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  1. #1
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    hockey gear for protection?

    Would using hockey knee/shin guards, and elbow guards be a good idea to use for protection when jumping or riding DH? i thought simply because it's easier to get access to, and if it can stop a solid rubber chunk from breaking your shin, flying at you at 100km/h, it should do the job...

  2. #2
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    im thinking limited mobility and bulkyness....but giver and tell us what you think

  3. #3
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    Hockey shin pads would be too long. They come pretty far down your ankle, so I'd have to imagine that they'd interfere with pedaling a bit. Elbow pads might work OK.

  4. #4
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    depending on your hockey shinn pads they may or may not be too long.
    I play D and like my pads to droop over the skate tounge, and I don't tape them below the calf to maintain mobility. My guess is this would not be pedaling friendly as you're not likely going to wear hockey sock to keep the bottom of teh shinn pad in place. If you wear yours up higher like most fowards, you're gonna be fine.
    Bulk, weight and heat are going to work against you.
    Depending on what you've got for shinn and elbow pads, mobility may or may not be good. My hockey gear was selected for mobility, and is every bit as free to movment as bike gear.

    If you have to purchase gear either way, go with the bike gear, for the price you'll get a more suitable product...less bulk, less weight, ventilation, mobility regardless of modle selected... and in many cases cheaper.

  5. #5
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    http://www.sportchek.ca/sportchek/do...&styleId=30030

    i don't think elbow pads get cheaper than that

    anyone know good cheap shin/knee guards?

  6. #6
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    dang... those look very much like my old Jofa's... and they were 70bux back in the day...
    cripe hockey gear has come way down in price...

    man, shin pads have changed since I last bought... only ones I could find that I like were refere specific gear.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Mike H.; 10-11-2006 at 04:51 PM.

  7. #7
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    No way in HELL would I use my Hockey Shin Guards for Biking, reasons why:

    1. They Fit Loose (Almost all do) Hockey Socks are meant to hold them in place...even with the socks, I tape the straps of the shin pads down to prevent any shifting, then I put socks over....

    2. They're bulky: These things are designed to protect your entire leg from a puck going like 80 MPH....they're pretty big and bulky, not reccomended for biking.

    Yeah, I'd NEVER use them, besides, my RBK 6K's ar elike, 70 bucks.
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  8. #8
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    The mobility should be O.K. The elbow pads will work. Unless the shin pads are very long they will work too.

  9. #9
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    I think a 13" or junior shin pad would work

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by attomixt
    I think a 13" or junior shin pad would work
    that would work....if you could fit into a junior size!

  11. #11
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    lol I would never even think about wearing shin pads.... elbow pads could work if you had smaller ones... I would like to see someone wearing the helmet and cage biking, that would be hilarity...

    I wouldnt laugh at you for wearing hockey elbow pads, but if you wore the shin pads I'd kick you in the nuts.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by free rider
    that would work....if you could fit into a junior size!
    Yeah, but then your legs would not only be skinny enough to fit into a Jr., but they'd be shorter too, so you'd just be back to where you started with the pads being too long.

  13. #13
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    i see a guy (bike messenger) in downtown chicago all the time with full hockey gear, including a goalies mask... in the winter he's got LED light perf'd all thru it so he can be seen in the failing light... I'm betting he's had a car incident and lived to tell about it... I wouldn't do it personally... kinda funny to tell the truth
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by free rider
    im thinking limited mobility and bulkyness....but giver and tell us what you think
    it would work in a pinch but what he said
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  15. #15
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    so... i should prolly go for real shin/knee pads, but elbow hockey pads would be ok. thank sguys

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    Yeah, but then your legs would not only be skinny enough to fit into a Jr., but they'd be shorter too, so you'd just be back to where you started with the pads being too long.
    is that how it works?

  17. #17
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    My friend wore Hockey gloves once just for a joke. That looked funny. He couldnt shift for crap. I'd imagine it would be a bit more difficult to ride with Hockey pads rather than Biking pads.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    lol I would never even think about wearing shin pads.... elbow pads could work if you had smaller ones... I would like to see someone wearing the helmet and cage biking, that would be hilarity...

    I wouldnt laugh at you for wearing hockey elbow pads, but if you wore the shin pads I'd kick you in the nuts.
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  19. #19
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    I would think that a salomn skiers pads are a closer fit but way more money.

  20. #20
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    You're getting a lot of whacko advice from people who've never actually used hockey armor for biking. It may sound odd, but hockey gear is very economical protection. Both knee/shin and elbow/forearm guards are more substantial and are compatible with biking depending on the brand. Even the shoulder pads are built better, have better shoulder suspension and even clavicle guards. The only downside - and it's marginal - is the ventilation is not quite as good.

