Lightening the Blindside- your suggestions?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Lightening the Blindside- your suggestions?

    Hey all,

    Well, I have a Blindside, as it is built right now, it sits at 42.8#. It's a great bike, but when I built it, Northstar was open and I caught the bug, the bigger the better. Now that N* is closed, I'm still riding DH, but not as gnarly as N*, and realize that I want to switch out some things, make it lighter, and a little less "piggish"(?).

    Here's how it currently stands.

    Notable features: 888 WC (CC flush headset), XT cranks, Atomlab Pimps laced to Hadleys, Specialized Pinner's, ROCO WC, Avid Codes.

    I'm gonna do a tubeless conversion, pick up some Schwalbe Big Betty's, about 150g (claimed) lighter than the PInners. Hopefully w/ those and tubeless, I could drop a pound.

    I'm thinking I'm gonna sell the 888, and pick up a 66 ATA and a standard headset, so it wil keep, roughly, the same A to C that it has now. That should drop (claimed) 1.5 lbs.

    I need new pedals. I clipped a rock at Downieville, bent my left spindle (and seperated my shoulder). Current pedals are Time Z with a claimed weight of 563g. Any suggestions on pedals? Think Acids would hold up?

    Other than that, I am pretty much open to suggestions. I still want the bike to be able to take a beating, N* in the summer, Whistler for a week this upcoming summer.

    Well, thoughts?

  2. #2
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    most bang for your buck would be new wheels, going tubeless or getting new wheels that are tubeless. Maybe a ti spring and some pedals. Give the wellgo mg-1s a shot for the pedals... they are really inexpensive, pretty nice, and light as hell.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by njhcx4xlife
    most bang for your buck would be new wheels, going tubeless or getting new wheels that are tubeless. Maybe a ti spring and some pedals. Give the wellgo mg-1s a shot for the pedals... they are really inexpensive, pretty nice, and light as hell.
    Yeah, I've thought about getting a new wheelset. Correct me if I'm wrong, but running a UST rim and UST tire will (generally) be lighter than a non UST rim and non UST tire and Stans?

    As for the Ti spring, I've though about it, I need a stiffer spring anyway... As for pedals, I need clipless

  4. #4
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    Get some new wheels, the ones you have are TANKS, try an LG1 too, and an Ibeam post and saddle will help.


    Keep the 888, there super nice, screw air forks on a dh bike
    Pump Tracks Are Rad!!!!

  5. #5
    EastBaySteez
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    Man I say leave it as is. Shes a beaut!
    Go tubeless and get a Ti Spring.

    You have to remember that you will be going to N* again. So bigger is still better!
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  6. #6
    EastBaySteez
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    Quote Originally Posted by themontashu
    and an Ibeam post and saddle will help.
    Ewww! I have one on my 7point, Really uncomfortable, and they have a tendency to break. I know personally 3 people who have broken the Ibeam seats.
    Gamut
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by motormonkeyr6
    You have to remember that you will be going to N* again. So bigger is still better!
    Haha I know, I ran my Nomad up there a few times and it was super fun on the flowy trails (Synuous, Speed Control) and faired pretty well on trails like Gypsy.

    Any suggestions on some tubeless rims/wheelsets? Price really isn't an issue.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by motormonkeyr6
    Man I say leave it as is. Shes a beaut!
    Go tubeless and get a Ti Spring.

    You have to remember that you will be going to N* again. So bigger is still better!
    change halos (rims) to 823's
    Ti-spring
    new seat post (thompson or Ibeam)
    new seat
    get lighter pedals......

    drops 3 or 4 pounds easy
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  9. #9
    clyde in training
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    you could probably lose about a pound by shortening your cables haha

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by motormonkeyr6
    Ewww! I have one on my 7point, Really uncomfortable, and they have a tendency to break. I know personally 3 people who have broken the Ibeam seats.
    you are right they are not comfy.but at 119 grams for an Ifly saddle it is freaken light. They are plenty strong though. I am the defenition of a hack, and my Ifly is still going strong
    Pump Tracks Are Rad!!!!

