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  1. #1
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    One Bike for Everything???

    I am kinda new to DH and bike parks and I own a 2015 SC Bronson aluminum 650b bike. I spent a week at Whistler recently and had the pleasure of riding a full on DH Giant Glory. While riding the Glory there, I was very comfortable and confident in my abilities, and that was my first ever time riding DH. I enjoyed it so much that once we got back home to the States I went to our "local" DH park, Beech Mountain in Banner Elk, NC. I didn't rent a bike at Beech, instead I rode my Bronson and had zero issues. Of course I am not skilled enough to ride the pro lines or black diamond lines yet, but I did great on all the Beginner/Intermediate lines. My bike is mainly stock, with the exception of Saint Cranks and Saint Brakes, Deity Cavity 35mm stem and converted to 1x with Wolftooth 30t ring. Everything else is just as it came from the factory. Is it dumb of me to think I would be ok with only this bike in my stable? I know most DH/FR bikes have coil suspension and at least one more inch of travel. But is it too crazy to think my Bronson will work for long term use at bike parks like this? Is there some sort of rule for using air suspension at places like this? I am not against buying a dedicated park bike, but if I can get away without it, then I'd rather not. If the consensus is that I shouldn't press my luck with my Bronson (which I also use for every day trail riding) I will be considering the Airborne Toxin complete. Just curious what the opinions are of the more experienced??? Speak freely, I'm a big boy and it won't hurt my feelings if you tell me I'm crazy...
    Last edited by New Guy; 10-04-2015 at 02:52 PM.

  2. #2
    Uphill? What's that
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    How often are you going to be riding downhill would be the first thing I would ask. If you are only going to tackle downhill trails once a month or less than I would say stick with what you got. If you find yourself at a bike park a couple times a month than you might want to consider a downhill bike.
    Also: the Toxin is not a downhill bike.. The. Bronson is a more capable bike in my opinion.

  3. #3
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    Well the closest DH park to me is closed for winter now. But we have a year round park that just opened up about 3 hours away. That may be a once a month trip. Plus we have another place 1.5 hours from us that has gravity trails, but you have to push back to the top. I would say in spring/summer will definitely be more than once a month. More like once a week. So maybe my current bike won't be enough after all. And I know the Toxin isn't a dedicated DH bike but I figured it would be better than what I have? Maybe not. I have even considered trading my Bronson for a Specialized Enduro Elite but it is the same travel I have now just with more aggressive geometry.

  4. #4
    Uphill? What's that
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    I think the Enduro would definitely be a better choice .

  5. #5
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    I have a friend that rides a Bronson for DH and just kills it....does 30 foot doubles, rides the knarly stuff just like a dh bike...it all about what you like
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  6. #6
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    The Bronson will allow you to have a lot of fun, for sure. But as you are aware, a DH bike is almost always better for bike parks and local gravity trails. The biggest difference I notice is that I feel less tired on a dh bike. That bit more travel and slacker geometry really helps mitigate the beating my body takes. Especially the fatigue in my forearms and hands.

    So yes, a DH bike is the best tool for the job. No doubt about it. But, if the nearest bike park is 3 hours away, I have a feeling you will end up riding the Bronson more and traveling to the bike park less as time goes on. That's 6+ hours of driving and extra gas money every time you go. If the bike park is open for only 5 months out of the year, that's 5 times going up there if you can't go more than once a month. Hard to justify getting a new bike just for a handful of rides a year (in my opinion). If you're a good rider and don't ham-fist your way through everything, your Bronson should be able to handle the occasional bike park trip well. The main thing a DH bike would do is decrease your learning curve on the more advanced trails.

    But if you're pretty committed to getting another bike, I'd look for a used DH bike, rather than a new Toxin. Yeah, new is cool. but there's a reason the Toxin is as cheap as it is. If dh park riding is something that you're going to be doing pretty irregularly, there are far better bikes to be had, and for cheaper, if you buy used. Full DH bikes will kill a Toxin.You can find a used Glory for the same price as a new Toxin, and it will be a far better bike, with better components, better suspension design, etc.

