Give your opinion on the best pedalable freeride/DJ capable bike- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Give your opinion on the best pedalable freeride/DJ capable bike

    So, I am looking for a new bike. I'm ready to step it up from my current all-mountain setup (07 Blur LT) and get something that's more aggressive and more stable in gnarly steep terrain with big hits. I've already got a DH bike (V-10) for racing/lift access, so this has to work as my trail bike also (meaning the Bullit is probably out).

    These criteria would seem to lead me to something like a Nomad, a Reign X, or Trek Remedy, but here's the catch: I recently started riding with some guys at a local slopestyle/dirt jump area and I'd really like my new bike to be somewhat capable on that too because I'm really psyched on it.

    So, does anyone have experience riding any of the bikes I mentioned on dirt jumps? What about a Transition Bottlerocket? I've heard the 09 Nomads are not as free-ride worthy as the older generation, is this true? If I just have to have 3 bikes, one DH, one pedalable FR, and one DJ bike, just tell it to me straight.

    Thanks in advance for any informed opinions you can throw down!

  2. #2
    NICE KID...NICE
    Reputation: wookie freeride's Avatar
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    heres a few

    Transition Bottlerocket
    Transition Double
    Jamis Parker
    Intense SS
    Trek Remedy
    Kona Cowan DS or a Bass

    Get something with an air shock. That way you can boost the air for jumping and run some sage if you are trail riding or freeriding.
    "At that point man, your just riding your bike."


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  3. #3
    percocet pioneer.
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    bottlerocket

  4. #4
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    Banshee Rampant
    Banshee Wildcard
    Mongoose Nugget
    Soul Cycles Matador
    Santa Cruz Blur 4X
    Specialized SX/SX Trail
    Plenty of bikes that could suit your criteria.

  5. #5
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    I have a reign X and used to have a bottlerocket. the Reign is much more pedal friendly but not as poppy as the bottlerocket. if you want to do SS type riding, bottlerocket is a great choice.

  6. #6
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    Transition Double!

  7. #7
    NICE KID...NICE
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    Dont think I caught this the first read...

    Are you a chick? .......Transition Siren or Kona Minkxy

    If so How tall are you. I did not mention the Transition Siren in my original post...but i did not catch that you were a woman.. It is a dedicated freeride Bike for women. I have not seen one in person but everything I have seen and read make me think it would be worth throwing out there.
    "At that point man, your just riding your bike."


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  8. #8
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    Bottle Rockets are PIMP!!!
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    Marin - Transition - Santa Cruz - Cove...

  9. #9
    NICE KID...NICE
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    That they are

    That they are...
    "At that point man, your just riding your bike."


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  10. #10
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    Whoa now! Let's turn down the transition humping and listen to the original poster.

    Although the bottle rocket is a good slopestyle bike, there are certainly lighter, more versatile & better pedaling frames that should be considered. Bikes like the wildcard or bottle rocket are fantastic for smooth transition freeride and dirt jumps. However, something like a nomad, DW RFX, Reign X, Intense SS are going to be worlds more versatile when the trail turns bumpy or heaven forbid, uphill.

    You've already got a great trailbike and DH sled, and it sounds like you are looking for the nomad. These frames are really versatile depending upon how you build them, and can be really capable for freeride and transition riding. A local guy kills it at Blackrock on one, and he swears by it over his DHR.

    Best of luck!

  11. #11
    maker of trail
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    I'd say get a DJ hard tail and a pedalable FR bike.

    You'll loose a lot of energy at the jumps with a squish, and the geo is not that comparable, DJ bikes are more XC head angles, where as a trail bike you probably want a bit slacker.

    I'd look at:
    - Intense SS or Uzzi
    - Trek remedy
    - Giant reign x
    - Corsair Konig or Marque
    - SX trail

    just to name a few...

  12. #12
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    I've gotten lots of recommendations for the Bottle Rocket and I'm considering one. Looks like they are not as versatile as trail bikes but considering the price I might be able to afford to keep my blur.

    As for the Syren and Minxy, blame it on my skiing roots but I'm not really interested in anything called "women's specific".

