Downhill Induced Nausea- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well Downhill Induced Nausea

    When I am timing myself on a DH run "which I may add is not very long" and about half way through, I get very nauscious. To the point where i either throw-up, or get very close. This is very puzzling on my part, because I can do very sustained and technical climbs and NEVER feel this. It is only when I am pushing myself on the downhills and also note that i still get this even if i am or am not running on an empty stomach. I am in very good shape right now so that is not the problem. Let me know if you have any tips or ideas. These are my 3 possible explanations:

    1. I have develped muscles for endurace, not for sprinting.

    2. Just the fact that I am timing myself and have set a time i need to beat causes "anxiety" for lack of a better term?

    3. I am not breathing right "holding my breath?" I havent really payed attention to how I breathe on the descents.
    If I want your opinion, I will give give it to you...

    You got like 3 feet of air that time... -Napoleon Dynamite

  2. #2
    [email protected] NYC Freerider
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    might be a form of motion sickness? all the jitter not playing well on your body. might be somthing you ate/eating.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Master_Jako
    might be a form of motion sickness? all the jitter not playing well on your body. might be somthing you ate/eating.
    That could very well be true. Maybe I'll look into motion sickness meds?
    If I want your opinion, I will give give it to you...

    You got like 3 feet of air that time... -Napoleon Dynamite

  4. #4
    Glad to Be Alive
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    I would say you are holding your breath a little too long in the hard spots.....

    try

    breathing in and out like a freight train on your next ride

    also work faster up the mountains to build more endurance
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    I would say you are holding your breath a little too long in the hard spots.....

    try

    breathing in and out like a freight train on your next ride

    also work faster up the mountains to build more endurance
    Im going riding tomarrow morning, and i will put both these tips into practace. I'll repost on results. Thanks for the help!
    If I want your opinion, I will give give it to you...

    You got like 3 feet of air that time... -Napoleon Dynamite

  6. #6
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    Maybe a rapid change in altitude is something your body doesn't like. That would explain why it does it on the descents but not when climbing. You're going down much faster than you're going up. Just a thought.

  7. #7
    moaaar shimz
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaky69
    Maybe a rapid change in altitude is something your body doesn't like. That would explain why it does it on the descents but not when climbing. You're going down much faster than you're going up. Just a thought.
    That has logic to me, just depends how much you decend.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaky69
    Maybe a rapid change in altitude is something your body doesn't like. That would explain why it does it on the descents but not when climbing. You're going down much faster than you're going up. Just a thought.
    Im not making that dramatic of a changed in altitude. But in the mountains and ski resorts i could see some logic in that though.
    If I want your opinion, I will give give it to you...

    You got like 3 feet of air that time... -Napoleon Dynamite

  9. #9
    moaaar shimz
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    Hm then go to a doctor...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountainbikextremist
    I am in very good shape right now so that is not the problem.
    Says you. Seriously, though, are you extremely out of breath when this happens? Is your heart rate highly elevated?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mountainbikextremist
    Let me know if you have any tips or ideas.
    I may, depending on how you answer the above questions.

    Patrick

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountainbikextremist
    1. I have develped muscles for endurace, not for sprinting..
    That's your answer. You're not use to going anerobic. Do multiple hill climbs as fast till you want to puke. Or do multiple flat land sprints (intervals) till you want to puke. Oh yeah this type of training should make you faster because you can go anerobic for a longer time.

  12. #12
    Pro Crastinator
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    i get the same feeling from a local jump line that is about 20 jumps long (only spanning a few hundred yards, not an entire hillside). when i get to the end i very regularly get the dry heaves, not sure what gives...


  13. #13
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    i used to race bikes for suzuki, threw up after EVERY race. 122 races, vomit. motion sickness at its best. i tried dramamine but it made me drowsy so, no go with that. i dont get it on downhill run, but dirt jumping always makes me a bit dizzy, i never eat beforehand. keep us posted if you figure something out.

  14. #14
    Equal opportunity meanie
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    It is you shocking your muscles that are not accustomed to that sort of activity (fast twitch reactions - high intensity). It is also amplified by you holding your breath. Example: hold your breath for 60 seconds while doing clapper pushups as fast as you can - same thing will happen (I do not recommend you actually do this unless you're really damned bored, but you can certainely imagine the effects). Keep doing really rough DH runs. Make your muscles feel that lactic acid pump from hard hits, not endurance.

    This is one I learned from watching Duncan Riffle race. You can hear him over his bike when he's pinning it. The sound you hear is his breathing rythym (sp?) he keeps a constant cadace through his runs - I think. He may alter it before technical sections or sprint sections, but you get the idea. Some sort of breathing regulation is definetely necessary for sprints.

    If you're comfortable on the bike and riding within your limits anxiety isn't an issue since you're probably used to the adrenaline rush associated with a fast DH run.

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