  11. #11
    EastBaySteez
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    I wouldnt ditch the Times.
    If you like them run them.
    Pedals are one thing I wont skimp on. I had an oportunty to get a set of the Acids, but I stayed with my mallets.

    Maybe check out the 08 mallets. I heard they might be lighter.
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  12. #12
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    Drill holes anywhere on the frame where it doesn't rrrrreally matter!!!

    42lbs?!?!?!? dude, you have a 888 and 1" more travel than my bike AT the same weight. (well, mine's actually 42.2lbs)
    Drink less beer
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    change halos (rims) to 823's
    Ti-spring
    new seat post (thompson or Ibeam)
    new seat
    get lighter pedals......

    drops 3 or 4 pounds easy
    Thanks for the suggestions. The 823 are UST, correct? Therefore I would just need a UST tire, no Stans? And this is generally lighter than a Stans conversion?

    As for the seat, I ran the I-beam system on my Nomad, the saddle didn't bug me. Didn't put it on this bike just cause BTI didn't stock the 30.0. I'll have to go back to that.

    Any recommendations for tires? Right now where I'm riding, same terrain as D'ville. But next fall I'll most likely be moving to SLO, and don't mind picking up better tires for that area, unless you have a suggestion on a good all around tire.

    Still up in the air on the fork. I think it's a toss up between keeping the 888, the 66 ATA, or the 66 RC3. Where I ride now doesn't really warrant an 8" fork, and not sure if the DH near SLO does either (posted in the So Cal forum about that).

  14. #14
    Rb
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    Ask El Gordo. He's 240 lbs and is god of everything Transition...






    ha.

  15. #15
    Rb
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    On a serious note...

    1) Go tubeless and lighter tires. 2.5F, 2.35R (if you're smooooooth)
    2) Ti spring if you can afford it (law of diminishing returns applies here...)
    3) Thomson post

    Those 3 can bring it down to around 40.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rb
    Ask El Gordo. He's 240 lbs and is god of everything Transition...






    ha.
    Haha.
    Matt, do you mind re-posting a full spec list? I think that would help everyone determine what you're working with..

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by coiler8
    Haha.
    Matt, do you mind re-posting a full spec list? I think that would help everyone determine what you're working with..
    So far I'm pretty set on going tubeless (823's), SDG ibeam saddle+post, new pedals (unsure on which ones though), possible Ti spring (will have to see how the funds look after Christmas), and still unsure about the fork.

    Frame: Blindside, large, Raw
    Fork: Marzocchi 888 RC2X World Cup
    Shock: Marzocchi Roco World Cup
    Wheels: Hadleys laced to Atomlab Pimps via Torque Nipple + DT Champion spokes
    Tires: Specialized Pinner Pro 2.3
    Brakes: 08 Avid Code (203)
    Cranks: XT
    Chainring: E.13 Guide Ring
    Guide: E.13 SRS
    Casette: PG-970 (11-26)
    Chain: PC-951
    Rear Derailleur: SRAM X.9 mid
    Shifter: SRAM X.0
    Bars: Easton Monkeylite DH
    Stem: Thomson X4
    Seatpost: Thomson Elite
    Seat: WTB Speed V
    Pedals: TIME Atac Z

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattP.
    Thanks for the suggestions. The 823 are UST, correct? Therefore I would just need a UST tire, no Stans? And this is generally lighter than a Stans conversion?

    Still up in the air on the fork. I think it's a toss up between keeping the 888, the 66 ATA, or the 66 RC3. Where I ride now doesn't really warrant an 8" fork, and not sure if the DH near SLO does either (posted in the So Cal forum about that).
    Yes, the 823s are ust and fairly light. Lace them up with double butted spokes and you should shed a decent amount of weight. I am actually in the process of lightening my Gran Mal and am lacing 823s with DT Competetion spokes to hopes and my 08 888 WC ATA comes tuesday. If you don't need the 8 inches the 66 ata would be a nice way yo drop some weight but what you have on their is nice too. There have been a ton of ti spring on e-bay lately. Just search for titanium springs on e-bay and you should get some good deals.
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  19. #19
    Rb
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    If you wanna count grams and have the money to do so:

    Cassette: Ultegra or Dura-Ace
    Chain: XTR/Dura-Ace CN-7701

    Keep the Thomson post. Mate it with something like the WTB Pure V SLT. Very comfortable, very light (Ti rails with carbon mold). The SDG I-beam is crap. Sure, you'll save a few grams, but it's durability comes nowhere close to that of a Thomson -- it's just one of those parts you'll NEVER have to worry about. There are better places to shave weight than your seatpost. If you're really set on getting a new post... The Easton EC90 puts the SDG I-beam to shame in terms of durability AND it's carbon composite.