    Only reason I sold my Easton stuff was because I landed a sponsorship a while back.
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  21. #21
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  22. #22
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    I wouldn't use my leg pads or hip pads cause they're too bulky. Now I use my elbow guards though. I have a pair of Eastons that I got for probably $30-40 and the few times I've crashed with them on, I haven't felt a thing in my ellbows. I still have great mobility to move, which is good.
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  23. #23
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    Ive worn hockey pads for dh at platty. the shin pads shifted a lot, but worked, but for the price difference youd spend buying hockey shin pads, just get some roach FR ones (theyre $50 or $55), i absolutely love mine

    the elbow pads i wore were bulky and shifted waaaay to much, i didnt liek them at all. i bought 661 (i think?) 2x4 elbow/forarm pads, and i really like those too (and i think they were $30 or less like those hockey elbow pads you posted)

    if you have the hockey gear then try it out (which is what i did), but i wouldnt buy hockey gear to use..

    oh and also, i still wear hockey shoulder pads, i like those, not a ton of chest/back protection (i wear a camel back tough), but the plastic shoulders are nice for when i scrape my shoulders on trees all the time.. i havent been able to break down and buy biking upper body protection yet, its costly

  24. #24
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    not sure about the fit and everything, I've never worn them. But I've seend guys ride all day in hocky elbow pads, they seemed to work fine, though they didn't look that comfortable.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by free rider
    im thinking limited mobility and bulkyness....but giver and tell us what you think
    hockey pads are incredibly mobile. the only thing more mobile in my oppinion are lacrosse pads... but that's generally cause they're less burly and bulky.

    the problem you're gonna have with hockey pads is that they're designed to be worn in a refridgerator, and would be pretty hot out on the trail.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by revmonkey
    Easton makes very good gear. So does Franklin. Best if you can try the stuff on in person, though, to make sure of the fit (those shin guards look a little long). And if you're in hockey country, maybe there's a place that sells used equipment? At the prices you're showing, though you're getting real close to 661 gear. The idea of hockey stuff is to save some dough.
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  27. #27
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    ...cheap shin guards?

    Scoccer pads. They're low profile...fit easily under pants and you don't look like a tard if you have to run into the grocery store on the way home from a ride....

    $12
    let's roll

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by free rider
    is that how it works?
    I can't tell if you're being sarcastic or not.





    Yes, that is how it would work.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dminor
    You're getting a lot of whacko advice from people who've never actually used hockey armor for biking. It may sound odd, but hockey gear is very economical protection. Both knee/shin and elbow/forearm guards are more substantial and are compatible with biking depending on the brand. Even the shoulder pads are built better, have better shoulder suspension and even clavicle guards. The only downside - and it's marginal - is the ventilation is not quite as good.

    Only reason I sold my Easton stuff was because I landed a sponsorship a while back.

    I dunno, but man...if you ask me Hockey Pads are designed to be bulky and large for playing..well...hockey because they need to cover so much of the leg. Mine are 14" and they're huge. They fit, but still huge. The extend all the way from the top of my foot (Skate) to the top of the knee.

    I'd just stick to bike pads still, the good hockey shin guards are more expensive also....
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  30. #30
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    go to a play it again sports. they usually have alot of equipment very cheap. recently I've noticed they've got alot more lacrosse gear (as it's getting more popular on the west coast)
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by revmonkey
    From looking at this website it seems to me that hockey armor isn't any cheaper than bike armor. You've just chosen medium priced hockey armor. So why don't you just buy medium priced bike armor?

    There are tons of online web retailers that carry bike armor. I just looked at beyondbikes.com and they had lots of bike armor that was cheaper than the hockey armor you were looking at. So I don't see the point of buying hockey armor that will most likely be WAY hotter to wear. This is a big concern in the middle of summer!!! Plus you bend your knees WAY more and much farther during biking than you do in hockey. I would be worried that the hockey armor is going to bunch behind the knees cause they werent designed for that. And did I mention that there probably going to be really HOT!

    I could see the logic if someone already had the hockey armor and just used it to bike with. I've seen lots of people on bikes with rollorblade armor, especially the elbow stuff which is like 10 bucks. And I used my knee/shin protectors for paintball for a while on my bike just cause that's what I had??? Nothing wrong with using what you already own...

    But if you still have to go out and buy the armor. And the price isn't really much difference. ( you can totally get bike armor for 50 bucks leg, and 30 bucks elbow ) than I don't see the point???

    Plus with hockey armor I would be concerned about is what type of material the pads are covered with. Most anything will slide on ice. But if it hits dirt is it going to "grab"? Cause if your pads stick/grab the dirt it's going to cause a larger impact, and you dramaticly increase the chance that your going to strain or pull a muscle or joint. Which is a bad idea.