    Now, if you want to get a Holy Grail bike (pedalable DH bike) that will handle everything and handle it well, a Canfield One would fit the bill. Super good bike. Burly, nimble, and pedals quite well for an 8-inch bike. It will pedal as well or better than an Enduro, and it will eat the Enduro for breakfast when the trails get steep and rough. But they're hard to come by, as their owners, myself included, are very loyal and don't get rid of them very often.
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  7. #7
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    Get a used DH bike, see if you use it enough to justify buying one new down the road. Keep the Bronson for XC and trail riding, it's perfectly capable but DH bikes are more fun for DH.
    "That which does not kill you makes you stronger"

  8. #8
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    Canfield One!
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  9. #9
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    If you can find a Canadian that is willing to ship to the US you can find even better deals since CAD is 75 cents on the US dollar, example, a 2000 CAD bike on PB is 1500 USD. Even with the increase shipping costs and trade tariffs you'll still be a head.

    But to answer your question one of the guys who runs the tacoed shell who cater Bailey mountain rides santa cruz heckler and he rode up on the last few shuttles of the day and was fine. Granted he wasn't doing laps all day long so the bike wasn't getting beat up all day long. When I was up there I saw a Bronon (with a Ohlins coil shock), Knolly (single crown not podium) and Spec Enduro. For a once a month deal I think the bike is good enough.

    Now wanting vs needing a DH bike well you've probably already made that decision

  10. #10
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    Save your Bronson. Dh will wear out an AM bike pretty quick. If you liked the Glory, they can be had pretty cheap.

  11. #11
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    How to tell if you need a longer travel bike:

    - When you find yourself consistently riding terrain where you know you'd be having a lot more fun on a bigger bike.

    It doesn't sound like you've met that condition yet.

  12. #12
    Sedona, Az USA
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    keep the bronson and ride it hard. see how your skills progress. rent the newest DH bikes during your travels. you can buy 26" wheeled DH bikes cheap. $2k gets you something pretty darn nice.

    To keep with just one bike going forward, the sc Nomad is more on the DH side of the all-mountain spectrum. As is the new carbon Transition Patrol or the Yeti SB6.

    But there is nothing wrong with your ride, especially with your limited access to riding only part of the year. If you lived in Whistler, I'd say get a new 27.5 8" DH rig.

  13. #13
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    Canfield ONE. The ONLY true do-it-all bike. I take mine on 30+ mile loop rides and mash it at the bike park.

    There are actually a few on PB for sale right now, one with a partial build for $1500...

  14. #14
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    Can't say I would ride Whistler brake bumps on a 150 mm bike if I had a choice, but maybe your local hill is smoother.

    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    ...The main thing a DH bike would do is decrease your learning curve on the more advanced trails...
    Probably also save you from some crashes. It's amazing the sort of stupid cases and poor line choice that extra bit of suspension can soak up.

  15. #15
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    I had never even heard of Canfield before this thread. So you guys are telling me that their full on DH bike can be ridden on single track/all mountain type trails and climb just like an all mountain bike? Then absolutely slay a DH run like no other bike? Why don't everyone have one of these bikes? Are they seriously that good?

  16. #16
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    The Canfield One and its predecessor are built as "all purpose" machines I do believe. Lots use them for dh, park and superD racing. SuperD is a mix of DH and xc
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by New Guy View Post
    I had never even heard of Canfield before this thread. So you guys are telling me that their full on DH bike can be ridden on single track/all mountain type trails and climb just like an all mountain bike? Then absolutely slay a DH run like no other bike? Why don't everyone have one of these bikes? Are they seriously that good?

    If only it was that easy. There is no such thing as a bike that can do everything just as there is not one tool for every job. I ride an HD that is pretty good at everything. But in no way can it replace my DH bike in the park or down legit DH.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by M1_joel View Post
    sc Nomad
    +1! It pedals so good I take mine on 30 mile epics even with a Vivid Air, and it slays the dh. No brainer.

  19. #19
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    Based on your your first post I'd recommend just getting a cheap used DH bike for the park, or just using your Bronson and staying away from the trails that will really beat the crap out of it.

    Having said that, here are some thoughts on going the "one bike" route.

    There is no such thing as a "one" bike that is perfect for everything. There are such things as "one" bikes that are good at a LOT of things, but with some compromises - which may or may not be fine for you depending on what you're after.

