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Thread: ladder rungs

  1. #1
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    ladder rungs

    I have seen people using 2x4s for ladder runga and also planks of cedar. Is it going to matter which one you use?

  2. #2
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    I don't advise...

    Quote Originally Posted by washingtonian
    I have seen people using 2x4s for ladder runga and also planks of cedar. Is it going to matter which one you use?
    using 2x4's. They get slick as snot after mud, rain, snow, general use & weather have had their way with them. Unless you live where it's dry. split wood provides waaaaay better traction and, if made properly, lasts considerably longer. And rungs made from down trees and such is free!

  3. #3
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    treated 2x4's can also relese chemicals into the dirts

  4. #4
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    We find the best material is an old cedar log that's been laying on the ground for 40 years. Split up with a froe, we can basically cut any dimension we need. Lots of grip, very strong, and lasts forever.

    We were able to split perfect 2x10's over 4' long with this method to build the walls.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by davet
    We find the best material is an old cedar log that's been laying on the ground for 40 years. Split up with a froe, we can basically cut any dimension we need. Lots of grip, very strong, and lasts forever.

    We were able to split perfect 2x10's over 4' long with this method to build the walls.

    That is some sweet wall rides there.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by davet
    We find the best material is an old cedar log that's been laying on the ground for 40 years. Split up with a froe, we can basically cut any dimension we need. Lots of grip, very strong, and lasts forever.

    We were able to split perfect 2x10's over 4' long with this method to build the walls.

    I am guessing that this is gonna sound really dumb to you, but here goes. Aren't most logs rotten after 40 years of sitting on the ground? Or does Cedar have some special properties that it actually ages/dries out? Any other suggestions for types of trees to use? Most deciduous stuff on the ground in the forest is already rotten and not usable for anything structural within a couple of years.
    To air is human, to dig is divine.

  7. #7
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    yellow cedar

    is the choice if you can find it, on the norshore. Yes it lasts and doesn't rot like deciduous trees. Think about it: cedar decks fences roof shhingles...it's used for a reason.

    Jim

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    ......... Think about it: cedar decks fences roof shhingles...it's used for a reason.

    Jim
    i heard it was because it smelled good........


    simple 1x's work well too......
    Last edited by .WestCoastHucker.; 01-23-2007 at 10:01 AM.


  9. #9
    Justin Vander Pol
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    Quote Originally Posted by davet
    We find the best material is an old cedar log that's been laying on the ground for 40 years. Split up with a froe, we can basically cut any dimension we need. Lots of grip, very strong, and lasts forever.

    We were able to split perfect 2x10's over 4' long with this method to build the walls.
    That's some great looking planking. What's a froe and how did you make those 2x's? I've got a few projects where I could definitely use some sweet lumber like that.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by juice
    That's some great looking planking. What's a froe and how did you make those 2x's? I've got a few projects where I could definitely use some sweet lumber like that.


    That's a froe.

  11. #11
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    No...

    THAT is a fro
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  12. #12
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    you can also put shingle on 2x4's if you're worried about them slicking up, and don't have yellow cedar, woodcutting skills, or a froe
    "Don't just huck yourself: be skilled, be trained, be ready, be prepared, then give 'er." -Dylan Tremblay

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker.
    i heard it was because it smelled good.........
    Also good for cedar-plank salmon.... mmmmm..


  14. #14
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    also keep in mind

    that wood that is up off of the ground is less subject to the effects of rot and weathering. This is mostly because it doesn't stay wet up there, no ground next to it to trap moisture, more airflow to help it dry, which also cures it more. Though you will find most lumber you buy in lumber yards, especially the cheap stuff is designed for interior, dry application, never meant to be exposed to elements for long. The biggest problem you will find is going to be dry-rotting, insect damage and warping. On the other hand, if you wanna spring the money for hard wood or cedar lumber, go for it.

    Another thing to consider, for those in areas that are predominately deciduous forests, is look for some newer fallen logs of a size you feel you can use, and get em up off the ground, let em dry out. Hardwoods are your best bet, like oak. Once you get it dry, which depending on the size of the log could take between a couple months and a year or more, you can cut it how you want it and set it up. If at all possible, protect where the structure contacts the ground, perhaps by placeing some tar on the wood. You could also have where the ramp leads on/off set on some stone, that will not hold as much moisture and lead to rot.

    I realize that the above process would be a lot more legnthy, it would yield good long term results. If you are going to use lumber yard materials, just realize, you will probably have to do a fair amount of replacement maintenance, in increasing amounts within a year or two and beyond.

    Another option for finding good usable wood in areas without cedar or much of it, talk to people associated with tree industries, or part botanists or naturalists in your area. Ask about what local wood types are good at resisting rot and stay hard over time. You don't neccessarily have to tell them what you are asking for, as some individuals may get all uppity about the subject if they personally disagree with your goals.

    Just my 2 pennies on it all...

    Nyte

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by davet


    That's a froe.
    so do you use the froe by itself or would you recommend having a hammer or something to hit it with too?

  16. #16
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by flyingwalrus
    you can also put shingle on 2x4's if you're worried about them slicking up, and don't have yellow cedar, woodcutting skills, or a froe
    You mean RED cedar right!Yellow cedar is worth almost as much as gold. I live near a cedar mill where you can get mill end 2X4's,2X6's,or pretty near any size of dimensional lumber.Sometimes it's free and other times you might have to pay $10 a truck load.Any way you look at it it's cheap especially when you consider that rough cedar goes for over a thousand per thousand.And yeah,cedar lasts for years without rotting.Theres no need to treat it to get it to last.
    Dave

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt
    so do you use the froe by itself or would you recommend having a hammer or something to hit it with too?
    That mallet next to the froe is there to throw you off. You don't even USE the froe, you just have to own one. Then little ladder-gnomes steal into your trail in the dead of night and construct ladders for you, as you are holder of the mighty froe.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Archdukeferdinand
    That mallet next to the froe is there to throw you off. You don't even USE the froe, you just have to own one. Then little ladder-gnomes steal into your trail in the dead of night and construct ladders for you, as you are holder of the mighty froe.
    Good enough to make my sig. Frist zeed, and now me....your on a roll man.

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