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  1. #1
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    Jumping technique

    I have no problem taking a low speed wheely drop of a rock or a relativly flat ladder drop....But nothing more than 3 feet max. But for some reason I suck at jumps or any ramps you need to launch with speed. Something about getting luanched into the air that messes with my head. I also tend to land front wheel first way to often.

    Recently a trails guy I was riding with told me that part of my problem was that as I take off from the jump I am pulling up on the handle bars. He recomended that all I need to do is pull backwards towards my chest instead of up. I have not tried this yet, does this sound correct?

  2. #2
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    do not, I repeat, do not jerk on the handle bars to gain airtime. Ride up the lip smoothly and "pump" your legs as go into the lip and then rise up off the lip with the bike, basically bringing the bike with you through the air.

  3. #3
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    im pretty new to all of this as well. I find that when i go off jumps that throw me into the air, i have a tendency to lift the handlbars aswell. A lot of the time it makes me pull them crooked and if i land like this is usually a pretty good crash.

    I think a lot of the problem is not having enough speed going into it. I have been trying to keep my arms straight and jump more with my body (if that makes any sense). I have had more success with this, in that i dont feel i need to pull with my arms to make sure i clear the landing.

    I think as time goes on and you hit more jumps, your going to have a better understanding of how you will need to adjust your bodyweight according to the angle at wich you take off too.

  4. #4
    wretch
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    Im just learning and my biggest lesson thus far has been be careful about the speed. That was my mistake, I thought ok charge it. . . over shot it big time. Each jump requires a little speed knowledge IMO. That's assuming your dealing with lips and trannys. Sounds funny saying that. . . I think crazy jim put it pretty well.

    Arms straight? I duno, doesnt sound too good to me. . . too stiff, gotta be light and relaxed.

  5. #5
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    jumping

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Mailloux
    I have no problem taking a low speed wheely drop of a rock or a relativly flat ladder drop....But nothing more than 3 feet max. But for some reason I suck at jumps or any ramps you need to launch with speed. Something about getting luanched into the air that messes with my head. I also tend to land front wheel first way to often.

    Recently a trails guy I was riding with told me that part of my problem was that as I take off from the jump I am pulling up on the handle bars. He recomended that all I need to do is pull backwards towards my chest instead of up. I have not tried this yet, does this sound correct?
    There are so many variables to jumping....face,speed, angle,bike,etc ,etc....try small and work your way up. watch this http://www.bikeskills.com/videoclips.php scroll down to the jumping video
    Last edited by lj426; 10-09-2008 at 10:24 PM.

  6. #6
    外国人
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    practice on a table top at your local bmx track, it is more forgiving

    i think the best way to describe to "pull up" is to actually push your bike down AND forward when you start to take off

  7. #7
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    A few of us were trying to come up with a simple way to describe the motion you want to have on the takeoff and the easiest description I could come up with is the old swingset method. If you've ever played on a swing and decided to stand up and pump to get more height then you know the motion already. All you end up doing is unweighting the bike so it goes up smoothly (preload, then release). Does that make sense?
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  8. #8
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    build your own jumps and make them table tops....practice, practice practice.slowly start to progress
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  9. #9
    stoneblender
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    Think about how you jump without the bike. The first thing you do is flex lower and then spring up. It's a whole body thing too; ankles, knees, hips, back, shoulders, elbows, wrists, neck and head. You have to get down before you can rise up.

    Work pump track concepts on every trail feature. Bounce all the time when you ride downhill and this load/unload feeling will become second nature. If you're a good skier or snowboarder, then you already know it.

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  10. #10
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    How's this technique? Keep in mind that I am DJing my 40#, plush, Izimu.

    <object width='500' height='440'><param name='allowFullScreen' value='true' /><param name='allowScriptAccess' value='always' /><param name='movie' value='http://www.pinkbike.com/v/41309/l/' /><embed src='http://www.pinkbike.com/v/41309/l/' type='application/x-shockwave-flash' width='500' height='440' allowFullScreen='true' allowScriptAccess=always' /></object>

  11. #11
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by lj426
    There are so many variables to jumping....face,speed, angle,bike,etc ,etc....try small and work your way up. watch this http://www.bikeskills.com/videoclips.php scroll down to the jumping video
    is it just me or are those videos not working?