    There are a number of bikes that are great AM bikes that can do a decent amount of DH park use these days, especially on flowier DH trails. Since you have a Santa Cruz, looking at their lineup the Nomad is more in that category, but I'm sure you could get by with a Bronson. If you're set on using that particular bike at the park, one thing you might think about is a separate wheelset for DH use. Burlier rims and especially burlier tires. That is a where a large amount of the abuse happens, and having some big ass tires can make a huge difference on the DH.

    For bikes that can really kill it on the DH and are still OK for climbing, the list is a lot smaller. All the rabid Canfield fanboys come out of the woodwork whenever this question comes up, and as you've seen they think their bike is the only one that can cut it , but that's not quite true. A lot of people seem to like the Guerrilla Gravity Megatrail for that too. Personally I've been using a Specialized Enduro Evo (not to be confused with the regular Enduro, this is basically an Enduro on steroids) as my one do-everything bike, sometimes switching out wheelsets as mentioned above. I wrote up some info you might find useful on another forum here:

    Enduro Evo Feedback? | Ridemonkey.com

    I've since switched to an Ohlins shock, which is even better than the CCDB. Downhill performance is stellar. Climbing is surprisingly decent, and I can reach down and crank up the LSC for longer climbs on the fly. More info on that starting here:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/specialized/o...l#post12194130

  20. #20
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    Thanks everybody for the ideas. I would say next year when our DH places open back up I will be there at least 3 times a month. Maybe more. I don't mind the 2 hour drive there to ride some DH. That said, I will be looking at some used DH bikes. I don't think I "need" it yet, as my riding skill isn't there yet, but I definitely want it. I am 41 years old, so the ol bones can't take much beating like they used to. I raced BMX all of last year and half of this year then got back into MTB, so I can ride, just not pro level. I'm not brave enough to do huge gaps and doubles, but I like to jump tables and stuff. So a DH bike will probably suit me better in the long run.

  21. #21
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    Ol Bones will appreciate an 8" travel DH bike

  22. #22
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    A lot of mountains (at least up here in NE) sell their bikes off just about each year. Even if you budget in a couple hundred to have a bike shop give it a tune up (if you don't do it yourself) you can still get a pretty good deal on a bike you're familiar with.

    This past season I found a used DH bike on CL and pulled the trigger. It's made going to the bike park much more fun and my riding has improved greatly.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimw View Post
    There is no such thing as a "one" bike that is perfect for everything.


    For bikes that can really kill it on the DH and are still OK for climbing, the list is a lot smaller. All the rabid Canfield fanboys come out of the woodwork whenever this question comes up, and as you've seen they think their bike is the only one that can cut it , but that's not quite true.

    Just wanted to respond to the claims. Not hating on you at all, so don't take it personally. But the Canfield One is a far more aggressive bike than an Enduro Evo. FAR more. Not even in the same class. I feel I can speak on the Enduro Evo, as I've ridden multiple builds numerous times (26, 27.5, and 29er). My brother was also sponsored by Speshy for the past few years (road and mtb). He agrees that the One is in a class of its own.

    The Evo is nice and slack, but it's still a 7-inch bike. It's an A Line slaying park bike, not an In Deep slayer. That extra 1" of most DH bikes makes a big difference when riding the rough DH trails. Takes more of the abuse out of the hands, wrists, etc as the shock doesn't ramp up quite as fast. The One has the full 8", and it still pedals as well, if not better, than the Enduro Evo. Weighs about the same as the aluminum Enduro, too.

    Honestly, the Canfield One fanboys come out for a reason. It really is that good. Very different than anything else I've tried. I've tried Nomads, Enduros (both Evo and regular), Konas, Reign Xs, Uzzis, and many more. The Megatrail is supposedly a good bike, but I haven't ridden one, so I can't comment on it. But in terms of DH capability and still being able to pedal well, I searched for years before settling on the One. It outdoes everything else I've ridden by such a huge margin, it's not even a contest.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    But the Canfield One is a far more aggressive bike than an Enduro Evo. FAR more. Not even in the same class. I feel I can speak on the Enduro Evo, as I've ridden multiple builds numerous times (26, 27.5, and 29er). My brother was also sponsored by Speshy for the past few years (road and mtb). He agrees that the One is in a class of its own.