    You have a pretty trick setup... But like I said, at some point, you're going to reach the point of diminished returns and all the money in the world won't lighten your bike that much... Face it, the Blindside is a really heavy single-pivot frame as it is... You either have to accept that, or buy a new frame.

    G'luck.

  20. #20
    eci
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    ti spring
    tubeless wheels (even running ghetto tubeless will save some weight)
    lg1
    sdg ibeam setup(ppl can complain they have broken a seat or two but its a darn good setup)
    Juicy levers to replace your code levers

  21. #21
    Is flexy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rb

    Keep the Thomson post. Mate it with something like the WTB Pure V SLT. Very comfortable, very light (Ti rails with carbon mold). The SDG I-beam is crap.

    G'luck.

    I'll agree 100% on the Thomson. As for the seat... sure its light but I cased a small dub and recovering from an unintentional superman manuver that seat met my taint pretty hard. My nuts hurt and the seat was trash and it wasn't even a very hard impact. A expensive saddle down the tubes from a fairly minor impact. I've been running the devo (the custom diablo/us open ones with the cromo rails not the ti version) road saddle now and its pretty nice.
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  22. #22
    Rb
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    Oh yeah...

    I'd keep the 888. To me, saving a pound by going to the '08 66RC3 isn't worth it.

    Your 888 has Ti springs. It's made in Italy (and was subject to better quality control). RC2X damping is the most advanced Marzocchi has come up with to date (RC3 a deceiving 'upgrade'). Not to mention... no loose 20mm axle, no top crown bumping into your downtube, etc.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by motormonkeyr6
    Ewww! I have one on my 7point, Really uncomfortable, and they have a tendency to break. I know personally 3 people who have broken the Ibeam seats.
    With that build, I doubt he's even sitting on the seat. I do know a guy who broke one casing a big gap. It ripped the rail of the seat off where the post was grabbing it. He just bolted the seat back on in a different place on the beam to finish the ride!

    Try the I sky if you want cush... It's about a 1/4 lb heavier than other I-beam seats though... It's DJ style, but works good on DH as well. That's what I got:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo
    The internet sounds like a tough place to ride.

  24. #24
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    The Atomlab Pimp isn't THAT heavy. I think you're thinking of the Trailpimp.

    LG-1 guide. Ditch the SRAM cassette, grab an Ultegra. Chop off any extra post. Grab a different seat. As mentioned, tubeless. You can pair up Ultimate levers with the Code calipers. If you don't have the new style pads, you can grab the newer style with the aluminum backed pads.

    Wellgo MG-1 pedals are very light. If you don't adjust the seat much, grab a bolt-on.

    If you don't need all that extra stopping power, go to smaller rotors. I think you'll probably be fine going to a smaller rotor in the rear.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rb
    You have a pretty trick setup... But like I said, at some point, you're going to reach the point of diminished returns and all the money in the world won't lighten your bike that much... Face it, the Blindside is a really heavy single-pivot frame as it is... You either have to accept that, or buy a new frame.

    G'luck.
    I completely agree with you. I'm not trying to make my bike the lightest race bike on the block, I'm trying to switch around components to make it a better ride for the trails that I spend 80% of the time on. And at the same time, if I can lighten it up, why not.


  26. #26
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    My Acids are holding up well. There's a bit of plastic in the body, which scared me, but I've beat the crap out of them with no issues. Plus, their bearings are better than any of CBs other clipless pedals (needle bearing instead of plastic bushing on the inside.) You could save a good bit of weight with an 823/ Hope Pro II wheelset. Get a ti railed WTB seat. I like the Rocket V whatever. Marzocchi's springs are fawking heavy. You could save a dencent amount of weight just by getting a Fox steel spring. A ti one would be even better. Ultegra cassette, 185mm rear rotor, a lighter guide, like an LG1 or Gamut would all drop some weight.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rb
    Ask El Gordo. He's 240 lbs and is god of everything Transition...






    ha.

