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  1. #1
    dft
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    hydration pack for lift riding

    i guess i'm still "old school" as i refuse to ride the lifts without a camelback in case of flats unlike the new generation (just seen to many people walking their bikes down).

    anyway, i want to get a smaller pack dedicated to lift riding/shuttles, just big enough for 50-70 oz water and can hold one tube and a small pump.

    this one looks good
    http://www.hydrapak.com/avila/

    people have good experience with other small packs that barely feel like you have on one.

  2. #2
    Come at me bro.
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    i use the 1 from costco. Not bulky. $19.99. 72oz capacity, holds my pump, tube, bike tool set, snacks, spare shirt, and a few misc. items related to biking.

    I don't know how much that one in that link is, but I always chuckle when I meet up w/ my riding buddies and see them with their fancy 70-120$ camelbaks, when a cheap one does the same thing.

  3. #3
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    ^^ cheap ones will fall apart. Camelbaks are more expensive yes, but way more durable. Anyone who pays $70-120 for one is an idiot. You can find them onsale for half price every year

    Example:
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...o+Pack+10.aspx

  4. #4
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    I use a Ogio Baja. Has expansion zippers if you want to put a lot of crap in it..or not.

    Might be bigger than what your thinking. Tuff as hell ( its for dirt bikes but I use it MTB every time too ).

    http://www.amazon.com/Ogio-MX-Baja-H.../dp/B00358PSU6

  5. #5
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    http://www.dakine.com/bike/packs/nomad/

    http://www.dakine.com/bike/packs/drafter/

    http://www.dakine.com/bike/packs/apex/

    Tom I did find an old camelpak Rogue for 10 bucks on Ebay last week....I wanted a smaller pack for everyday short run use...I use a bigger pack like the mule when riding resorts. It holds CO2, sandwiches, cliff bars, sunscreen, tools
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  6. #6
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    Usually pack a Dakine Heli since it does double duty for skiing in the winter:
    http://www.dakine.com/p/ski/packs/guys/heli-pack

    really low profile, and has a flap thing in front that works nicely to hold my ff helmet and pads when not needed.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by drastic. View Post
    I don't know how much that one in that link is, but I always chuckle when I meet up w/ my riding buddies and see them with their fancy 70-120$ camelbaks, when a cheap one does the same thing.
    I always chuckle when i see guys riding DH bikes on 5 minute runs with any backpack...it kinda screams gayper....just sayin
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jurichar View Post
    I always chuckle when i see guys riding DH bikes on 5 minute runs with any backpack...it kinda screams gayper....just sayin
    I always chuckle when I see guys walking out who coulda fixed their tire if they wore a camelback containing tools and spare tubes on those 5 minute DH runs. To each his own I guess.

  9. #9
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    Camelback Hawg. Lots of room.

    I might go "packless" on a cool day but I need to drink constantly in the heat. Also nice to have tools, tubes, etc.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jurichar View Post
    I always chuckle when i see guys riding DH bikes on 5 minute runs with any backpack...it kinda screams gayper....just sayin
    Just sayin,..you're retarded. I don't shuttle or do lifts with a pack anymore, but I know plenty of good riders who ride with one even on short rides.

  11. #11
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    Camelback mule nv. Fairly low profile, as light as you pack it and has a built in rain cover. I like wearing one because it holds my crap and eliminates the need for a bulky spine protector.

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jurichar View Post
    I always chuckle when i see guys riding DH bikes on 5 minute runs with any backpack...it kinda screams gayper....just sayin
    Gondolas get effing hot with body armor on and no windows. I always carry the hydration pack. Your the gaper thats gonna be passed out on the side of the trail.

  13. #13
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    There is a third option: ghetto tubeless with wire-bead Minions. You won't have to carry tubes and you won't be walking out. Hydration and topping off any low tires is handled between runs at the bottom. It is a very liberating setup.

    I was highly resistant to give up the pack as I didn't want to be caught with a flat, but after running the above for an entire season of rock bashing, no one in our group with that combo got ANY flats. I hit a rock at Northstar so hard it bent the rim sidewall on both sides. The tire held air for the rest of the day and I straightened the rim in the hotel room with a C-clamp.

