How to measure drops?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How to measure drops?

    This isn't a big drop but how do you measure it?
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  2. #2
    Uhhhhh...
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    If i put it in my Pinkbike calculator its around about 52.89345654264527ft but in reality its probably 5ft drop. But who cares?

    -TS
    Fayetteville, AR and N.W.A RePrEsEnT

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSherpa
    If i put it in my Pinkbike calculator its around about 52.89345654264527ft but in reality its probably 5ft drop. But who cares?

    -TS
    Need it be said? Yes, I feel it does...

    Obviously he cares otherwise he wouldn't be asking. Knowing how far you drop is good when trying to progress in systematic fashion. An example: You do a 5 foot drop enough times that you get comfortable enough with it that you can now move up to 6 feet and get comfortable with that, so on and so forth. Also, you've never been slightly curious how far you can jump on a bike? The only true way of knowing is to measure the distance. Sheesh! I notice alot of people shunning measurements like it's the sign of the devil. Competition can be a good thing, especially when you are in competition with yourself. Although, I think the shunning of measurements has more to do with someone saying something along the lines of, "measurements are ghey because it contradicts the true meaning of freeride," and someone else picking that up and using it as their own philosophy until it gets picked up by the masses and becomes a trend on these forums. Furthermore, to say anything contrary to the prescribed belief is sacrilege.

  4. #4
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    Bust out those Trig skills!!!!
    Tony
    is making a comeback.

    Turns out that five years of not mountain biking, really makes one strive to get back to it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by X-Vert
    This isn't a big drop but how do you measure it?
    measure the vertical plane from the top of the approach and the top-most part of the landing.

    if i had to guess, based on the bike size. this one looks to be about a 3-4 footer. although if you jump out farther, you could land over 4 feet down, but the drop face is still only about 3-4 feet

    (edit: upon a second look, i wouldn't even call this a drop, its a steep roll in.)


  6. #6
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    There are 2 main schools of thought

    The first school of thought is "how big did you go" -- measured from where you took off to where your rear tire touched down.

    The second school of thought is "what's the smallest you could have gone" -- measured from where you took off to the nearest spot your rear wheel could have landed.

    For near-vertical drops, it makes sense to just give the vertical distance (as is the case with your pic, and step-ups and step-downs). For near-horizontal jumps, it makes sense to just give the horizontal distance (eg tabletops, some dirt jumps and some road gaps). If you want to cover all your bases, give how much vert and how much horizontal.

    By the first school, I'd call the drop about 3 feet, because it looks like that's how far your rear wheel dropped. By the second school, it's 0 feet because it can be ridden as a steep roll-down.

  7. #7
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    It's been a long long time since I've done any math.

    cos(A) X B = base (the length you jumped)

    sin(A) X B = height (how far you dropped)

    Where A equals the angle and B equals the length of the hypotenuse. The hypotenuse is the length of where you jump to where you land. If you don't get what I'm saying just ask and I'll try to explain further.

  8. #8
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    Sooo...

    ...a "drop" is measured by a combination of horizontal and vertical lengths? I thought a drop is the net vertical measurement of the take off point to the actual point of landing. I know by the comments of the riders with me that they include the length in their measurement.

    Example if my posted pic was a drop to flat, the net vertical measurement would be the same 3-4 foot range. Seems by "Pink Bike" method, most drops to tranny seem be bigger because the tranny would take off much of the impact. So when someone states a 20 foot drop to tranny, a 20 foot drop to flat would be more difficult for the same net drop.

    Thanks for the input.I know it's not huge by any stretch of the imagination but as mentioned earlier, I'd like a guide to build progression on. I'll try to go faster next time and hit the tranny lower.

  9. #9
    Jm.
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    Quote Originally Posted by X-Vert
    This isn't a big drop but how do you measure it?
    congratulations on your 3.7 foot drop.
    I know in my heart that Ellsworth bikes are more durable by as much as double. AND they are all lighter...Tony Ellsworth

  10. #10
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    See, that's the thing....the seemingly logical way to measure a drop is to take the vertical distance, but is that the best measure? Why measure at all...to somehow quantify the difficulty (or 'sickness', if you will) of the drop? Using vertical distance doesn't make much sense, as you've stated, because the tranny plays such a huge factor. Given the right conditions, you could do a 20 foot vertical drop with your tires never being more than a few feet off the ground, and you can touch down with relative ease...almost like an airplane, except on a steep angle. I wouldn't call that a very difficult drop, and it would be pretty lame to try to pass it off as a 20 footer.

    Anyway, the point of all my rambling is that I don't think there's much reason to quantify drops, isn't one number that will give an accurate reflection of what was actually done (even if you created some formula, who cares?). Just post the pics, everyone will appreciate them, and the forum will be better off for it.

    Shibby

  11. #11
    VIA
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    Quote Originally Posted by X-Vert
    This isn't a big drop but how do you measure it?
    To me looks like you're rolling the drop...try it full speed and there you'll have some drop...

  12. #12
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    New question here. drops should be measured like waves

    related to body lengths seems most reasonable,
    let's borrow from another freeriding sport:

    Knee to waist high dribbles,
    shoulder to head high carveable faces
    overhead and spitting .

    you see the first measurement is an idea of the scale of the drop and the subsequent description indicates intesity, steepness, etc.

    I know it is not as analytic as a formula but it makes for better chatter at the end of the ride:
    What would you rather say to you buddies in the parking lot
    "that was a most fun 6.35 ft drop with a 60 degree transitional convex shape" or
    "did you see us rip that overhead a drop with that hairy almost vert section!'