    Whereas most mountain bike gear is either something stretchy like spandex on the outside. Which at least stretches and gives on impact so that if it did "grab" the dirt its also streching and not as likely to strain or pull a joint. Or very commonly has a plastic outer shell. Either a big hard plastic pad, or at least a thin covering. The hard plastic obviously has the best impact protection, but both plastic coverings allow the pad, and your body part, to slide when it hits the dirt. Which minimizes what the dirt impact does to your body!!!

    I should point out that I have no idea if those hockey pads will or will not slide on dirt. And that this is just "my opinion". But it's at least worth considering...

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by stiingya
    From looking at this website it seems to me that hockey armor isn't any cheaper than bike armor. You've just chosen medium priced hockey armor. So why don't you just buy medium priced bike armor?

    There are tons of online web retailers that carry bike armor. I just looked at beyondbikes.com and they had lots of bike armor that was cheaper than the hockey armor you were looking at. So I don't see the point of buying hockey armor that will most likely be WAY hotter to wear. This is a big concern in the middle of summer!!! Plus you bend your knees WAY more and much farther during biking than you do in hockey. I would be worried that the hockey armor is going to bunch behind the knees cause they werent designed for that. And did I mention that there probably going to be really HOT!

    I could see the logic if someone already had the hockey armor and just used it to bike with. I've seen lots of people on bikes with rollorblade armor, especially the elbow stuff which is like 10 bucks. And I used my knee/shin protectors for paintball for a while on my bike just cause that's what I had??? Nothing wrong with using what you already own...

    But if you still have to go out and buy the armor. And the price isn't really much difference. ( you can totally get bike armor for 50 bucks leg, and 30 bucks elbow ) than I don't see the point???

    Plus with hockey armor I would be concerned about is what type of material the pads are covered with. Most anything will slide on ice. But if it hits dirt is it going to "grab"? Cause if your pads stick/grab the dirt it's going to cause a larger impact, and you dramaticly increase the chance that your going to strain or pull a muscle or joint. Which is a bad idea.

    Whereas most mountain bike gear is either something stretchy like spandex on the outside. Which at least stretches and gives on impact so that if it did "grab" the dirt its also streching and not as likely to strain or pull a joint. Or very commonly has a plastic outer shell. Either a big hard plastic pad, or at least a thin covering. The hard plastic obviously has the best impact protection, but both plastic coverings allow the pad, and your body part, to slide when it hits the dirt. Which minimizes what the dirt impact does to your body!!!

    I should point out that I have no idea if those hockey pads will or will not slide on dirt. And that this is just "my opinion". But it's at least worth considering...
    I disagree with the part I coloured..... In biking your legs just move like up and down and in a circumferancial motion, in hockey they are all over the place....

    But honestly, bike pads are the same price, and are made for biking....
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  33. #33
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    Maybe I didn't explain it as best that it could be. I was mostly talking about how "far" your knees bend. Your legs may be going all over the place in hockey, but your knees aren't being bent as far as they are while pedaling a bike where you need armor. In hockey you spend the majority of the time in a ready crouch, or skating, and your knees are not "normaly" bent that far. Maybe hitting a 35 or 40 degree bend during skating? You bend your knees farther running than you do skating. Plus I'm only talking about the repetitive motion that you go through between biking and skating. I'm sure when you hit the ice, get slammed up against the glass, or end up duking it out in the middle of the rink your knee might get bent pretty crazy. And the goalie bends his knees all crazy!!! But I don't think goalie pads would be too apropriate for the bike trail...

    I think one important distinction here is that most people who wear pads while mountain biking are the ones on dirt jump, down hill, and freeride bikes. Overwhelmingly these people have thier seat down lower than the bars. So that when there at the top of the pedal stroke there knee is bent at an extreme angle. Anywhere from 80 to 110 degrees depending on how low you have your saddle and how far away it is from the cranks. And your pads have to be able to make that bend without bunching up behind your knee. That's why many bike pads try not to have any material, or a very thin material behind the knee. Plus you have to remember how repetitive this knee bend is. A road biker averages 5000 revolutions per hour! Now a freerider isn't getting anywhere near this. But it's still got to be in the hundreds even just riding downhill. And at least breaking into thousands if you pedal to the top of the mountain...

    Now with a regular trail or XC bike set up your knee doesn't have to bend that far. I think your only suppossed to have like a 30 degree knee bend? But it's the low seat that most bikers that use pads have that makes the difference.

  34. #34
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    For my Xc and singletrack riding I found that soccer shin gurads are an excllent choice...they fit like a glove, can take some decent hits, are lightweight, and cost relatively little.

    For extreme riding I'd opt for bike specific gear although utilizing some Lacrosse gear has some good possibilities.
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