    I put a small kit in my pocket that has a couple zip ties, derailleur hanger, power link, pencil tire gauge (in case you need to use the resort air), and an allen wrench set. If you want to be extra paranoid, you could throw a CO2 inflator in your other pocket to reseat the tire bead of your tubeless setup, but that really isn't even necessary.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini2k05 View Post
    Just sayin,..you're retarded.
    Wow, snappy comeback. What, are you in third grade?

    I got the Dakine Session, btw. Low profile, I think 70oz capacity, has straps on the outside for pads and helmets, Leatt, enough room inside for 2 DH tubes, tools, money, phone etc... It's minimalist, doesn't fly around during aerials, and works great. Did replace the bladder with a Camelback one, though, when the first one wore out.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by coil-n-oil View Post

    If you want to be extra paranoid, you could throw a CO2 inflator in your other pocket to reseat the tire bead of your tubeless setup, but that really isn't even necessary.
    I have found a tube of superglue also helps with problem tubeless flats
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  16. #16
    dft
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    Quote Originally Posted by coil-n-oil View Post
    There is a third option: ghetto tubeless with wire-bead Minions. You won't have to carry tubes and you won't be walking out. Hydration and topping off any low tires is handled between runs at the bottom. It is a very liberating setup.

    I was highly resistant to give up the pack as I didn't want to be caught with a flat, but after running the above for an entire season of rock bashing, no one in our group with that combo got ANY flats. I hit a rock at Northstar so hard it bent the rim sidewall on both sides. The tire held air for the rest of the day and I straightened the rim in the hotel room with a C-clamp.

    I put a small kit in my pocket that has a couple zip ties, derailleur hanger, power link, pencil tire gauge (in case you need to use the resort air), and an allen wrench set. If you want to be extra paranoid, you could throw a CO2 inflator in your other pocket to reseat the tire bead of your tubeless setup, but that really isn't even necessary.
    i run tubless but still get a rare occasional flat (btw, i'd take 823s with ust tires anyday over ghetto). a small camelback i don't even notice it.

  17. #17
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    Dakine Nomad.
    Love the pack, favorite by far to date although to be honest I'm not too keen on the bladder. Thinking of getting one of the new camelbak antidote bladders for a retro-fit.

    michael

  18. #18
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    I gotta second the CamelBak option. Yes its expensive, but worth it because there's plenty of water while I'm riding, and plenty of room for all the stuff one wants/needs as far as repair and food, all without being uber bulky.

    I wore a CamelBak all through the Iraq invasion of 2003, then used the same CamelBak throughout all my training from the time I got back from that, through my next Iraq deployment 2005. I did have to replace the tube somewhere in the middle of all of that, just because it got nasty.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swell Guy View Post
    Wow, snappy comeback. What, are you in third grade?
    20th grade thank you very much.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini2k05 View Post
    Just sayin,..you're retarded. I don't shuttle or do lifts with a pack anymore, but I know plenty of good riders who ride with one even on short rides.
    I guess I'm one of those "good riders." If you want to go minimalist, and you don't need the water (e.g. they have water on the lift), you could always get one of those under-seat toolkits with a tube in case you break down. Beats relying on your buds, the kindness of strangers, or walking out when you blow a tire.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by drastic. View Post

    I don't know how much that one in that link is, but I always chuckle when I meet up w/ my riding buddies and see them with their fancy 70-120$ camelbaks, when a cheap one does the same thing.
    ive had my camelbak blue wave since graduating basic military training.....in 2005.

    still in perfect shape to this day and still using it. only upgrading now because i need room for tools, snack, tube, phone, etc.

    there is a reason for the initial cost...kind of like buying a proper mountain bike.

    ps. jenson has camelbak capo's on sale for $50. absolute steal right now
    Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe 29er

  22. #22
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    It depends on how hot it is for me. I do a lot of trail riding and grabbing for the bite valve becomes second nature and I reach for it when it isn't there. Like driving an automatic when you are used to a manual. I like having gear and water, I don't like sitting on a chair without it, makes the bench seem really narrow when you are 100ft off the ground on a high speed quad.