    Some people would rather say neither....

  13. #13
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    how to measure drop...for me

    Quote Originally Posted by X-Vert
    This isn't a big drop but how do you measure it?
    there is no single number to measure a drop IMO. that drop to me looks like a 5ft drop into a 6ft tranny.
    So if you dropped say a pebble off a steep section(drop) where it hits "is" the drop distance.
    Now with bikes you have speed which throws off the concept of a "drop", thats where i throw in "tranny".
    Say you do a 1 ft drop and land 15 ft down the tranny, your in theory still only"dropping 1ft" but with velocity, throwing distance in the equation thus "tranny". the definition of drop is not in horizontal distance but vertical.
    I like my method cuz it to me is accurate and gives you a visual picture to envision.
    Looks like a fun drop. cheers

  14. #14
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    Simple concept...

    It's called Bender Tax and you have to add that on (and that's how far down the tranny you land) to get the final total. That drop is a 6 footer.

    Hey X-Vert, is that out at Lime RIdge? Kinda looks like it.
    Dude. Seriously. I'm freakin out man.

  15. #15
    a'buh?
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    just do all your drops to flat, and then we won't have this problem

    seriously though, I personally measure it as the vertical distance from the lip to wherever my back tire landed on the tranny...but just guestimate and have fun

  16. #16
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    that's some good camera work and excellent photoshop :D

    heh heh... can't wait to go back! You are correct Mr. Mackie. You going to Sandhill for the night race on the 19th? Last time I saw you was last year's race. Still have that white v10? Let's ride some WC urban. You're not too far away, right?

    -East Bay Rich (all polished bullit)
    : )

  17. #17
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    Yup, yup...

    Quote Originally Posted by MrMackie12
    It's called Bender Tax and you have to add that on (and that's how far down the tranny you land) to get the final total. That drop is a 6 footer.

    Hey X-Vert, is that out at Lime RIdge? Kinda looks like it.
    ...Lime Ridge alright!

  18. #18
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    Looking in background of that picture... wow, there could be some nice size ledges for you to work up to
    "Better safe than scarry"

    www.3dmtb.net

  19. #19
    BJ-
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    u guys are so harsh...nice work buddy...hit it with some speed and itll be sick...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob
    everybody was dressed nice...I had shorts, Rogue T-shirt and sandles

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMackie12
    It's called Bender Tax and you have to add that on (and that's how far down the tranny you land) to get the final total..................
    WRONG.

    by that logic, when i haul a$$ and overshoot a 20 foot double by 10 feet, i did a 30 foot double??? no, the double was still a 20 footer......

    although i could fly 30 feet of this drop, it is still only 7-8 feet down.



    (EDIT: anyway, who really gives a rats a$$, go ride and have fun. i think this (how to measure a drop) is something that will never be agreed upon.)
    Last edited by .WestCoastHucker.; 01-23-2007 at 10:03 AM.


  21. #21
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    I'm not worthy...

    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker.
    WRONG.

    by that logic, when i haul a$$ and overshoot a 20 foot double by 10 feet, i did a 30 foot double??? no, the double was still a 20 footer......

    although i could fly 30 feet of this drop, it is still only 7-8 feet down.



    (EDIT: anyway, who really gives a rats a$$, go ride and have fun. i think this (how to measure a drop) is something that will never be agreed upon.)
    ...of this forum! Maybe I'll head back to XC site!

    For Sale 03' Big Hit Expert. Great condition. Never hucked more than 3.7 feet (verified).
    $1,500 or trade for sub 23 lb titanium hardtail, carbon bar ends, bottle of shaving cream and razor.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by X-Vert
    ................For Sale 03' Big Hit Expert. Great condition. Never hucked more than 3.7 feet (verified)....................
    Hahahaha.... so effing funny!!!!!!!!!!!


  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker.
    Hahahaha.... so effing funny!!!!!!!!!!!
    As long as he's using his PinkBike calculater, that bike has yet to leave the shop.
    Tony
    is making a comeback.

    Turns out that five years of not mountain biking, really makes one strive to get back to it.

  24. #24
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    heh heh heh

    Quote Originally Posted by COmtbiker12
    As long as he's using his PinkBike calculater, that bike has yet to leave the shop.
    BWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA HAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAH !
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    To feel no fear denotes a lack of intellegence.
    True courage is feeling the fear and doing it anyway.

  25. #25
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    Pinkbike calculator?

  26. #26
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    [QUOTE=.WestCoastHucker.]WRONG.

    by that logic, when i haul a$$ and overshoot a 20 foot double by 10 feet, i did a 30 foot double??? no, the double was still a 20 footer......

    although i could fly 30 feet of this drop, it is still only 7-8 feet down.



    Tru Dat
    If your going downhill real fast and bunnyhop is it a 20 foot drop.
    I've got a solution stop doing drops only do stair gaps and huge jib manuevers.

  27. #27
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    By looking at the picture and assuming the rider is 6' tall, it apears that if he were to stand at the position the rear tire is making contact his head would be about even with the horizontal plane of the take off.
    So taking this into account, if someone asked about the picture, I would say he was out bike riding.

  28. #28
    Bighit Evangalest
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    or eating tofu.... the 2 are easily confused....
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    To feel no fear denotes a lack of intellegence.
    True courage is feeling the fear and doing it anyway.

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