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  1. #1
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    New marz's

    Ok so i tried to bounce on the new 888 evo TI.

    THe regular evo, is about 500 grams heavier, and half the price, but are they similar in performance ?

    I mean is the TI just lighter or does it have other boosts to it over the regular rc3 evo ?

    ofc these are for the 2010 models only

    So anyone had a bounce on both and can tell the difference ?

    Cos honestly im not too bothered about the extra weight.

  2. #2
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    I'm sure SMT will be here to give you the "inside" scoop. Hell, he's probably in the office right now running a statement through Tenneco's lawyers.

  3. #3
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    that would be great

    I mean if the reg evo is anywhere near the TI, screw the extra weight, as its the hands down best feeling fork ive ever tried.

    the only other fork ive tried that was anywhere near as plush and still rideable was a old 05 extra soft boxxer WC, the last of the boxxer WC coils

  4. #4
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    They're the same, just lighter bits with the ti.

  5. #5
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    I'm opening a can of worms but here goes:
    Anyone that's ridden identical rate ti and steel springs back to back on otherwise identical setups will tell you that ti springs are more supple over small bumps. The lower mass ti springs accelerate faster. It's not huge but it's definitely noticeable.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Blonde
    I'm opening a can of worms but here goes:
    Anyone that's ridden identical rate ti and steel springs back to back on otherwise identical setups will tell you that ti springs are more supple over small bumps. The lower mass ti springs accelerate faster. It's not huge but it's definitely noticeable.
    it will only be a very small difference, i doubt it will make you ride the rough stuff faster, just accelerate and decelerate the bike faster due to lower weight, performance wise should be almost identical.
    Quote Originally Posted by [Orge
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    This problem could quite simply be solved if people would stop buying Konas.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bxxer rider
    it will only be a very small difference, i doubt it will make you ride the rough stuff faster, just accelerate and decelerate the bike faster due to lower weight, performance wise should be almost identical.

    Please leave.

  8. #8
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    Guts are all the same. Ti has tapered stanchions, ti spring, and ti hardware.

    Titanium rebounds differently than steel does.
    805

  9. #9
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    well, that just really means that to get "identical" performance then, a simple spring change is needed.

  10. #10
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    Ti springs will NOT fit in the regular Evo chassis. The stanchion ID is different between the two (the silver stanchions are larger OD, thinner walls).

    Steel springs fit in the Evo Ti fork, but ti springs do not fit in the regular Evo fork.
    805

  11. #11
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    ahh bastards..

    so this just puts me back on the boxxer track, where i can at least upgrade the inners later on when i want to.

  12. #12
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    Uhhh, you wouldn't ever really need to upgrade the "inners" on an evo. It's just a shim stack and you can have it tuned if that's what you need. Why try and polish a turd with the boxxers?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitz
    I'm sure SMT will be here to give you the "inside" scoop. Hell, he's probably in the office right now running a statement through Tenneco's lawyers.
    I am keeping mum....the Lawyers are gone for the holiday
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeanH

    , as its the hands down best feeling fork ive ever tried.
    you will here this time and time again.....it is simply amazing
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  15. #15
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    You guys are still holding onto the idea the Ti springs ride different because of material differences? Seriously?

    The input frequency rates of MTB suspension combined with the inherent damping from seals, and other un-aviodable friction negates any mathematical differences in the material properties...not to mention the additional damping that ALL mtb suspension uses. Furthermore, Ti springs are an alloy (as are all steel springs). There are many different ti alloys, that go thorugh any number of heat treatment, surface treatments. No you add differing designs including ID, OD, wire diameter, wire shape, coil pitch, end coil design, etc, etc.

    Comparing all 'steel' springs to 'ti' springs even if you were to actually calculate theoretical properties of a particular alloy of your choice, has absolutely zero revelance to the real world as you do not know the actual material, the design parameters, the total damping funcion of the system, the mass of the sprung and unsprung masses...

    Ti spings in a fork designed with any longevity (because of the physical envelope that the spring must fit in) save VERY little weight...and yes I have actually looked at this from a real world mfg perspective. To attempt to get a noticable weight change(and justify the added $$), fewer coils are used, and durability is significantly reduced..(see regularly broken Fox ti forks springs).

    At the very best, you could argue that there is a change in unsprung mass, but the average difference in mass due to the spring is only half of the change in spring mass. So for example, a 100g reduction in spring mass (a realistic figure on a twin spring fork design) you only realize a reduction of about 50g total in unsprung weight.
    You can feel a difference in suspension action by snipping off a few tire knobs? Changing to aluminum nipples? removing your rim tape?

    On a rear shock, the rrealized reduciton is even less due to the wheel to shock movement ratio. A spring on average moves only 1/3 of the distance of the wheel. So equivalent change of unsprung mass on a rear shock do to the spring... is approximately 1/6 of the difference in spring weights. That is about 1/4 of one percent change in unsprung weight.

    Ti springs feel different because they are closer to their stated K value because of better mfg processes. Cheap steel springs(all mtb springs) vary wildly. For an average rear spring, it would not be uncommon for a spring to be off by 25 - 50 lb/inch.

  16. #16
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    I just got a 888 evo ti. Like it alot so far. Can't comment on the ride difference with the ti. But one difference that hasn't been mentioned are the nickle plated stanctions...oooohh shiny
    JRA

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bxxer rider
    it will only be a very small difference, i doubt it will make you ride the rough stuff faster, just accelerate and decelerate the bike faster due to lower weight, performance wise should be almost identical.
    Do you have experience with comparing ti/steel springs in marzo forks? No...
    Slow is cool too, right?

  18. #18
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    ooh so slick and smooth as well. check your oil level. mine was too high and i never used the last inch of travel.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bxxer rider
    it will only be a very small difference, i doubt it will make you ride the rough stuff faster, just accelerate and decelerate the bike faster due to lower weight, performance wise should be almost identical.

    Haha, ever seen the Wizard of Oz? You should be singing the scare crow's song...

  20. #20
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    It is total BS that there is a different "feel" between ti and steel springs. Given the same spring rate, they will feel identical. The only advantage is weight.
    Ocala Mountain Bike Association - www.omba.org

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim311
    It is total BS that there is a different "feel" between ti and steel springs. Given the same spring rate, they will feel identical. The only advantage is weight.
    No, they don't. There is a noticeable difference in the feel of a Ti spring vs steel at the same weight.
    Is Ti worth the extra $? That is a question everyone has to answer for themselves.

  22. #22
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    what davep said.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonbonan
    I would say Ti will more reliable than steel. If you know more about the internal structure or bonding definitely will say Ti better.
    Dear e-engineer: scroll higher up the page, and read davep's input. He is an ACTUAL engineer who works with the vary materials being discussed.

    Ti is more reliable then steel? I'll highlight the relevant parts, since you clearly missed them the first time around.

    Quote Originally Posted by davep
    Ti spings in a fork designed with any longevity (because of the physical envelope that the spring must fit in) save VERY little weight...and yes I have actually looked at this from a real world mfg perspective. To attempt to get a noticable weight change(and justify the added $$), fewer coils are used, and durability is significantly reduced..(see regularly broken Fox ti forks springs).

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1soulrider
    No, they don't. There is a noticeable difference in the feel of a Ti spring vs steel at the same weight.

    You are wrong there. The difference in the rebound and compression (as mentioned above by the aforementioned engineer) are so minimal that the stiction/friction negate any possible benefits in that regards. Ti does not "feel" any better, it's all a placebo. People want to believe it rides better to help justify their often very expensive purchase.
    Ocala Mountain Bike Association - www.omba.org

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