    The Evo is nice and slack, but it's still a 7-inch bike. It's an A Line slaying park bike, not an In Deep slayer. That extra 1" of most DH bikes makes a big difference when riding the rough DH trails. Takes more of the abuse out of the hands, wrists, etc as the shock doesn't ramp up quite as fast. The One has the full 8", and it still pedals as well, if not better, than the Enduro Evo. Weighs about the same as the aluminum Enduro, too.
    Dude, no. I'm familiar with both, bought an EVO, have ridden the Canfield (almost bought one) and would be happy with a One if they updated the geo. I can get down trails like In Deep and Goats just as fast on my EVO as I do on my DH bike (Yeti 303). The Canfield may be a better bike for you, but to say it's far better as a DH bike is contrary to my experience; to try to say it's not even in the same class is ********.


  25. #25
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    One bike for everything? A great deal of that statement is mind over matter. Some people can't climb on a bike unless it is sub-28 pounds and has a 69+ degree head tube angle. Then, of course, they can't ride gnarly descents as fast or as safely. But, on that same token, some people won't even think about riding down something "black diamond-ish" unless they're aboard a 9"+ travel bike with a 63* HA.

    There are finally bikes now that you can ride all day and yet they'll handle just about anything you throw at them. While my '12 Spec. SX Trail is a few years old now, the geometry is pretty much current. It has 7" of front and rear travel and about a 65* HA (haven't actually measured it -- but it's fairly slack.) It weighs about 35 pounds.

    Anyway, a few weekends ago, I took it for a 5 hour epic ride featuring 4k feet of climbing in about 25 miles. Had an absolute blast/would do again. I can also outclimb nearly everyone I encounter on the most popular local trail which features a 1250' climb in 3 miles -- even the XC bike riders. Simply put -- I stopped caring about bike weight, lost 20 pounds myself, and became a beast this year. I haven't been this fast in over 10 years. The best part is that my bike absolutely RAILS corners and gnarly stuff, is playful on jumps, and is built tough enough that it can support my 190 pounds riding hard.

    I've never been happier with a bike for all-around riding.
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  26. #26
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    I took for granted how nice my Spec Enduro's seat angle was for climbing. It's not as common as I thought to find a bike that not only descends well, but climbs really well, only slowed down by weight and rolling resistance really. Had to come to terms with these new low slung bikes with short stubby seat tubes, that have poor pedaling ergonomics for seated climb. Bikes that descend well don't have to suck at climbing!

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    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    Just wanted to respond to the claims. Not hating on you at all, so don't take it personally. But the Canfield One is a far more aggressive bike than an Enduro Evo. FAR more. Not even in the same class. I feel I can speak on the Enduro Evo, as I've ridden multiple builds numerous times (26, 27.5, and 29er). My brother was also sponsored by Speshy for the past few years (road and mtb). He agrees that the One is in a class of its own.

    The Evo is nice and slack, but it's still a 7-inch bike. It's an A Line slaying park bike, not an In Deep slayer. That extra 1" of most DH bikes makes a big difference when riding the rough DH trails. Takes more of the abuse out of the hands, wrists, etc as the shock doesn't ramp up quite as fast. The One has the full 8", and it still pedals as well, if not better, than the Enduro Evo. Weighs about the same as the aluminum Enduro, too.

    Honestly, the Canfield One fanboys come out for a reason. It really is that good. Very different than anything else I've tried. I've tried Nomads, Enduros (both Evo and regular), Konas, Reign Xs, Uzzis, and many more. The Megatrail is supposedly a good bike, but I haven't ridden one, so I can't comment on it. But in terms of DH capability and still being able to pedal well, I searched for years before settling on the One. It outdoes everything else I've ridden by such a huge margin, it's not even a contest.
    It's always good to have another inch when you're going "in Deep!"

  28. #28
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    One Bike for Everything???

    id buy a dh bike. youll have more fun and wont worry about your Bronson = youll have even more fun

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by djjohnr View Post
    Dude, no. I'm familiar with both, bought an EVO, have ridden the Canfield (almost bought one) and would be happy with a One if they updated the geo. I can get down trails like In Deep and Goats just as fast on my EVO as I do on my DH bike (Yeti 303). The Canfield may be a better bike for you, but to say it's far better as a DH bike is contrary to my experience; to try to say it's not even in the same class is ********.

    Nice bike for sure, I've seen people riding them at the park with great success.

    Do you use this same setup for 30+ mile rides with 3-4k climbing/descents?

