I can't ride w/ seat in up posistion ?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    I can't ride w/ seat in up posistion ?

    If I ride down any decline my seat goes all the way down. Uphill I set the seat all the way up for proper leg extension. If I ride a trail that has a fair amount of up's & down's i'll stop before the technical section and re-adjust. Problem is during a group ride there isn't time to be messing w/ my seat. I ride in a group which mainly consists of XC / trail riders that all leave their seats in the up position. A fellow rider suggested I find a mid position / compromise - I don't feel comfortable going down unless my seat is all the way down. I noticed the XC riders are very rigid and carve the technical sections, myself on the other hand , slice and dice like a BMX'er. Any advice / suggestions. Thanx

  2. #2
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    get one of those hydrolic seatposts that you can adjust remotely on the fly. Only you can be the guinea pig, or prevent forest fires or... nevermind. Or you could just stand up every once and a while. Seat up makes me ride like a ***** so if I had to choose between up all the time and down all the time I'd leave it down.

  3. #3
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    what type of bike are you riding?

    definately have to have it in the up position for teh ride, having it too low for grinds uphill will injure your knees, maybe not now, but in the future. you'll just have to get used to having it up.

    i race XC and DH. while riding XC on my XC bike i leave it up all the time. and my DH bike has it's seat down all the time. when i'm descending on the XC after recently riding the DH bike, it feels weird having the seat up in my crotch, it just takes some getting used to.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironhorsebike1
    what type of bike are you riding?

    definately have to have it in the up position for teh ride, having it too low for grinds uphill will injure your knees, maybe not now, but in the future. you'll just have to get used to having it up.

    i race XC and DH. while riding XC on my XC bike i leave it up all the time. and my DH bike has it's seat down all the time. when i'm descending on the XC after recently riding the DH bike, it feels weird having the seat up in my crotch, it just takes some getting used to.

    I am 6'4" riding an XL Specialized Enduro. I tried riding one day w/ the seat down and my knees were killing me that evening. Not sure if it is my riding style, long torso, bike or what but the seat gets in my way going down. I tried sliding the seat forward on the rails, setting in @ mid height and went down a few trails but I end up trying to get behind my seat and feel trapped for movement back there ???

  5. #5
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    work on your standing up technique...but i i still think u should leave it midway because if your riding DH sometimes then u should be standing and not really in contact with the seat. And with the seat down its hard to get the pinch
    im all about midget drops

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    I am 6'4" riding an XL Specialized Enduro. I tried riding one day w/ the seat down and my knees were killing me that evening. Not sure if it is my riding style, long torso, bike or what but the seat gets in my way going down. I tried sliding the seat forward on the rails, setting in @ mid height and went down a few trails but I end up trying to get behind my seat and feel trapped for movement back there ???
    that is exactly what i was saying. keep it up for the up no matter what.

  7. #7
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    Out of seat

    Try lowering it and when you need to really hammer or climb, just stand up. You would be surprised how much better you will climb up steep, technical sections while standing. If you're climbing seated, you can't move your weight around.

  8. #8
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    Up for the up down for the down. with QR it takes 5 seconds and if you can't catch your crew on the way down with only a five second lead you just need to rally that **** faster.

  9. #9
    395 Fat Tire Council
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobsterCraw
    get one of those hydrolic seatposts that you can adjust remotely on the fly. Only you can be the guinea pig, or prevent forest fires or... nevermind. Or you could just stand up every once and a while. Seat up makes me ride like a ***** so if I had to choose between up all the time and down all the time I'd leave it down.
    http://www.gravitydropper.com/

  10. #10
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    I tried out a Gravity Dropper seat post the other night on my buddies new 6-pack. At first glance, I thought it was the stupidest thing I had ever seen, but after giving it a try, it actually worked really well. It dropped the seat 3 inches with the flick of a lever. Supposedly they are making a 4 inch drop version soon, which I would be more inclined to buy. I would want to run one on my Heckler, for trail riding. It only adds about 100 or so grams over a regular thompson post.
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  11. #11
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    The web page shows the 4 inch.

  12. #12
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    For me?

    I didnt' feel the need to start a new thread since this one is about seats. Excuse me for the language, i do not know the proper terms.

    Im riding, and want to be riding, a lot of trails, ups, downs, small jumps, logs, downhills, that kinda stuff. I was just curious on my height position for my seat. Currently it is at the heigh that im on my tippy toes when i sit on the bike, yet when i read, my knees dont even come anywhere close to being locked. Also i did a hill climb today, standing up, not sure if that is correct or not, but all i know is my right knee is now killing me. Should i have my seat raised higher, and hill climing, should i have been sitting down on this major hill?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chingon
    I tried out a Gravity Dropper seat post the other night on my buddies new 6-pack. At first glance, I thought it was the stupidest thing I had ever seen, but after giving it a try, it actually worked really well. It dropped the seat 3 inches with the flick of a lever. Supposedly they are making a 4 inch drop version soon, which I would be more inclined to buy. I would want to run one on my Heckler, for trail riding. It only adds about 100 or so grams over a regular thompson post.