    Yo who called me out... What does 240lb have to do with anything weighed myself this morning 239lb B I T C H*. Do I even know you, anyway........

    WTF I asked this same question and got ripped....... Go ride your bike, blah blah blah is all people said.... Discrimination on El Gordo....

    As for the Atomlab Pimps everybody thinks they are bricks on this site... They are new and weigh 740gr - Mavic 823's 690 gr not including everything else thats needed for the UST.. The new Pimps are not that heavy...

    So Matt go ride your fawking bike.... No really 42 lbs is nice dude, I got mine at 43.4 lbs . I guess if you want to drop the coin go with the 823's you shave some weight there, thomson goodies, you have the 08 Codes right? cause they are lighter... Dont forget you want to add the Floater so your weight is gonna go up a bit aswell.. Maybe a road cassette... For the money I dont think the Ti spring is worth the weight saving but that just my .02. Listen to the God of all Transition
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattP.
    Thanks for the suggestions. The 823 are UST, correct? Therefore I would just need a UST tire, no Stans? And this is generally lighter than a Stans conversion?

    As for the seat, I ran the I-beam system on my Nomad, the saddle didn't bug me. Didn't put it on this bike just cause BTI didn't stock the 30.0. I'll have to go back to that.

    Any recommendations for tires? Right now where I'm riding, same terrain as D'ville. But next fall I'll most likely be moving to SLO, and don't mind picking up better tires for that area, unless you have a suggestion on a good all around tire.

    Still up in the air on the fork. I think it's a toss up between keeping the 888, the 66 ATA, or the 66 RC3. Where I ride now doesn't really warrant an 8" fork, and not sure if the DH near SLO does either (posted in the So Cal forum about that).
    ALWAYS RUN STANS GOO WHEN RUNNING TUBELESS

    yes 823's are tubeless
    run any tire you want ...keep the sizes at 2.25 to 2.5

    i would keep the 888

    btw there are many trails in the SLO area that will use the hell out of your 888
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    ALWAYS RUN STANS GOO WHEN RUNNING TUBELESS

    yes 823's are tubeless
    run any tire you want ...keep the sizes at 2.25 to 2.5

    i would keep the 888

    btw there are many trails in the SLO area that will use the hell out of your 888
    Excellent, I decided that I'll keep the 888

    SMT, what is the advantage to running a UST rim, If you have still have to run Stans? (Excuse my ignorance)

    Thanks to everyone who has put their input into this thread, really appreciate it.
    Things decided I will change:
    Wheelset/Tires
    Seat
    Pedals
    Cassette
    Ti spring (95% sure)

    Thanks guys

  30. #30
    Rb
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Gordo
    WTF I asked this same question and got ripped....... Go ride your bike, blah blah blah is all people said.... Discrimination on El Gordo....
    You sound hurt. Go ride your bike.

    Yo who called me out... What does 240lb have to do with anything weighed myself this morning 239lb B I T C H*. Do I even know you, anyway........
    If that's not ironic, I dunno -- the toilet must be flushing the other way today.

    Nobody called you out. I threw your name out there because you've spent more money on buying new parts for your beloved bikes than Snoop Dogg has on pot. Maybe you could offer your 'expertise' ? Jeez, sorry about the name drop.

    Down a pound? I'm happy for you. I guess that means you'll continue to rave about your money pit because it holds up to a 240....errrr... 239 pound McBiggie in every thread. Darn.

    E-thug alert!

    Relax. You might have a heart attack.

  31. #31
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    One area where a lot of weight might be hiding is the rear bolt-through axle. The bolt-through transitions I have seen came stock with a pretty heavy solid steel axle. I have a turner and it came with a rear axle that is made out of some weird alloy, it's very light and the hex end is hollowed out a bit. I don't hear of anybody bending/breaking these.... something to look into. I bet you could save 200g there easy (.4 lbs) without spending a bunch of money.