    Would the people at Whistler please put the damn drinking fountain in a better place, like earlier in line so you don't have to get out of line and try to save your spot when you are on deck...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by thrasher_s View Post
    It depends on how hot it is for me. I do a lot of trail riding and grabbing for the bite valve becomes second nature and I reach for it when it isn't there. Like driving an automatic when you are used to a manual. I like having gear and water, I don't like sitting on a chair without it, makes the bench seem really narrow when you are 100ft off the ground on a high speed quad.

    Would the people at Whistler please put the damn drinking fountain in a better place, like earlier in line so you don't have to get out of line and try to save your spot when you are on deck...
    you can walk straight into GBB and grab some cold water on tap from there right when you get down the bottom...no line up there OR you could also drink at the top before riding down at the back of the first aid headquarter ...

    Camel Back and lift riding makes no sense to me at all...it throws your balance off , looks silly ,adds extra weight to carry, most of the them arent even compatible with neck braces, they're super hot and the only tool you really need to get off the hill are allen keys...I got down the mountain hundreds of times on a flat tire ( before switching to tubeless long ago) and quite frankly its just as long to slowly get to the bottom than putting a new tube in there...and if you're afraid to dent your rim you could always have a couple of tube stashes spread out over the hill.

  24. #24
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    I always use hydration pack when riding, even when lift riding. Small pack is very useful for carrying wallet, keys, mobile phone, energy bar etc safely. And yes, gondoles tend to get very hot on summer, so carrying some water along is not silly at all when doing lift assisted riding. For me it feels odd if I ride without minipump, spare tube, some chain links and multitool... just in case

    My vote for Camelbak Lobo 2011.

  25. #25
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    if i'm solo i always wear a pack. if i'm with a buddy we usually put it all into one pack and i go packless, but all my stuff is there... so in a way im never without a pack... its a basic camelback with 2 pockets, 1 for food and big tools (pump, depending on what bikes are there, wrenches and stuff) and the smaller pocket for my tube and parktool...

  26. #26
    Yes, that's fonetic
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuumbaq View Post
    looks silly .
    Glad I'm one who doesn't GAF what others think. You should try it. Different strokes.....

  27. #27
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    This has been a very good thread. I wear a camelback (contains the essentials hydration, tools, etc etc) I like that it also provides some back protection. But because its got so much room. I end up carrying lots of extras and it makes the pack heavy. I am going to look for something more compact (and try to carry less). Thanks for all the ideas!

  28. #28
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    I wear the Fox Oasis pack and really like it. It has alot of room for stuff but it isn't bulky when i have tube pump and tools. I like to hear people rip on us who wear packs on the DH runs and then go ride and have at least 2 riders a day ask if I have tools or a tube. (But then again i guess the joke could be on me lol)

  29. #29
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    When I'm at the resorts riding, I'm there to have fun, not to have the absolute fastest time down the hill, so the little bit extra weight is inconsequential. I like knowing I can fix most any problems I have on the way down, or adjust my seat, bars, break levers etcetera. Having water always available is a great benefit for me. Additionally, the pack has protected my spine more then a few times after going over the bars.

    Camelback Lobo is perfect. It has 2 zippered pockets and an external pocket. I keep cell phone, wallet, cliff bar, and keys in the bottom one, and I keep a patch kit (when I'm not running tubeless), tire levers, micro pump, and mini tool in the top. A tube and/or windbreaker will fit in the bottom external pocket when needed.

    It will hold 100oz but I usually don't fill it full. It has compression straps so you can tighten everything up if you don't fill it full.
    Last edited by JasonCz; 08-09-2011 at 11:35 AM.