  12. #12
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    Thats funny i love the weird music and slow mo as you go all wonky

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazy Jim
    do not, I repeat, do not jerk on the handle bars to gain airtime. Ride up the lip smoothly and "pump" your legs as go into the lip and then rise up off the lip with the bike, basically bringing the bike with you through the air.
    i disagree a little,
    if you are hitting a jump for the first time and your not used to it then yes don't pull up the handlebars, just preload the suspension. kind of like your testing your suspension in the parking lot where you jump up and down on the thing and the front and rear both compress. do that up the lip of the jump then unweight the bike as your leaving the lip.

    however
    if you are trying to boost the jump and get some height then you need to learn to pull up on the handlebars correctly.
    go out to a parkinglot and learn to J hop. that is where you pull the front end up and when its in the air you jump the rear up to match (so in other words the only usefull way to bunnyhop). if you practice these and you can land the tires even then you can apply that to jumping to get more height of the lips. just lift the front tire up as its passing the lift and pop the rear off of it after. it takes practice to get this down cause you might pop the front too much and land rear first or pop the rear too much and land nose heavy.

    now while your through the air try to stay centered over your bike. do not lean back especially if its a transition landing. i find it best to stay centered and relaxed with your arms bent and the bike sucked up to you a little and when your about to land you can push the front end down to meet the tranny.

  14. #14
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    yes

    Quote Originally Posted by Metanoia
    practice on a table top at your local bmx track, it is more forgiving

    i think the best way to describe to "pull up" is to actually push your bike down AND forward when you start to take off
    exactly.
    I "push" the front end forward extending my arms a little.
    I guess I compress the fork slightly as well...but just don't think about it. It's natural at this point.

    Just a couple of points:
    Make sure stems are short (not XC length). This will naturally help keep your weight distributed and the front end up without having to yank the bars.

    Practice on the curb first. Push the bike forward until you are landing both wheels at the same time.
    Now try some drops....remember, it's basically the same idea and technique...regardless of the height.

    Then step it up and go bigger...

  15. #15
    Urban Ninja
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Mailloux
    I also tend to land front wheel first way to often.
    Slow down the rebound in the rear shock.

  16. #16
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    Bike settings, too..

    Also overlooked for new jumpers...

    your rebound may be set too 'fast', esp if you had your bike set up for more trail riding. When you say you're landing front first alot, try slowing the rebound in the rear shock...too-fast rebound will definitely send the back end popping up after it leaves the lip...
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  17. #17
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    The best way to learn is watch the pros (or even better ride with guys who's skills are better than yours), try to emulate what they do, then have a friend film you, watch yourself and analyze what you're doing or not doing (you'll be surprised how different something feels like on the bike as compared to how it really looks). I like to just look for feedback while doing it.............take-off, boost, angle of bike, landing, etc. If you notice yourself doing something wrong, experiment til it's better, then do the better technique until it's muscle memory. When you hit a new jump, usually biggger and longer, you tend to revert back to your level of preparation.........your instincts kick in, hopefully you've trained them to do the correct attack. BOTTOM LINE=RIDE MORE
    I like bikes.

  18. #18
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    I've found that a little too much speed is often better than too little speed, keep in mind what kind of jump it is (obviously casing a table or a step up isn't as bad as a big road gap or double).

  19. #19
    Takw/agranofsalt
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    Quote Originally Posted by combatkimura
    How's this technique? Keep in mind that I am DJing my 40#, plush, Izimu.

    <object height="440" width="500">


    <embed src="http://www.pinkbike.com/v/41309/l/" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always'" height="440" width="500"></object>
    Lemme just start by saying where you went wrong off the first jump. No back flip. Then on the next jump I expected a tail whip 360 followed by a bar spin off the next jump, then a no-foot can can off the 3rd jump.........sorry...... Been watching too much slopestyle videos lately.

