Has anyone tried riding two-three ring front and single ring rear?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Has anyone tried riding two-three ring front and single ring rear?

    Has anyone tried riding two-three ring front and single ring rear?

    I'm sick of rear deraileurs, period. I'm sick of being in the wrong gear for pedal kicking off skinnies or even worse, getting ghost shifts that put your shins into unwanted metalic items.

    Can I use a single arm pully in the rear on a single speed cassette while still having enough range for 22-32-44 tooth rings in front?

    That's the what I pretty much use for now. I stand up for pedaling these days so having gears in the rear is pointless. I still need to be able to ride uphill, flat ground, and fast DH so three rings up front is all I need.

  2. #2
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    I'd just learn to adjust a rear derailleur

  3. #3
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    2-speed!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by MicroHuck
    Has anyone tried riding two-three ring front and single ring rear?

    I'm sick of rear deraileurs, period. I'm sick of being in the wrong gear for pedal kicking off skinnies or even worse, getting ghost shifts that put your shins into unwanted metalic items.

    Can I use a single arm pully in the rear on a single speed cassette while still having enough range for 22-32-44 tooth rings in front?

    That's the what I pretty much use for now. I stand up for pedaling these days so having gears in the rear is pointless. I still need to be able to ride uphill, flat ground, and fast DH so three rings up front is all I need.

    Hey
    You can do it but I'm not too sure how it will work for freeriding .
    I have an old Bontrager race light set up as a 2-speed , fun bike !

    I run a 24-36 with a bashring and a Paul single speed rear hub and Melvin, with a Paul front der and Thumbie shifter , it works great and is one of my favorite bikes to ride .

    Great for going to get coffee , pedal kicks of skinnies ....... possibly not ?
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanD
    I'd just learn to adjust a rear derailleur
    That's not the problem.

    The problem is that no matter what system you have, the amount of dirt, clay, sticks, etc, in our area will cause you to have problems shifting.

    The other reason is for weight reduction in the rear. Extra bonus for bunny hopping my hardtail over stumps and logs.

  5. #5
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    get a Sram X9 or X0...enough said
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  6. #6
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    If you ran only the chainrings to shift, how would you keep tension on the chain?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MicroHuck
    That's not the problem.

    The problem is that no matter what system you have, the amount of dirt, clay, sticks, etc, in our area will cause you to have problems shifting.

    The other reason is for weight reduction in the rear. Extra bonus for bunny hopping my hardtail over stumps and logs.
    exept you'll need a rear derailler (or equivalent tensioner) to spool up the extra chain need for front gearing. And a decent derailler/drivetrain and full length housing can do wonders
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunslingger
    no doubt you must have majored in english or something rad!!!

  8. #8
    Uhhhhh...
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    Quote Originally Posted by MicroHuck
    That's not the problem.

    The problem is that no matter what system you have, the amount of dirt, clay, sticks, etc, in our area will cause you to have problems shifting.

    The other reason is for weight reduction in the rear. Extra bonus for bunny hopping my hardtail over stumps and logs.
    Uh, 99% of people seem to not have a problem.
    Fayetteville, AR and N.W.A RePrEsEnT

  9. #9
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    use a single arm pully
    This is how he is going to keep tension!
    It's not a good ride if you don't scare yourself at least once.


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by drum714
    This is how he is going to keep tension!
    he can have fun trying to keep a decent chain line with 3 rings up front...it is a horrible idea. A properly set up and adjusted derailleur will work.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by drum714
    This is how he is going to keep tension!
    you need dual pulleys like a derailler uses to spool up the chain effectively and keep enough tension.

    Also he'll need to create a guide for the rear sprocket
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunslingger
    no doubt you must have majored in english or something rad!!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    you need dual pulleys like a derailler uses to spool up the chain effectively and keep enough tension.

    Also he'll need to create a guide for the rear sprocket
    you need dual pulleys like a derailler uses to spool up the chain effectively and keep enough tension.

    Also he'll need to create a guide for the rear sprocket
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  13. #13
    [email protected] NYC Freerider
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    i run my hardrock like that....i have 3 rings in front and a busted rear derailer in back that runs single speed....no brakes either.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    you need dual pulleys like a derailler uses to spool up the chain effectively and keep enough tension.