    This is my ONE. It literally rides everything, very well. Granted, it doesn't plow through high speed tech lines as well as it's big brother, the Jedi. Nor does it pedal up as well as a hard tail 29er. BUT, as far as "do-it-all" bikes goes, this bike for sure covers more of the spectrum than any other frame out there. 8" rear, 7" front travel. Full DH build (dual ply tires, 203 rotors). Dropper post. Just converted to full air suspension with a Vector Air and a Metric HLR, weighs 32 lbs. I ride it with my friends on their DH bikes and keep up no problem, also take it on 30+ mile epics. I'm a fat a$$ too, 220#.

    One Bike for Everything???-p4pb10910370.jpg

    Only other frames out there that come as close to covering both ends of the spectrum (that I've ridden or been able to compare) are Banshee Rune and Pivot Mach 6. All the other frames are focused more on one aspect or the other, from my experience.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRage43 View Post
    Nice bike for sure, I've seen people riding them at the park with great success.

    Do you use this same setup for 30+ mile rides with 3-4k climbing/descents?

    This is my ONE. It literally rides everything, very well. Granted, it doesn't plow through high speed tech lines as well as it's big brother, the Jedi. Nor does it pedal up as well as a hard tail 29er. BUT, as far as "do-it-all" bikes goes, this bike for sure covers more of the spectrum than any other frame out there. 8" rear, 7" front travel. Full DH build (dual ply tires, 203 rotors). Dropper post. Just converted to full air suspension with a Vector Air and a Metric HLR, weighs 32 lbs. I ride it with my friends on their DH bikes and keep up no problem, also take it on 30+ mile epics. I'm a fat a$$ too, 220#.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Only other frames out there that come as close to covering both ends of the spectrum (that I've ridden or been able to compare) are Banshee Rune and Pivot Mach 6. All the other frames are focused more on one aspect or the other, from my experience.
    Nice whip. Yes I've used it on 3k+ rides. I've done it as pictured (8" fork w/ 26" wheels) and it does fine, but swapping to a 180mm 36 with a 27.5 up front makes it easier. I'm interested to see if Canfield will come out with a 7/8" Balance.

    Some other bikes coming out that are similar: ~180mm+ travel bikes with DH geometry and pedal friendly seat tubes that you can actually order easily in the US -

    - 2016 Intense Uzzi

    - Cube Fritzz 180: HA is 65.5 but you could slacken it out with some cups - CUBE Fritzz 180 HPA SL 27.5 metalŽnŽflashred 2016

    - Liteville 601: BB is 14", but you could fix it with a 26" out back -LITEVILLE - ENDURO WERKSMASCHINE - 601 - PRODUCTS - HOME

    - NS Soda EVO - NS Bikes - Soda Evo Air - Freeride / Bike park / Mini DH

    - Canyon Torque: not available in the US yet, but says they're coming. Steep HA, but should be fixable with cups - https://www.canyon.com/en/gravity/to...x-gapstar.html

    - Nicolai: they'll do custom IONs. I may go this direction next.

    - Canfield: Lance said a 7-8" Balance is a possibility.

  31. #31
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    +1 for the NS Soda Evo Air.

    I have a 2011 Jedi and replaced my AM bike with an NS Soda Evo Air this summer... The Jedi is still my first choice for DH but if anything goes wrong with it I won't hesitate to bring the Soda instead. 180mm, 33 pounds with dropper, climbs fine. 14" BB with the stock 27.5 wheels, and I just put tires on a 26" set that I'll be trying soon (with 20mm shorter chainstays). Really happy with it in 27.5, and looking forward to trying it in 26.

    That said, I'd love to see an 8" Balance with rearward axle path. Not so much that it needs an upper pulley, but as much as a long-cage derailleur can accommodate. I totally don't need a new bike, but for that I'd probably reach for my wallet anyway.

  32. #32
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    Here's an oldie to consider, .. Santa Cruz Bullit
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    Thanks again guys. I'm gonna ride the hell outta the Bronson and when I feel like my skill level is above what I can do with that bike I will buy a dedicated DH rig. Probably actually build one at that point.

  34. #34
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    See list below for ENDURO bikes that feel good on the steeps...

    1. Megatrail
    2. Insurgent
    3. Mondraker Dune
    4. Nicolai Mojo

    All are long, low and slack.....

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