    I wonder what the distance is from the seat rails to the frame's post mast w/ the Gravity dropper as far down as it will go ? Looks like a good set-up just wonder if it allows for a low enough dropped position.

  14. #14
    ito
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    I'm sorry, if you are having issues decending with a saddle in the up position you need to work on your technique. Learn to get behind the saddle, it isn't hard. If you are riding up and down and constantly changing saddle position you are wasting a ton of time, just get used to the saddle up high. You don't need roadie height, but there is no reason to be slamming the saddle everytime the trail heads downwards. You will also notice that a bike is easier to control when the saddle is touching your legs, you can lean more and have better leverage on the bike.

    I'm hitting stuff on my rigid with the saddle about half an inch lower than full road extension and have never had an issue getting back far enough. Well, there was one time on Tunnel in SB when I took a saddle to the chest, but that was a one time thing.

    The Ito

    P.S. Gino....too low of a saddle position will kill your knees if you are pedalling long distances while seated. Get proper extension, it will help a lot. You should be able to almost get full leg extension on a pedal stroke while seated in the saddle. Being able to touch the ground with tippy toes while on the saddle is bad form.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ito
    P.S. Gino....too low of a saddle position will kill your knees if you are pedalling long distances while seated. Get proper extension, it will help a lot. You should be able to almost get full leg extension on a pedal stroke while seated in the saddle. Being able to touch the ground with tippy toes while on the saddle is bad form.
    Uh oh.. I always thought that was the correct way to have it. Enough for your tippy toes. Looks like i just learnt something new. So i should be able to get almost full leg extension? And this would be good for my riding that im doing? North shore/ Trails, single track, technical stuff? Also about my hill climb, was i doing the correct thing standing up? Or should i have sat down instead, if the seat were higher?

  16. #16
    ito
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    Quote Originally Posted by GinoLicious
    Uh oh.. I always thought that was the correct way to have it. Enough for your tippy toes. Looks like i just learnt something new. So i should be able to get almost full leg extension? And this would be good for my riding that im doing? North shore/ Trails, single track, technical stuff? Also about my hill climb, was i doing the correct thing standing up? Or should i have sat down instead, if the seat were higher?
    If you are riding Northshore style stuff then tippy toes are fine. On pedally trails and fairly technical stuff(that isn't full on DH) a taller saddle position will leave your knees more comfortable. Climbing should be a mixture of standing and sitting if it is an extended climb.
    It also depends on your comfort level. I started out on an XC bike and then moved to DH racing, even on National courses I was running a pretty high saddle because I like to steer with it. I'd say go with what you are comfortable doing, but if you have knee pains it sounds like going higher might help.

    The Ito

  17. #17
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    Higher it is. I have never had seat troubles really. And it is easy to get around your seat. Im more concerened with my knees. North shore isnt often, and i guess i could ride with a high seat on north shore, b/c gernerally standing anyways. Its not like 24/7 north shore, its like normal trail, then lil north shore. I guess higher my seat goes.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    If I ride down any decline my seat goes all the way down. Uphill I set the seat all the way up for proper leg extension. If I ride a trail that has a fair amount of up's & down's i'll stop before the technical section and re-adjust. Problem is during a group ride there isn't time to be messing w/ my seat. I ride in a group which mainly consists of XC / trail riders that all leave their seats in the up position. A fellow rider suggested I find a mid position / compromise - I don't feel comfortable going down unless my seat is all the way down. I noticed the XC riders are very rigid and carve the technical sections, myself on the other hand , slice and dice like a BMX'er. Any advice / suggestions. Thanx
    I am assuming you are riding a more DH bike then your riding buddies. So if the XC'ers are decending with there seat up then you should be able to. You have to stand up though and put your butt behind the seat, don't just sit on your saddle, I'll gauruntee the XC guys don't.

    Have you ever ridden XC before? That's how I started riding and I was doing just as steep of stuff as I do not on an XC hardtail with my seat damn near up to my neck. Jeez kids these days

  19. #19
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    For climbing you should have full leg extension when you pedal sitting down. For the ride down I always drop the seat all the way and for small climbs in between the DH i just stand up if I'm not just pushing the bike.

  20. #20
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    The first couple of years I spent on my mt. bike I had the seat all the way up for proper leg extension, didn't even have a QR seat clamp. After a few bad endo's I decided to get a QR seat clamp and lower my seat on the nastier rock gardens. I felt a lot more comfortable , seat dropped, in any riding situation except climbing. I have been trying to get behind the seat but it restricts my monvement. I have watched plenty of riders negotiate the steeps seated but I feel like an endo / loss of control is one bump away. I have watched a couple younger guys on jumping hardtails run the XC trails and noticed they ride sort of BMX style and do standing climbs, seats dropped the whole time.