    Also he'll need to create a guide for the rear sprocket

    I could easily make my own tensioner, that's no issue. Very easy.


    My reasoning behind doing this is simple:

    I want simplicity. I slip off skinnies all the time and bend my der. slightly, causing bad shifts.

    I want less weight in the rear (to compensate for my heavy 2.5 Minion rear tire)

    I'm at the point where I keep the rear on one cog the whole time and use the front rings to adjust for gearing. I'm liking it a lot so far. I prefer having the rear set so it's perfect for pedal kicks, I don't need to pedal much otherwise when riding stunts.

    I would just go full out single speed, but I need at least some range to get me up hills and get me down hills fast.

    The high end SRAM der. looks cool. Lightweight and precise shifting, but I'm not about to drop $200 on one to find it isn't going to cut it.

  15. #15
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    ... and if we just ... Run it SS

    Seriously, that would solve your problem. You can choose a gear that will give you plenty of speed on the flats and downhills while still being able to pedal up hills.

    OR

    Like everyone else said, get a quality rear derailleur, full length housing, and keep it properly adjusted.

    OR

    Spend some dough and get a Rohloff (but then again, that won't decrease the weight on the rear end of your bike).

    Option 2 seems the easiest, cheapest, and most reliable. My $0.02.

    Cheers,

    KavuRider
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MicroHuck
    I could easily make my own tensioner, that's no issue. Very easy.


    My reasoning behind doing this is simple:

    I want simplicity. I slip off skinnies all the time and bend my der. slightly, causing bad shifts.

    I want less weight in the rear (to compensate for my heavy 2.5 Minion rear tire)
    so instead you'll bend your home made tensioner, exept that will derail your chain. And the derailler weighs less than the mud on your tires...

    just do it tho, no sense in trying to convince us (ie. why are you asking for advice you dont want?).

    The irony is the most effective tensioners are either deraillers, or look like deraillers. Theres no difference in removing all your cogs and using a tensioner, when you could just run your bike as-is and simply never shift. Think about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunslingger
    no doubt you must have majored in english or something rad!!!

  17. #17
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    maybe someone said this but u could try adjusting the lil screws that limit the range down to 0 so the r. derailuer cant actually move... just an idea

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    so instead you'll bend your home made tensioner, exept that will derail your chain. And the derailler weighs less than the mud on your tires...

    just do it tho, no sense in trying to convince us (ie. why are you asking for advice you dont want?).

    The irony is the most effective tensioners are either deraillers, or look like deraillers. Theres no difference in removing all your cogs and using a tensioner, when you could just run your bike as-is and simply never shift. Think about it.

    Are there any rear deraileurs that don't cost over $90 that hold a gear perfectly? Even when jammed full of mud? That's my main concern.

    I've seen plenty of high end bikes out where I ride and not a single one has perfect shifting after a couple smashes into the mud pits. That's wy I'm hesitant to buy a high end deraileur if I'm just going to mess it up anyways.

    Are there any out there that have a super strong cable tension? Maybe for a better hold onto gears for less slipping?

  19. #19
    Got Doubles? Pun Intended
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    I tried it for a while with a shork cage derailleur in the rear.

    Run a small piece of cable through the derailleur like in my "half as$ diagram".
    Keep the calbe as tight as possible and set the limits on the derailleur to stay just under your single rear gear.



    I used the Gusset 1-er Single Speed Speed converter. With a short cage rear derailleur.
    Up front I ran a Saint Crankset 32/22 with a Saint front Derailleur.

    It worked well for me. The bike was an On-One Gimp. The front fork was a DJ1 taken down to 90mm travel. I ran Peg in the rear. I was riding alot of Street and Skate Park. I'd smack my rear derailleur all the time. I spent half of my riding time trying to adjust my rear derailleur.
    Then I went to the 2 speed set up I described above and it was great. There's still a derailleur there but when the cable is pulled tight and the limits are set, you'll break the derailleur off before you knock it out of line.
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  20. #20
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    Have you tried yelling at it!

    You seem to have thought of everything else.
    Jesus is my co-pilot...... and right now we are cruisin' for pvssy

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeriderizzle
    I tried it for a while with a shork cage derailleur in the rear.