    Has anybody ridden the 09 Nomad? I was all psyched on that bike but recently heard from a pro slope-styler who uses an older model Nomad that he won't be getting the new one because they made it so uphill friendly that it no longer stacks up in FR/DH terrain.

    And what about the other transition bikes like a Preston FR? Does anyone have any experience using a Nomad or Preston FR on dirt jump territory like a 4X or Dual Slalom track?
    Or, does anyone have any experience trying to use the BottleRocket on rough trails where they may need to pedal to the top?
    I'm going to take a look at the Intense SS and Uzzi. Thanks for the ideas.

  13. #13
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    There is a thread in the transition forum discussing the nomad (old) versus the Preston FR that may be worth reading. I've ridden a bottle rocket on a trail ride, and it's biggest drawback is the short seat tube and 9.5lb frame weight.

  14. #14
    Im a huck bunny
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    Typical

    "As for the Syren and Minxy, blame it on my skiing roots but I'm not really interested in anything called "women's specific"."

    Why would you want a bike with better stand over higth, lighter weight and Geo fo a smaller framed person?

    If you were forced to ride a Mans bike it youd be sexest. Men make bike specificaly for women and thats sexest too. O K

    As for a pedable freeride bike, well that I feal is strickly a matter of opinion. Just make sure it is smaller than the V10 and bigger than the Blur....AND most important it is what you want. If you like no LOVE the bike enough you will pedal it where ever it needs to go.

    If the Nomad worked for slopstyle, I think more pros would be using them in the events. Isnt the Blur there slopstyle Bike? And if you are a female you probably are realitivly light. The only VPP linkage I would recommend fo Slopstyle and jumping is the Intense SS.
    Sounds like you need a DJ hard tail.

    JUST MY OPINION. Good luck in you search.
    Last edited by NortheastHucker; 04-27-2009 at 11:23 AM. Reason: Grammer
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  15. #15
    check your six
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    I have a Bottlerocket built for more agressive freeride. At first I wanted the Bottlerocket to use as my "everything but downhill" bike. It slowly turned into me getting a bike for every need, DH, FR, DJ, and Urban.

    However, the Bottlerocket is not my favorite weapon of choice when it comes to rough trail riding or especially DH-ing. The bike fits best in the freeride / SS category. I am running mine with a DHX 5.0 coil and a 66 RC2X and it weighs 39.08lbs. One thing I can say for the Bottlerocket is, it LOVES to be in the air. A trail with nice booters/drops onto smooth buttery trannys or tabletops is where the Bottherocket shines.

    As for climbing with the BR?? Ugh... not unless you have 400mm of seatpost sticking out. At that point it actually climbs well, but the bike looks like a clown shoud be on it!

    If you are looking for a more trail friendly bike I would look into the Remedy, Nomad, Intense SS, or the SX-Trail. I reallly like the SX-trail, fairly light and I believe 6-7 inches travel too. With an air shock that bike would feel amazing, I think.... as I have never seen one....
    "We can always find excuses if we want to find them, but if we really want to do something, we have to just go."

  16. #16
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    lets throw the bullit in the mix :-)
    No matter what you do, go ahead and take the chance and live a bit crazy
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  17. #17
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    You have a real big bike ( v10) so I would recomend a hardtial or bike like the Dubble for jumping duties. The nice thing about the Dubble is it still is fun in the park were a hardtail can be harsh. Unless your riding pumptracks or street I would take a little squish anyday. Plus you sound like you are used to alot of travel.

    As far as the inbetween rig goes,what do you exspect out of your trail bike? Log epics or just being able to climb to the top of a Dh run? I have done the Blt thing and it works for bigger hits than you think but the small bump sucks and BB is a bit high for me (w/36). My Nomad ( 07/08) works increadable as a tailbike but still puts me on the podiem in Cat 1 smooth DH races. It jumps great and pedals like a champ. I would stay whith your idea as far as bikes in the range. If you go bigger like Uzzi or other big hit bikes. You are getting to close to a DH rig and pushing the trail bike out a bit. You are the only on that really knows what you ride/need.