  20. #20
    dirt rules
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    Try to focus on keeping your arms and legs RELAXED as you hit the lip. If you tighten up, (especially your legs) it will pitch you sideways!

  21. #21
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    Thanks for all the advice everyone

    I built a jump in the back yard today, something very similar to what I encounter on the trails at my favorite spot (8 foot ladder ramp about 36" high at the lip) and spent a couple of hours hitting it. One thing I have noticed it that I over think jumps and drops to much on the trail. And the further away from the truck I am, the higher the stunt appears. So as soon as I was done setting this thing up I got right on my bike and went for it. I didn't give myself any time to psych myself out. I must have hit the thing 30 times today. It was a blast

  22. #22
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  23. #23
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    I pull up on the handlebars when I jump. I find that when I don't, the bike behaves more neutrally or even nose heavy.
    I think if it like this...bunny hop off the ramp. It's kinda the same principle as ollieing off a launch ramp on a skate board.
    You pull up on the handlebars smoothly (don't jerk), and when you leave the ramp, extend your legs. You'd be surprised at how easy the bike is to pitch forward/down in the air to match the angle of the lander ramp. I feel that pitching your bike forward like that is a very similar motion to pitching your bike down off a drop; just extend your arms and bring your legs up. You can also tap the rear brake to bring the front down as well.
    Jump it onto something off of something or over something.

    There's more to freeriding than dirt jumps.

  24. #24
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    Ive got a question about jumping. In alot of the movies I watch when guys do backflips or 360's they stop their rear wheel in the air. Does that help with the momentum of a flip?

  25. #25
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    They use their rear brake if then need to get their front end down.
    I have never done it, but have been warned many times never use your front brake midair.

  26. #26
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    I like to jump with what I call the "Bender Approach" This is basically a technique I learnt spending countless hours watching the 'Man' do it.

    First, findind jumps or drops that are way to big for your ability.

  27. #27
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    I like to jump with what I call the "Bender Approach" This is basically a technique I learnt spending countless hours watching the 'Man' do it.

    First, findind jumps or drops that are way to big for your ability.
    Second, just go for it, skill is not needed, just balls, and lots of big balls. Soon you will figure out what the hell it is you are suppose to do while launching aimlessly through the air.

    After many tries of this, go to an easy jump and you will rock it like a rockstar.

    But truthfully beats the hell out of me, I don't even really ride...I find jumping a curb challenging.

    in fact why I wrote this pointless message is beyond me, and why I will actually post it is even further beyond me, I should just delete it and shut my mouth.

    opps too late

  28. #28
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    Stay seated when you jump and keep your elbows locked, my two cents.

  29. #29
    dirt rules
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtGash
    I like to jump with what I call the "Bender Approach" This is basically a technique I learnt spending countless hours watching the 'Man' do it.

    First, findind jumps or drops that are way to big for your ability.
    Second, just go for it, skill is not needed, just balls, and lots of big balls. Soon you will figure out what the hell it is you are suppose to do while launching aimlessly through the air.

    After many tries of this, go to an easy jump and you will rock it like a rockstar.

    But truthfully beats the hell out of me, I don't even really ride...I find jumping a curb challenging.

    in fact why I wrote this pointless message is beyond me, and why I will actually post it is even further beyond me, I should just delete it and shut my mouth.

    opps too late
    It's ok, lots of no0bs like to hate on Bender. It somehow makes them feel better about their nonexistant abilities on a bicycle.

  30. #30
    Takw/agranofsalt
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtGash
    I like to jump with what I call the "Bender Approach" This is basically a technique I learnt spending countless hours watching the 'Man' do it.

    First, findind jumps or drops that are way to big for your ability.
    So let me ask you, what's your technique for progressing? Finding the same line, the same jump and doing the same thing? How does that help? Just because Bender is filmed pushing his envelope you assume he doesn't know what he's doing? Shame on you.

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