    Run a small piece of cable through the derailleur like in my "half as$ diagram".
    Keep the calbe as tight as possible and set the limits on the derailleur to stay just under your single rear gear.



    I used the Gusset 1-er Single Speed Speed converter. With a short cage rear derailleur.
    Up front I ran a Saint Crankset 32/22 with a Saint front Derailleur.

    It worked well for me. The bike was an On-One Gimp. The front fork was a DJ1 taken down to 90mm travel. I ran Peg in the rear. I was riding alot of Street and Skate Park. I'd smack my rear derailleur all the time. I spent half of my riding time trying to adjust my rear derailleur.
    Then I went to the 2 speed set up I described above and it was great. There's still a derailleur there but when the cable is pulled tight and the limits are set, you'll break the derailleur off before you knock it out of line.
    Cool. Maybe I will take one of my old road bike rear der. and putting it on and using the short cable, looks good. It's a bit lighter than most long range ders.

    I will also save a bit of weight by losing the rear cassette.


    Right now my choices are as follows:

    Get bash guard up front and continue using rear cassette with a der. that actually holds (if there is one?)

    or

    Go single speed rear- three speed front. I've never tried this, so I think it's worth a shot.

  22. #22
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    Best solution...Ride on curbs untill you get your skills up then go back to skinnies.
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  23. #23
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    i would get a sram der and shifters and ect..

  24. #24
    rollin
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    i'm sick of rear deraileurs too. i keep bashing them on rocks and they all end up with an odd "S" shape to the hanger. can't wait for the internal tranny to dominate the market. in the meantime, i find myself browsing the rohloff and shimano nexus websites. unfortunately, the cost of a rohloff is insane, and i hear they are slow. anyone tried a rohloff? i have an idea of the cost, but don't see and accurate cost, or a place to buy one.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    you need dual pulleys like a derailler uses to spool up the chain effectively and keep enough tension.

    Also he'll need to create a guide for the rear sprocket
    you're supposed to quote him in the box... like ^ that one...

    ...not in your text...

  26. #26
    dh mike
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    18T single speed gussetter & 22 & 32 on the cranks

    works great
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  27. #27
    dh mike
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    18T single speed gussetter & 22 & 32 on the cranks

    18T single speed gussetter & 22 & 32 on the cranks

    sorry bad photo
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  28. #28
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    all just a bunch of lazy @$$es...if you don't do maintenance on a car...you will get a big bill. Just tinker with the bike every now and then and don't let it fall apart. Take care of it and then you won't post about ghost shifting and such. Ask WCH how much work I do on my bike. I never have problems like that.

    Do the maintenance
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  29. #29
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    SMT...I wish it was always that easy...I am super meticulous about my bikes. I do maintinence after every 2 or 3 rides. The issue for me and I think fot he kid who started this thread is from actually trashing and damaging components. I went through 3 derailleurs learning how to grind handrails.

    The simple issue is run a BMX type set up...Single Speed. But the advantage of a 2 speed was incredible for me. I was able to gain more speed in a small run up or actually have the larger gear to pedal hard for long distances.

    The weigt wasn't my issue but it was noticeable as well.
    Different strokes for different folks.

    Once again your insight, SMT, is always on point...I just think this issue was more specific.
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  30. #30
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    u should just run that baby single speed...

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by MicroHuck
    Has anyone tried riding two-three ring front and single ring rear?

    I'm sick of rear deraileurs, period. I'm sick of being in the wrong gear for pedal kicking off skinnies or even worse, getting ghost shifts that put your shins into unwanted metalic items.

    Can I use a single arm pully in the rear on a single speed cassette while still having enough range for 22-32-44 tooth rings in front?

    That's the what I pretty much use for now. I stand up for pedaling these days so having gears in the rear is pointless. I still need to be able to ride uphill, flat ground, and fast DH so three rings up front is all I need.
    Sound like a good candidate for a Rohloff.....

