Downhill With F7 or F8- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Zach Kowalchuk
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    Downhill With F7 or F8

    I want to run some moderate downhill on my F8 and I want to get my dad to ride it on his F7.

    If we switched out the forks on each bike to something with 140-180mm travel be good and the brakes to some hydros?

    Were not going to be running downhill all the time, just once in a while.
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  2. #2
    BrassBalled DropbarNinja
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    I've no idea what you're talking about... Now.. what about an F5??? XD


  3. #3
    Zach Kowalchuk
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrpercussive
    I've no idea what you're talking about... Now.. what about an F5??? XD


    Lol, I should have said cannondale F8 and F7. I know I could probably run the downhill trail with the stock fork because I've already run my full rigid on it.

    But Would 140-180mm travel fork be too much for an XC/AM/Singletrack/Trail bike?
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  4. #4
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    the bikes just flat out aren't designed for the abuse of downhill... they will NOT take a fork anything near 180mm, they headtube angle is also quite steep, maybe a 140mm fork *if that would have to see what cannondale recommends for A2C* some hydro's would help on some beginner runs i guess here and there, but i'd be nervous as hell doing it and you'll probalbly trash the bike to hell sadly.

  5. #5
    StraightOuttaCompton
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    yeah that bike is not designed to take a beating. i would just save up if you want to ride dh and get a dedicated rig.
    HARDTAIL PRIDE- 09 Kona Five-0

  6. #6
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    if you're talking about riding the river valley in edmonton, your bike will be just fine as long as you don't start doing any crazy jumps with it. if you're thinking about going out to rabbit, again your bike will be ok if you stay away from the jumps and drops. if you are thinking of heading to the mountains to do some actual DH, as others have said, you'd best look for a bike designed for DH.
    Last edited by damaltor; 05-08-2009 at 12:48 PM.

  7. #7
    Zach Kowalchuk
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    Quote Originally Posted by damaltor
    if you're talking about riding the river valley in edmonton, you're bike will be just fine as long as you don't start doing any crazy jumps with it. if you're thinking about going out to rabbit, again you're bike will be ok if you stay away from the jumps and drops. if you are thinking of heading to the mountains to do some actual DH, as others have said, you'd best look for a bike designed for DH.
    Downhill in the ravine, not crazy ass downhill.

    I've already dropped it 3 feet on a log drop. I've done bigger with a toys'r'us bike with 24" rims.

    I just figured I'd get a better fork in a few months if I'm going to start riding harder.
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  8. #8
    Glad to Be Alive
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    Quote Originally Posted by zadey1234
    Downhill in the ravine, not crazy ass downhill.

    I've already dropped it 3 feet on a log drop. I've done bigger with a toys'r'us bike with 24" rims.

    I just figured I'd get a better fork in a few months if I'm going to start riding harder.
    keep that up and you are going to get hurt
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  9. #9
    Zach Kowalchuk
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    keep that up and you are going to get hurt

    When I had that bike, thats when I started going big, I rode it like that for a good 2 years.

    And not to be a dick or anything but I hate it when people tell me that I can't do hit big stuff on a crappy bike. I've only had walmart and toys'r'us bike up until I got the F8 last month. And I've done an 8 foot ladder drop on that toys'r'us bike. So please don't tell me what I can and can't hit.
    At the end of the day, my bike is a bike, whether its made for XC singletrack or DH, I can make it do what I want.

  10. #10
    BrassBalled DropbarNinja
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    Quote Originally Posted by zadey1234
    When I had that bike, thats when I started going big, I rode it like that for a good 2 years.

    And not to be a dick or anything but I hate it when people tell me that I can't do hit big stuff on a crappy bike. I've only had walmart and toys'r'us bike up until I got the F8 last month. And I've done an 8 foot ladder drop on that toys'r'us bike. So please don't tell me what I can and can't hit.
    not about what you can or can not hit... more about the bike breaking on you from fatigue... just looking otu for you bro...

  11. #11
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    To your original question OP. That bike comes stock with an 80 mm fork. Anything over that is potentially dangerous and the frame is not built to be able to accommodate the extra forces being put on it due to a larger fork.

    That being said you might be able to get away with 100mm, but that might also result in frame failure and is something you should attempt at your own risk.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by zadey1234
    Downhill in the ravine, not crazy ass downhill.

    I've already dropped it 3 feet on a log drop. I've done bigger with a toys'r'us bike with 24" rims.

    I just figured I'd get a better fork in a few months if I'm going to start riding harder.
    there isn't any "Downhill" in the river valley, it's all XC.
    if that's the kind of stuff you're wanting to do, I wouldn't be thinking of getting a better fork for riding harder, I'd be thinking of getting a stronger frame.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munin2889
    To your original question OP. That bike comes stock with an 80 mm fork. Anything over that is potentially dangerous and the frame is not built to be able to accommodate the extra forces being put on it due to a larger fork.

    That being said you might be able to get away with 100mm, but that might also result in frame failure and is something you should attempt at your own risk.
    Cannondale approves the use of a fork with up to 500mm a2c length. That means about 120mm.

    Either way, its far from a DH bike. While it will be ok to ride it downhill. Do not ride it at a DH resort or trail.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dascro
    Cannondale approves the use of a fork with up to 500mm a2c length. That means about 120mm.

    Either way, its far from a DH bike. While it will be ok to ride it downhill. Do not ride it at a DH resort or trail.

    Could you provide me with a link? I am just curious, I couldn't find that info on the interwebs. So I just went with what the stock fork was. If it truly is 500 mm a2c, then you could potentially put a Fox 130mm as the a2c is right at 500 mm.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munin2889
    Could you provide me with a link? I am just curious, I couldn't find that info on the interwebs. So I just went with what the stock fork was. If it truly is 500 mm a2c, then you could potentially put a Fox 130mm as the a2c is right at 500 mm.

    This should be the link.

    http://www.cannondale.com/asset/iu_f...echnote_en.pdf

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by dascro

    Thanks, I only see one problem, that it's not a2c height they are talking about. It's a2c plus the height of the headset. Just something else to take into consideration.


    Edit: typo

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munin2889
    Thanks, I only see one problem, that it's not a2c height they are talking about. It's a2c plus the height of the headset. Just something else to take into consideration.


    Edit: typo

    Right, which is the reason I mentioned around 120mm

    Also take into consideration the bike was designed for a 80-100mm fork. I've run up to 130mm on my 2007 F5(different frame than yours with zero stack headset) and the bike feels best IMO with a high quality 100mm fork.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dascro
    Right, which is the reason I mentioned around 120mm

    Also take into consideration the bike was designed for a 80-100mm fork. I've run up to 130mm on my 2007 F5(different frame than yours with zero stack headset) and the bike feels best IMO with a high quality 100mm fork.
    Not my frame, just trying to help the OP. And seeing how big of a fork they allow tolerances for, I would also agree that a 100mm fork would feel the best.

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