kingfisher pros cons- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    kingfisher pros cons

    this would be my first dh bike. my thought was a single pivot would be less maintenince. i found a 07 stock , hes asking 950. is it a good design for a single?

  2. #2
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    high/fwd beam rears are not my fave design by a long shot but for under a grand it might work well for a starter bike. i dig the bonty branded parts and theyll transfer over well if ya get a new frame down the road.

    is it a kf 1 or a 2?
    if its a "like new" kf-1, thats not a bad price i suppose. what condition is it in?
    whats yer weight?
    describe yer ridin style and terrain.
    whats yer goal with this bike?

    all things that will help answer yer question.
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  3. #3
    AKA; Jimmy Tango
    Reputation: gop427's Avatar
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    I own a KF, and I have DH raced on it. However, it is NOT a DH bike. It is a freeride bike. A darn good one too. Reliable, good handling, and tough. For that money, go ahead and buy it. For that price you can get your feet wet and see if you want to pursue DH further.

  4. #4
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    its a kf 2,good condition. i am a clyde at 215, i am just learning to ride dh. the bike would basically be used at highland all the time. i am looking to get a bike so that i dont have to rent

  5. #5
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    its a ok deal for lift work but at yer size youll know all about the flex and bob inherant in that design. the bob wont be much of a issue at highland but the flex will be ever present. its not a bad bike so dont misunderstand. my biggest worry would be gettin replacement frame bits down the road but if yer not plannin a long life together, thats no biggie.
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  6. #6
    sixsixtysix
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    My buddy bought a KF2 as his first real bike and has been on it for over 2 years now. Its a pretty burly bike which is good for someone learning to ride. He has never had a major component fail except for the stock Manitou Stance fork, which should be replaced regardless. Frame does flex some, but with proper maintenance and lots of locktite, it isn't really an issue.

  7. #7
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    The rear dropouts tend to loosen up (bolt on), make sure those are checked regularly and use loc-tite.

    The pivot's will develop slop if not checked regularly as well.

    Otherwise, solid bike.

  8. #8
    ******ed or Branded??
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    I would have to say the least that the bike is ok. Like metioned above it's a great FR bike.

    Make sure to get rid of the stock fork and upgrade to at least a 180mm fork. This is very important. The bike will perform alot better and it gives you that extra HA you will need to help with the DH aspect of riding the bike.

    It will suck badly at the berms and turning at speed due to the super high BB. But great at the turning at slow and techy switchbacks since it's a single crown.

    The bike pedals really well as long as you got the right spring rate and air pressure in the boost valve of the rear shock. Take the extra time to play with this cause it makes a world of a difference.

    Other what already been metioned it's a good bike for that price. But I personally would have to ask to have the price drop down at least a 100 bucks if it's all stock. I had one for about a year and helped me progress my riding. But I finally had to move up from that. I still do ride that bike but not for strict DH. I use it for those gnarly decesends that you need to climb up to.


    If you do get it have fun and get ready to change your out look in MTB.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cactuscorn
    my biggest worry would be gettin replacement frame bits down the road but if yer not plannin a long life together, thats no biggie.
    Actually, I give trek/GF huge props on warranty. Replacement parts shouldn't be too hard to come by, and if trek/GF can't get them, they will probably end up giving you a session 77 or 7 or if they don't have more of those left even a session 88. They're pretty good about their "lifetime warranty" thing - it really holds true only if its original owner, but chances are you'll get a pretty gnar good deal on crash replacement at worst.

  10. #10
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    yep. their warranty is very good but leaves a used bike owner at no advantage really as crash replacement isnt as good as one might expect anymore. they also seem to stop supportin old frame triangles after about 3 to 4 years now. even '06 pivot bits are gettin sorta hard to order. all the kits are about gone so ya end up orderin individual bits at a much higher cost than pre packaged kit form. the times, they are a changin and even the big guys cant afford to keep decades of replacement parts on hand anymore. such is life.

    not to toot my turner horn too much here but a deal on a used square tubed dhr will provide a proper dh rig and a decade or more of parts support in 1 of the best warranty/cs/crash replacement programs in the industry, even 2nd hand frames with a recipt are covered. kinda amazin in this day and age.
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