  32. #32
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    I went riding at one of my local trails in the rain today, and I got thick mud all over the RD and the chain and the ... EVERYwhere. Thick, gritty mud. Coated my chain. Nothing a little White Lightning and my bad ass SRAM XO couldn't handle. THere was a lot of gritty noise in the chain but the shifting went just fine.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeriderizzle
    SMT...I wish it was always that easy...I am super meticulous about my bikes. I do maintinence after every 2 or 3 rides. The issue for me and I think fot he kid who started this thread is from actually trashing and damaging components. I went through 3 derailleurs learning how to grind handrails.

    The simple issue is run a BMX type set up...Single Speed. But the advantage of a 2 speed was incredible for me. I was able to gain more speed in a small run up or actually have the larger gear to pedal hard for long distances.

    The weigt wasn't my issue but it was noticeable as well.
    Different strokes for different folks.

    Once again your insight, SMT, is always on point...I just think this issue was more specific.
    I get you.....but if he falls so many times on skinnies then he should practice on a curb instead of:

    A) destoying equipment
    B) complaining about it
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobsterCraw
    I went riding at one of my local trails in the rain today, and I got thick mud all over the RD and the chain and the ... EVERYwhere. Thick, gritty mud. Coated my chain. Nothing a little White Lightning and my bad ass SRAM XO couldn't handle. THere was a lot of gritty noise in the chain but the shifting went just fine.
    wish we could have more rain in socal...better for the trails
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  35. #35
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    SMT- If there's a der. that will take a pounding and always hold a gear, I'm all ears. I read some reviews on the X-9 and X-0. Seems they have a tendency to snap when hit
    Otherwise a good der.


    Speaking of skilz and skinnies, just how skinny do you think I'm talking about? Curbs are easy, planks only a little wider than a tire are not! I don't think very many people can keep from slipping the rear wheel on SUPER skinny stuff.

    Maybe I should just stop riding skinnies? I don't think theres any der. that can take a hard hit and still maintain proper shifting. If there is, I'm still all ears.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    On a side note: It's funny how low the assumed age range is on this forum! I'm nearly twice as old as most of you "kids". I just don't act like it I'll always be a kid if I keep spending more money on biking than on my car

    What exactly is a Rohloff? Is it an internally geared hub? I might consider something like THAT!!! Even if it does weigh more and is expensive, it would be nice to have something that holds a gear without slipping and doesn't snap when I fall off a skinny.

  36. #36
    gnar, brah
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    Quote Originally Posted by MicroHuck
    SMT- If there's a der. that will take a pounding and always hold a gear, I'm all ears. I read some reviews on the X-9 and X-0. Seems they have a tendency to snap when hit
    Otherwise a good der.


    Speaking of skilz and skinnies, just how skinny do you think I'm talking about? Curbs are easy, planks only a little wider than a tire are not! I don't think very many people can keep from slipping the rear wheel on SUPER skinny stuff.

    Maybe I should just stop riding skinnies? I don't think theres any der. that can take a hard hit and still maintain proper shifting. If there is, I'm still all ears.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    On a side note: It's funny how low the assumed age range is on this forum! I'm nearly twice as old as most of you "kids". I just don't act like it I'll always be a kid if I keep spending more money on biking than on my car

    What exactly is a Rohloff? Is it an internally geared hub? I might consider something like THAT!!! Even if it does weigh more and is expensive, it would be nice to have something that holds a gear without slipping and doesn't snap when I fall off a skinny.
    The Saint rear derailleur has rubber in some strategic locations to help absorb the force of a big impact. Probably will hold up to quite a bit, but you will need some new hardware to make it fit.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MicroHuck
    Maybe I should just stop riding skinnies? I don't think theres any der. that can take a hard hit and still maintain proper shifting. If there is, I'm still all ears.
    YEAH...Thats the idea...lets quit trying any time something gets difficult.

    Skinnies take quit a while to master. Thats why we all enjoy watching Ryan Leech kill it in the Collective video riding that handrail to chain back to handrail. If everyone could do it then it wouldn't be impressive.
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  38. #38
    AAAAAAAIIIIIIIIIEEEE!!!
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    rohloff

    search speedhub nate's posts on the rohloff hub. It's a 14-speed internal hub that works pretty much no matter what. 'tis a little heavier though. http://www.rohloff.de/index.php?p=PRODUKTE/SPEEDHUB

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