  30. #30
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    I wear a pack on lift rides as well. I usually want to maximize my time riding so I plan to drink and eat snacks on the lift since the car / condo is usually far from the lift anyway. It also backs up as back armor and has saved my a$$ more than once. True they are not needed on 5 min DH runs if things go well all day but it's that one day when they don't that makes them worth having. To me it's no different than the color of jersey that someone has on. Why care about what some guy you donít know is wearing, (which almost sounds like girls worrying about what another girl is wearing, no offence ladies) just worry about yourself.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by whodaphuck View Post
    Glad I'm one who doesn't GAF what others think. You should try it. Different strokes.....
    So...following your reasoning here and you're saying you'd be glad to rock a full skinsuit if you were to race then right ?

    Looking silly is ONE thing Ive said out of 5 reasons I gave why they dont belong to lift riding and Im sure I could come up with more...

    Glad you like your backpack buddy, may I ask you if you also wear it walking down the streets as well...You know, in case you cant get to a tap or something

  32. #32
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    Camelbak Mule here. Perfect for riding DH.

  33. #33
    Yes, that's fonetic
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuumbaq View Post
    So...following your reasoning here and you're saying you'd be glad to rock a full skinsuit if you were to race then right ?

    Looking silly is ONE thing Ive said out of 5 reasons I gave why they dont belong to lift riding and Im sure I could come up with more...

    Glad you like your backpack buddy, may I ask you if you also wear it walking down the streets as well...You know, in case you cant get to a tap or something
    So your opinion that "they don't belong to lift riding" makes it so?
    You are full of yourself, aren't you?
    Also, I can't for the life of me figure out your interpretation of my reasoning that leads me to a skin suit because I use a hydration pack while lift riding.
    Last edited by whoda*huck; 08-09-2011 at 09:13 PM.

  34. #34
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    The best pack is the one you can get your buddy to carry.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by miqu View Post
    I always use hydration pack when riding, even when lift riding. Small pack is very useful for carrying wallet, keys, mobile phone, energy bar etc safely. And yes, gondoles tend to get very hot on summer, so carrying some water along is not silly at all when doing lift assisted riding. For me it feels odd if I ride without minipump, spare tube, some chain links and multitool... just in case

    My vote for Camelbak Lobo 2011.
    2nd that!
    That's a nice smallish pack, 100 oz. too!
    Capable of carrying quite a bit of gear/tools/food/etc.

  36. #36
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    I use a Lobo too. Glad I had mine 2 weeks ago when I got that flat at Snowshoe. New tube and back on the trail a few mins later. Being able to get a drink when you need it, is pretty damn convenient. Not very hot, and the weight is pretty minimal if you only fill it up a bit.

    No idea how ppl think that using a pack looks strange or gay. Pretty damn common everywhere I go.
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  37. #37
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    To each their own. I like having a pack most times, only on shorter shuttle runs do I leave it at the bottom.

    Whatever pack you chose, do get a Camelbak bladder (the kind with a lock valve in addition to the bite valve). The Camelbak bladders rock. (That kinda implies buying a Camelbak pack once you're at it...they are great and you get what you pay for).

  38. #38
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    i used to wear a pack....but if you wear armor too its a major PITA.
    now I stash a jug of gatorade at the lift (or some resorts have a cooler full of water)
    and use a seat bag to hold tube and inflator. actually i dont bother with the tube and inflator anymore. I keep plenty of air in my tires and have never flatted on DH runs.
    The mountains are calling and I must go

  39. #39
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    you guys should look into the platypus hoser... i am new rider and also a backpacker and have used this setup (the bladder) for a long time... and you can put anything in these bladders (i usually put gatorade as water alone does not cut it for me sometimes - i tend to sweat a lot even when going down ) and then you can put them in any type of backpack you want...

  40. #40
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    At Diablo you have one lift and its a focal point for drinks and mechanical fixes, At Snowshoe they have two lifts and a shuttle and there is not a focal point and not too many chances to take a drink or fix a bike.
    These are just 2 examples of east coast resorts where at one you can ride without a pack and you need one at the other.
    You can yell gayfer all you want.....and I'll still throat punch you!

  41. #41
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    I'm thirsty!

  42. #42
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    got my camelbak capo pack. EXCELLENT pack. tons of room for tools/snacks and 3L bag. also holds helmet if needed. not bulky though.

    on sale at jenson too
    Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe 29er

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