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  1. #1
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    New question here. compression - low & high speed opinions

    just curious to see where everyone set's their compression settings while Dh'ing.

    Assuming you are shuttling at your favorit resort, some rock gardens, some smooth flow lines, drops, dirt table tops....etc.

    I typically run almost zero compression.
    However, I recently upped the high speed to 4 or 5 clicks on my 888, and maybe only 2 for the low speed.
    Feels pretty good, except on the fast rocky sections...feels kind of dead sometimes.

    Any experts want to share their set up? I'd like to further experiment this weekend.

  2. #2
    Mojo0115
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    I would seriously recommend you go through the process of experimenting full compression, zero compression and then move to the middle. It helps you understand when settings need to be changed for your riding conditions.

    I run 3 clicks of low speed and 6 clicks of high speed on my fox 40 as my starting basis.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by zzsean
    I would seriously recommend you go through the process of experimenting full compression, zero compression and then move to the middle. It helps you understand when settings need to be changed for your riding conditions.

    I run 3 clicks of low speed and 6 clicks of high speed on my fox 40 as my starting basis.
    If all of your runs are at high speeds (very little low speed technical), would you need low speed compression at all?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeriderB
    If all of your runs are at high speeds (very little low speed technical), would you need low speed compression at all?
    Ha ha ha ha. Yes, of course. Braking, drops, etc. Those are all influenced by low speed.

  5. #5
    Mojo0115
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeriderB
    If all of your runs are at high speeds (very little low speed technical), would you need low speed compression at all?
    High speed chatter might feel better with no low speed compression, but as Gemini points out you want compression to help with things like Brake Dive and Corners.

    I set my compression to allow maximum speed (for my skill and strength) not necessarily for comfort (even though smooth generally equals fast). So I like some low speed compression for when I dive into a corner. Also DH is very rarely just high speed with very little low speed technical. Here in Colorado we have a lot of high speed sections between the technical sections.

    I am also very far from being an expert here only being a Cat 2 rider, but this works for me and I am still learning every season as I enter my 3rd season of DH racing.

  6. #6
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    On my 40 I run the HS at 4 clicks out from fully engaged and the LS about 10 clicks out. I say out from fully engaged because it varies from fork to fork. Some will have 15, some 17. Its a progressive change as well. Meaning the first 4 clicks out from full will have more of an effect than the last 4.

    Basically I run just enough LS to keep it good in corners. Too much and I find I'll get stuck if I get off a line in a rock garden. Lots of HS is for braking bumps on race runs, those things just kill my hands otherwise.

    I recently got a 888 EVO Ti and haven't got it set the way I like yet. So I'm running my 40 again until I get Marz to get me a Works tune.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeriderB
    If all of your runs are at high speeds (very little low speed technical), would you need low speed compression at all?
    You can be riding fast and still have suspension "events" that generate low shaft speed movements in your suspension. Such as during braking and turning, where your suspension will compress at a slower rate than say during a landing from a drop or through a rockgarden at speed. Thus low speed compression may actually be MOST needed when riding fast...(other factors will play into it however...but as a general rule...), for example to combat brake dive (which will be MORE prominent when braking from speed, than during slower manouvers on technical trails for example).

    Low speed compression can also help you quiet down the bike when jumping lippier jumps, if you find it too "springy" off the lip...by keeping the suspension from compressing too much into the lip, thus having less energy to release as you go airborne (rebound damping also plays an at least equally important role here).

  8. #8
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    Dont be afraid to run WAY more compression my friend.This is exactly why you've spent a lot of cash to get a fancy fork...it's a bit "dumb" ( no offense ) to run almost no compression and rely mostly on a mechanical POGO stick (your spring alone)...Might as well trade that fork for an RST

    From a FOX tech, I was told the factory racers run 11HS and 9 LS out of the trailer and tweak it a little from [email protected] 150, Im runing a sorft spring with 13HS and 9LS...works great for me

    Running MORE compression would allow you to run a softer spring GIVING U MORE TRACTION , better small bump compliances instead of skipping and deflecting off rocks and stuff.

    I'd say run everything right in the middle, see if you get the right sag and if so, back off the HS until you bottom out too much and give it a click or 2.I would proly leave the LS right there if not running more.You want you fork to stay fairly high in its travel to keep you from going OTB.Too much LS would give you a harsh ride to a certain extend....Not running enough would be just as bad as the bike would be too "springy"

    Good dampers are speed sensitive meaning that if you are not in a situation where it requires a lot of compression, the fork will remain smooth and plush, keeping your bike balanced and controlled...but if you hit something hard , load up the G forces or slam on the brakes, the comp. kicks in...keeping you alive.

    You goal is to have a smooth BUT balanced system, not trying to "smoothen"your overall ride...Control is what you seek.

    If you are depending mostly on the spring, the damper cannot do its job properly making the suspension bounce and trying to kick you off the bike instead of sitting low and plowing thru ****.

  9. #9
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    Would these setting recommendations also apply to a Fox 36RC2?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeriderB
    just curious to see where everyone set's their compression settings while Dh'ing.

    Assuming you are shuttling at your favorit resort, some rock gardens, some smooth flow lines, drops, dirt table tops....etc.

    I typically run almost zero compression.
    However, I recently upped the high speed to 4 or 5 clicks on my 888, and maybe only 2 for the low speed.
    Feels pretty good, except on the fast rocky sections...feels kind of dead sometimes.

    Any experts want to share their set up? I'd like to further experiment this weekend.