    My wife rides a Syren and loves it, not because its a chick bike but because it works, That being said whe wouldnt ride it on any epics but its set up for DH/FR.

    0-4"
    5-7'
    8-10"
    Your going to be golden

    My nomad has worked so good that I dropped my DH rig. But regret it on big shuttle days. If your just going for two bikes, DJ bike and the Uzzi would be the ticket.

  18. #18
    maker of trail
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    FWIW, I'd put less emphasis on the amount of travel, can you really tell when you have 1/2" less travel?

    I'd concentrate more on geometry for the application, which is really what determines how the bike feels, less so the physical amount of travel.

  19. #19
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    Hey Hucker- I didn't say anything about a women's specific bike being "sexest" and didn't infer it, so don't start that. There is a legitimate demand for 'women's specific' gear but I am 5'11 and 155lbs so the plain fact is that all women's specific gear I've tried has felt squishy and substandard to me. I've researched the Syren and Minxy and found that one of the primary design factors put into these bikes is to give a shorter than average person the ability to ride a big travel bike with no standover issues. So it just doesn't seem to be designed with a person like me in mind. Christ, I need to change my screen name!

    Everybody else- Thanks for the input, I'll look for the PrestonFR VS. Nomad thread. Looks like I might be focusing in on a freeride-trail bike for now and getting some kind of more park-oriented full suspension DJ bike later when I can afford it, probably a bottle rocket.
    M-dub, if I get a Nomad I think I will end up running it on the smoother DH races around here, good idea and thanks!

  20. #20
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    A preston would be a good mix of pedalability and jumpability. I have a BR and a Double. I ride the double more. I use it mostly for smoother trails, jumping and freeride. I would dare take it on a rocky Dh run though. The bottlerocket is really good all around but I really don't ride DH on it anymore unless it's fairly smooth trails.
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  21. #21
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    if you actually want to spend a lot of time riding jumps and get good at dirt jumping, buy a DJ specific hardtail (or even rigid) bike. FR/DH and DJ require almost opposite geometries. i couldn't imagine riding a squishy bike on a jump line.

  22. #22
    SamIAm
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    SxTrail or SX depending on how much travel you want.

    i only have one bike so i needed something that i can xc/trail and dh/fr/dj on as well. 2 different wheelsets and my sxt is golden.
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  23. #23
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    I don't know if there are any left, but you should be watching "Chainlove.com" for a deal on the Intense Slopestyle frame. Last Friday, they were up for $999!!! They had smalls and mediums.
    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo
    The internet sounds like a tough place to ride.

  24. #24
    Roll on Spring Time!
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    Wildcard solves all the listed requirements for me. 2 hour rides to freeride and DJ. I am running air shock specificaly so I can frim up the rear for jumping. If you plan on specificaly doing more DJ and trail I would look at an adjustable fork cause in 5" setting the head angle will be 67 degrees, not really money for DJ. The BB is low so it rips corners and it has a firm pedal platform so sprints like mad. In 5" its really progressive.

  25. #25
    gnar, brah
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    If you are riding a dirtjump spot and want to get the most out of it, a DJ-specific hardtail is the way to go.

    Be careful, it will soon become your favorite bike.
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  26. #26
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    ^ i agree with this guy, if you psyched about the dirt jumps, get a dirt jump bike don't bother getting a full suspension to just ride dirt jumps.
    plus depending one how tech your local slopestyle/dirt jump spot is, it could be ridden on a hardtail just as easy as a 5 inch bike (seens how you already have 2 full suspension show some love for the hardtail!)
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    To be blunt;

    6) The Earth would begin to collapse into a black hole and it would make people sad.

  27. #27
    RiffRaff
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    If you are not riding super tech jump lines you don't need a hardtail. They are fun and cheap though.

    I realy like the Trek remedy and Specialized enduro SL. You can do everything you want and get a trail ride in. The geos are very similar. The wild card looks dope. From what iv seen in pics and the geo it has to rip. I have not riden the wild card though.
    "If Liberace was alive, he'd be proud to ride that mofo."