  21. #21
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    If u watch the video on the site that sells that automatic seat it is the most wrong thingi have ever seen

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuckMyAge
    If u watch the video on the site that sells that automatic seat it is the most wrong thingi have ever seen
    no kidding. 90 seconds of crotch shots followed by 10 seconds of trail video.
    Divide Bike Bags

  23. #23
    ito
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    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    The first couple of years I spent on my mt. bike I had the seat all the way up for proper leg extension, didn't even have a QR seat clamp. After a few bad endo's I decided to get a QR seat clamp and lower my seat on the nastier rock gardens. I felt a lot more comfortable , seat dropped, in any riding situation except climbing. I have been trying to get behind the seat but it restricts my monvement. I have watched plenty of riders negotiate the steeps seated but I feel like an endo / loss of control is one bump away. I have watched a couple younger guys on jumping hardtails run the XC trails and noticed they ride sort of BMX style and do standing climbs, seats dropped the whole time.
    What is BMX style on a trail ride? I still don't get your slice and dice vs carve styles.

    What it comes down to is what you are comfortable. I'd say either put one of those hite-rite things on your seat post and suffer the ridicule or learn how to ride with your seat in an up or down position all the time. I would think the real answer is if you have that big of a problem with the saddle then you need to run it about halfway or 3/4's extension.

    Really it just sounds like you need to get more comfortable on your bike. Find what works with you now and slowly adjust from there until you find optimul positioning. If it is hard to get behind maybe find a narrower saddle(are you using a DJ saddle?) or move it forward a bit.

    The Ito

  24. #24
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    ok i figure id post here since u guys are talking about seat height

    my seat right now is high enough where my legs are fully extended when i pedal but my feet are like a few inches of the ground is that correct form or is the bike too big, or is the seat to high

    basically is it ok to have your feet of the ground a few inches
    manny gomez

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  25. #25
    TNC
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    Getting behind the saddle.

    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    The first couple of years I spent on my mt. bike I had the seat all the way up for proper leg extension, didn't even have a QR seat clamp. After a few bad endo's I decided to get a QR seat clamp and lower my seat on the nastier rock gardens. I felt a lot more comfortable , seat dropped, in any riding situation except climbing. I have been trying to get behind the seat but it restricts my monvement. I have watched plenty of riders negotiate the steeps seated but I feel like an endo / loss of control is one bump away. I have watched a couple younger guys on jumping hardtails run the XC trails and noticed they ride sort of BMX style and do standing climbs, seats dropped the whole time.
    Keen, your earlier comment on the problem of getting behind your saddle is interesting. I was wondering why this move caused you a problem. I've seen your posts over time, and we've had some good discussions on technical issues, so I could tell that you were not an uninformed newbie, by any means. I'm also one of those riders who rides with a relatively high saddle position on a big hit type bike. Dream4est and I even had a fairly vociferous discussion about the pros and cons of such saddle postitions...LOL!...right, Dream? I'm 53 and surely not as flexible as many of the younger riders on this forum, but I have no problem getting behind my saddle on a nasty drop. To aggravate the situation even further, I have an Azonic Love Seat on a setback Titec Hellbent post, which pushes me further back when I'm off the back. Sometimes I'll even put my gut on the saddle during a drop-in. Here's a pic of my setup, which Dream always loves, LOL, that shows the cockpit layout. All I'm saying is that I'm wondering what might be causing you to have problems in getting off the back of your saddle comfortably to give you the stability you're looking for on steep drop-ins and such, regardless of your saddle height.

    The other guy I work with at the shop is like 6'4" and 45 years old, and his Heckler's saddle height looks like a poster boy for the ultimate World Cup XC bike setup--ultra tall. However, he gets way off the back easily to execute those technical, steep drop-ins. We just got back from Moab, and he never had an endo issue of any kind--and he's no cupcake on his ability to tackle technical, scary terrain. This has been an interesting issue, and it often seems to garner lots of opinions about what works. Clearly there doesn't seem to be "one size fits all" answer to the issue, but it's interesting to see what others do to get their "sweet spot". I also suspect that two types of riding are being represented here. Those who are generally doing stunts, drops, hucks and such are probably much more likely to leave their saddles in the lowered position. Those who are doing rides on their big hit bikes that constantly present elevation changes, like Moab for example, probably leave their saddles in a higher position. I'm sure some riders have situations where they are able to raise their saddles for an extended climb and then lower it permanently for the decent, but depending on trail conditions, that's not always a pleasant option. These new "on the fly" adjustable seatposts may be the best compromise for riders who want constant change in their saddle heights.
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  26. #26
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    I have achieved my proper height for my seat. For all you that think its hard to get behind ur seat going downhill, if i can do it, u all can do it. Today i did it going down a decent size hill. Wasnt difficult at all. Reasonable heigh as well. I also find riding higher gives me better control of my bike. Now as for urban riding, please drop your seats when ur going to do stunts and such. I learnt that the hard way.

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