Magura mini-service bleed kit- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Magura mini-service bleed kit

    I figured I'd post this here rather than the "brake time" forum since there's not a lot of traffic in there and a lot of people in here are probably running gustavs or louises.

    How easy is this kit to use? I need to bleed my gustavs before saturday, and I should be getting the kit in the mail thursday. I'm new to DH so I've never bled a pair of brakes before. I've read some stories in the brake forum about brakes that are very difficult to bleed and I'm wondering if I'll need to recruit a second pair of hands for the job.

    I've downloaded the instructions for the gustavs off the magura website, and they don't SEEM too complicated but I'm worried that they might be assuming a higher level of competence than what I've got, haha.

    Thanks for any info/experience you guys have!

  2. #2
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    maguras are difficult to bleed. give it a shot but if it does not work out take it to a GOOD shop

  3. #3
    GERONIMO!!!!!!!
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    you bleed them from the bottom up and it is easier with two pairs of hands, one on the caliper and one on the lever.
    oh and make sure you lever is level when you are bleeding

  4. #4
    Err
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    Perfect Magura Bleed -
    1. remove brake(s) from bike
    2. Hang brake so that there is a perfect vertical line from caliper to lever
    3. Fill syringe with hose attached 3/4 full, allow bubbles to settle
    4. Attach syringe to caliper.
    5. Pull on syringe to extract any air bubbles introduced to the caliper in step 4
    6. Push back in on syringe a little so that you're no longer creating a vacum.
    7. On new style levers, open bleed port on top and stick a syringe in there, on old style levers you'll have to pull fluid out of the master cylinder as it rises (this is a PITA).
    8. Push most of the fluid in the bottom syringe to the top.
    9. Close up top
    10. Remove syringe from bottom.
    11. Refill bottom syringe 3/4 full and repeat bleeding process once or twice more.
    12. On your last bleed, after closing up the master cylinder, before removing bottom syringe. Put pads in caliper, place rotor inside pads and force fluid into the caliper until pads clamp down on rotor. Remove rotor, remove pads, remove syringe.
    13. Clean everything up and reinstall brakes.

    Enjoy perfect, completely air bubble free braking

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the input, guys.

    Err, I'm gonna print that out and keep it with my when I make my attempt.

    How new do the brakes have to be in order to have the "new style levers"? I have no idea what year the Gustavs on my bike are, is there any easy way to tell?

  6. #6
    Err
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    I think '08 was the first year for the bleed port on the lever assembly. You'll have to suck excess mineral oil out of the master cylinder as you push it up from the bottom.

    If you have a bike stand and a spare handlebar lying around, clamp the bars in the stand, slide your brake on it and let the caliper dangle. That's the easiest way.

    BTW, you can bleed the brakes on the bike but you'll almost certainly have some amount of air left in the lines. Following the method above consistently gets the air completely out.

  7. #7
    Oh, So Interesting!
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    I just got a glue syringe for $1.99 from the hardware store, cut the end a bit, and thread the tip of the syringe into the caliper. I've never found removing the brakes necessary, but you need to rotate the lever on the bars so the resevoir is level. I also tap on the caliper and line as I push the fluid up to dislodge any air bubbles that might get trapped. With the tapping, theres no need to repeat the process. I also get rid of all the fluid in the system before bleeding, which means you don't have to take fluid off the top end. I want to start with all fresh fluid. If you have new pads the pistons will be in the right position, if they're worn you might want to push the pistons in a little to avoid overfilling the system. If you push the caliper back too far you'll underfill, but you don't have to get it exact.

    Make sure you only use Magura brand mineral oil brake fluid. Mineral oil varies too much to substitute anything else. A pint is lifetime supply (its looking like for me), the only time I've had to bleed them are replacing brake lines and master cylinders... the calipers are doing fine after a few years and Magura replaced 2 lever asemblies for free. I have a Gustav front and Louise rear.

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