    Tubeless is awesome, but shop carefully for tires. I love my michelin comp 24's but they aren't light. Likewise I bet something like the big bettys might be too light and you could suffer a lot of flats? 2.5 LUST high rollers seem like a good balance of weight / durability.

    Ti Spring definitely will save some weight, especially on a long shock.

    Magnesium pedals can save weight if you ride flats.

    I don't think I'd sweat the rest of the stuff. Cassette and seat won't save you any weight and a road cassette will limit the bike to getting pushed uphill. With that frame and a 888, it's going to be bard getting under 40lbs without dropping a lot of cash on parts that won't last IMHO.

    Last year I ran a few miles 1-2x a week, and did some XC trail rides on my 40lb big bike.... 6-8 weeks of that and your bike will feel 10lbs lighter... and you don't have to spend any money!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattP.
    Excellent, I decided that I'll keep the 888

    SMT, what is the advantage to running a UST rim, If you have still have to run Stans? (Excuse my ignorance)
    It ends up being lighter and simpler. The 823 requires the use of special nipples and holders. However, you don't have to use rim strips to space the Stan's strip up to the bead, and blah blah.

    The Goo is just to help seal things up.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    It ends up being lighter and simpler. The 823 requires the use of special nipples and holders. However, you don't have to use rim strips to space the Stan's strip up to the bead, and blah blah.

    The Goo is just to help seal things up.
    Not sure if you know, but it is possible to have an i9 wheelset w/ 823's since they require those special nipples?

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattP.
    Not sure if you know, but it is possible to have an i9 wheelset w/ 823's since they require those special nipples?
    I e-mailed them about a year ago asking the same question and they said no problem. There is an upcharge for the rim, plus a tad more labor for lock-tighting the nipple inserts. Adds $65 making a wheelset about $925.
    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo
    The internet sounds like a tough place to ride.

  35. #35
    Rb
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattP.
    Not sure if you know, but it is possible to have an i9 wheelset w/ 823's since they require those special nipples?
    You're probably best off, emailing/calling I9.



    It's all just a matter of whether or not the head (or is it the tail?) of the I9 spokes will fit inside Mavic's threaded nipple holders.

    I think it'll work....

  36. #36
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    I've got a set of I9's to 823s. Work great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Cliffy
    I e-mailed them about a year ago asking the same question and they said no problem. There is an upcharge for the rim, plus a tad more labor for lock-tighting the nipple inserts. Adds $65 making a wheelset about $925.
    Cool man, I'll have to give them a call Monday!

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    ....185mm rear rotor...
    I think the Blindside rear is 8" minimum....if you go with the Floater.
    Extreme stationary biker.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattP.
    Not sure if you know, but it is possible to have an i9 wheelset w/ 823's since they require those special nipples?

    Yes... i've built a set. it's actually easier to build 823s with the I9 spokes. they turn out very very nice.
    Proud to represent Mojo Wheels.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by geolover
    I think the Blindside rear is 8" minimum....if you go with the Floater.
    Well, he's not running a floater, and it looks like a regular 203mm adapter on the rear end. So I would say that he's good to go for a smaller rotor.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Well, he's not running a floater, and it looks like a regular 203mm adapter on the rear end. So I would say that he's good to go for a smaller rotor.
    That is true. With out the floater, I can ran whatever rotor size I want. I plan on getting a new wheelset, and if I do, I'll get it in 12mm so I can run a floater later down the road if the brake jack really gets to me.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    Well, he's not running a floater, and it looks like a regular 203mm adapter on the rear end. So I would say that he's good to go for a smaller rotor.
    Fair enough...although I thought I read (in the Tranny forum) that the OP will be going floater soon. It could've been someone else, though.

    edit: nevermind....MattP answered it already.
    Extreme stationary biker.

  43. #43
    3 "fiddy" for short
    Reputation: be350ka's Avatar
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    Dec 2004
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    What about using the direct mount stem rather than the X4. I use the direct mount on my 888 and would think that it is lighter. I agree on the brakes. You could lose some weight there. Ti spring for sure. For the wheels I second the 823/Hope setup. I am running 729/Hope on my DH bike and they are holding up fine.

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