubbing Alcohol

  3. #3
    Sedona, Az USA
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    if it was bled properly, fluid wouldnt get in the rotor !!! J/K

    clean with alcohol first, use fine fine sandpaper and water and wetsand the rotor, clean with alcohol again and use brand new pads.

    the wetsanding is good for creating an optimal surface for bedding in the new pads.

  4. #4
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    if you spilled on the rotor

    and rode the bike, then the pads are contaminated. Read the FAQ in "Brakes forum" for the myriad of fixes.

    Jim

  5. #5
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    Ok thanks for the help, ill use alcohol and wetsand it and replace the pads. It was my first time bleeding brakes so it was very messy

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by shook_dh
    Ok thanks for the help, ill use alcohol and wetsand it and replace the pads. It was my first time bleeding brakes so it was very messy
    Im not to sure about your exact brakes but most have a nipple on the bleeder nut that you hook up a piece of hose so that the fluid does not drip on to the rotors and pads. Its usually part of a bleed kit.

  7. #7
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    The moral of the story: Remove your wheel and pads when bleeding.

    Even if your real careful, a drip or two can ruin your pads.

  8. #8
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    Use tequila. 2 shots 4 u and 1 for each rotor. Pads are shot tho so put them in the oven at 450 for 20 mins and then give them a shot of tequila w/ a corona chaser. should be fine after that.
    I watch the O.C. cause it makes me happy...

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  9. #9
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    Why does everyone reccomend wet sanding the rotors???

    I hear a lot of people saying this, but I was under the impression that that cause squeal.
    I agree that the pads are contaminated...I've even heard of "baking" the pads like danny suggested...buy if you rough up the rotor you wear out pads faster and if it's the slightest bit uneven they squeal like a pig.

    The friction is not between the rotors and pads. The pads actually transfer a thin layer of material to the disc and that creates the friction. You never want to touch the disc. I use soap and water to clean the discs...some times alcohol if it's really dirty or sticky.
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  10. #10
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    lol oh man this is funny

    rubbing booze if u just spill some on,
    if u ride with it, then you need to heat the **** out of the rotors/pads, which will not hurt the rotors too bad, but dont warp them, u can heat the pads with a torch, but you will greatly reduce the life span of them. Once you actually ride with oil on them, it will be imbedded inside every little pore. Wetsand is a great way to clean disc and stop scrubbing. but also know it takes awhile for the pads/rotors to become broke in, after 3 hours of hard braking they will pick up in power. remember to really burn em in, just a slight little brake wont, actuall y haul it and brake hard, it will create a better level surface on the rotor which will pay off in the long run. yes never bleed or open the line with ur wheels in the dropouts, i even take the pads out. years of race brakes on dirtbikes and sleds have taught me alot. You may have to buy new pads in the end. hope r great brakes

  11. #11
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    Dont sand the rotors ever. Clean with alcohol, soak em iff you have to and use 00 steel wool to clean the rotors well.

    Pads with brake fluid? hmm.. usually (99%) they are wrecked and need to be replaced -- but if they are contaminated with lube/oil or other, I have been able to successfuly rescue pads by leaving them soaking in a shallow dish of alcohol and adjutating occasionally, than scuffing them lightly on a piece of clean shirt cardboard (as you would for polishing brass or other soft metals.)

    Also, alot of mechanics prefet to LEAVE the pads and rotor in place to ensure a proper bleed and lever throw. Without the correctpad to disc setup you can under or overfill the system; although if you overfill, you can back the system out . If you remove the pads and rotor and leave them oput for the bleed, the pistons will extend and possibly overextend, put something in there -- i have some 75% worn out pads that I will install with a spacer between for bleeding, but since I havent spilled a drop of fluid in 10+ bleeds, I leave everything alone and simply wrap a clean rag around the caliper and on top of the rotor in the event of a spill -- yank it off before the fluid can travelif you have a spill/etc!!

    I find all brake systems easy to bleed - dont understand the comparison of one brake to another based on ease of bleeding. If you are not a qualified mechanic, you shouldnt be touching stuff and expecting good results!!!
    Last edited by Huck Banzai; 06-24-2005 at 05:17 PM.

  12. #12
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    U dont have to be a qualified mechanic to bleed brakes... i have spilled them because i didnt even have the manual to explain me in detail how to do it, i just knew the basic steps

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shook_dh
    U dont have to be a qualified mechanic to bleed brakes... i have spilled them because i didnt even have the manual to explain me in detail how to do it, i just knew the basic steps
    Qualified, as in you have the information necessary and the technical ability to complete the task -- you understand what your doing and are capable even if inexperience.

    I by no means meant certified or professional -- I havent worked as a shop mech in almost 20 years!

    Alot of people break equipment or experience poor performance due to over or undertightening, misadjusted parts etc and then go on to blame the part for being faulty or claim that it 'sucks', that one is better than another -- these are the unqualified people I'm talking about.

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