  28. #28
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    Hmm. The dirt j umping area near where I live is, well, rather huge. The jumps are huge, the drops are huge, everything is huge. Not like a bmx track at all. All of the guys that ride there do so on full suspension bikes, some on full on DH bikes.
    There was a pro event there this weekend and a couple of the pros rode hard tails and commented about how sketchy it was (even though one of those guys did a backflip over a 40' gap! it was amazing.)
    I'm thinking I'll get two bikes: a new Nomad with either a totem or a lyric on it, and then later a used full suspension 'slopestyle' bike.
    I seriously considered the Preston, but even over in the Transition forum most people thought it couldn't hold a candle to the Nomad uphill or downhill.
    What is this Wildcard I keep hearing about and who makes it?

  29. #29
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    I use a 7point as my do-all bicycling machine of love. My riding is about a quarter XC-trail with the rest split evenly between DJ/DH-FR. Bike felt like butt mud in the air at stock 43lbs, but its around low 38lbs now and feels fine. Hell, some of the DJ specific bikes come in around 35. It pedals fine uphill, though I tend to end up at the top a few minutes after pals on sub 30 machines. It's definitely "stable in gnarly steep terrain with big hits."

    Can't give you a "get this one" answer, but hope this helps in someway.

  30. #30
    NICE KID...NICE
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    Banshee

    http://www.mtbr.com/cat/bikes/freeri...6_1543crx.aspx

    How often do you ride you V10? Every consider selling that for a smaller travel DH frame that can do a little freeride. Driver 8 maybe. If you get a DH frame with a Roco TST shock, you can turn up the "propedal" all mountain setting and shorten your travel for the climbs. I have ridden this shock in a bottlerocket and with the climbing setting on the bike only had about 2 inches of travel and nearly 0 pedal bob.

    How is your Blur set up, whats the build. Any reason your not using the Blur for those big dirtjumps. I have seen some people going pretty big on the newer blurs.

    If you like the Nomad than I say get it. You may not like it for the DJs but it will work. If you are trail riding and climbing more than you will riding DJs, you will like the Nomad no matter what. If you get just a slopstyle bike you may like it for the DJs but hate it on the trail.

    So... in conclusion, get the bike that best fits the discipline you will be riding the most.

    You can always find a haggered, cheap, slopestyle bike if you find yourself riding more DJs.

    I feel your pain. That is why I have so many bikes. Still looking for the perfect one...Light, strong, low slung, good BB clearance, flickable, pedalable, jumps well, and...affordable.

    Good luck with your search...I am anxious to see you final pick.
    Last edited by wookie freeride; 04-28-2009 at 11:51 AM. Reason: I suck a grammer
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  31. #31
    Slopestyle Rider
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    Given you ride The Ranch course (saw your pics over on the Western Slope forum)... a Bottlerocket would be perfect for you.

  32. #32
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    Wookie,
    Well, right now I don't ride the V-10 as much as I'd like to. I bought it specifically for racing and getting into DH and there's not much lift-served or truly DH terrain around here (though there is some), but that will change this summer when the resorts and high country open up, so I'm keeping it. I probably will get the Nomad, maybe with a totem on it, and later get a good deal on a used slopestyle/bottlerocket type bike.

  33. #33
    squish is good
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    Coming to the game a little late here but to throw my pick in, I'd recommend a Norco Six. I rode one for a couple hours at a Norco Demo the other day and it did pretty much everything extremely well. I spent most of my time on it at the flow park sessioning the jump and drop lines and was very impressed. It climbed really well too. It's on the top of my list for a new trail/freeride bike at the moment.
    Bike good, work bad.

  34. #34
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    I'm in love with my Wildcard and think it fits this category even tho it's not built up a light as an average trail rider might like. The only thing is I'm wishing that the domain uturn was 135-180mm instead of 115-160mm. That would make the bike absolutely perfect for all of my uses.

    I've taken it trail riding. I've taken it to my BMX jumps (both racer style and rhythm), and I'm going to take it for some lift assist as soon as possible but I can't see that turning out to be anything but amazing.

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