    What 888 you run? Have no experiance with the 2010 but the previous ones without heavy low speed damping dive like a *****. I run almost all the LSC I could get as the fork felt very uncontrolled without it.

    Also asking for so callled clicks in different forks is silly. 1 click in boxxer is more than 1 click in fox which is more than 1click in older marzo forks so what does that say to you?
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuumbaq
    Running MORE compression would allow you to run a softer spring GIVING U MORE TRACTION , better small bump compliances instead of skipping and deflecting off rocks and stuff.
    Nope. The springrate/preload sets your ride height, and that is all. Being able to run slower damping does not automatically mean that it's a good idea to run a softer spring. In fact, undersprung/overdamped is one of the poorest handling setups you can run.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by norbar
    What 888 you run? Have no experiance with the 2010 but the previous ones without heavy low speed damping dive like a *****. I run almost all the LSC I could get as the fork felt very uncontrolled without it.

    Also asking for so callled clicks in different forks is silly. 1 click in boxxer is more than 1 click in fox which is more than 1click in older marzo forks so what does that say to you?

    it's an 07 RC2x VA.
    My question wasn't relating to exact clicks x-referenced across different brands of forks.
    If posters want to chime in on their boxxer set up, or 40...then that's great...more info for reference.

  13. #13
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    I don't beleive you have high/low speed comp, its just regular compression adjust (bottom of leg) and a "end of stroke" compression adjuster (top of fork).

  14. #14
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    Check out the suspension setup vids on the Fox site under the ProTune area. The information applies to all suspension not just Fox. Specifically check out the 'Bracketing' vid.

  15. #15
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    anyone care to explain compression adjustments

    and the difference between high speed and low speed.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuumbaq
    Dont be afraid to run WAY more compression my friend.This is exactly why you've spent a lot of cash to get a fancy fork...it's a bit "dumb" ( no offense ) to run almost no compression and rely mostly on a mechanical POGO stick (your spring alone)...Might as well trade that fork for an RST

    From a FOX tech, I was told the factory racers run 11HS and 9 LS out of the trailer and tweak it a little from [email protected] 150, Im runing a sorft spring with 13HS and 9LS...works great for me

    Running MORE compression would allow you to run a softer spring GIVING U MORE TRACTION , better small bump compliances instead of skipping and deflecting off rocks and stuff.

    I'd say run everything right in the middle, see if you get the right sag and if so, back off the HS until you bottom out too much and give it a click or 2.I would proly leave the LS right there if not running more.You want you fork to stay fairly high in its travel to keep you from going OTB.Too much LS would give you a harsh ride to a certain extend....Not running enough would be just as bad as the bike would be too "springy"

    Good dampers are speed sensitive meaning that if you are not in a situation where it requires a lot of compression, the fork will remain smooth and plush, keeping your bike balanced and controlled...but if you hit something hard , load up the G forces or slam on the brakes, the comp. kicks in...keeping you alive.

    You goal is to have a smooth BUT balanced system, not trying to "smoothen"your overall ride...Control is what you seek.

    If you are depending mostly on the spring, the damper cannot do its job properly making the suspension bounce and trying to kick you off the bike instead of sitting low and plowing thru ****.
    exactly, some tards in the RC4 thread are tryin to say to run ZERO low speed compression for small rock compliance.... duh.

    i pointed them to your post saying you must be wrong too.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by yakmastermax
    anyone care to explain compression adjustments

    and the difference between high speed and low speed.
    low speed compression is for when the fork is working through slow changes in terrain - like braking, pumping/turning, pedaling, sag, etc.

    high speed compression is when there are QUICK changes in terrain - when you take big drops, hit lips to pop off on jumps, sudden quick forceful movements.

    the more compression you add, the more resistant the fork is to traveling through its available suspension.

    rebound is what controls the rate of your fork returning to fully extended travel. when you ADD rebound, you are adding resistance to the rate at which it travels up - thus "slowing" the fork down.

    when you REMOVE rebound, you are making it easier for the fork to extend back to it's full travel. most people think when you "add" rebound you make the fork faster, it's the exact opposite.

    the low speed rebound and high speed rebound are the same as compression but control the return rate.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeriderB
    it's an 07 RC2x VA.
    My question wasn't relating to exact clicks x-referenced across different brands of forks.
    If posters want to chime in on their boxxer set up, or 40...then that's great...more info for reference.
    Seriously - I had that fork and with no LSC it dives like a sinking uboot. It sure feels plush but the dive killed me.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by norbar
    Seriously - I had that fork and with no LSC it dives like a sinking uboot. It sure feels plush but the dive killed me.
    Seriously - the 07 RC2X does NOT have a LSC adjust. It has compression, rebound and the "x" cart for end of stroke compression.

  21. #21
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    I asked in another thread but will ask in here as its on topic
    I have a lot of hand pain that I thinks from vibration, I would like to mess with my suspension to see if it will make a difference, so to make the bars vibrate less would I add or subtract high speed compression?
    fox vannilla 36 rc2 by the way, I just put everything in the middle when I bought it and have never changed it

    cheers
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  22. #22
    Mojo0115
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee p
    I asked in another thread but will ask in here as its on topic
    I have a lot of hand pain that I thinks from vibration, I would like to mess with my suspension to see if it will make a difference, so to make the bars vibrate less would I add or subtract high speed compression?
    fox vannilla 36 rc2 by the way, I just put everything in the middle when I bought it and have never changed it

    cheers
    Lee
    My experience is that Hand Pain is more often from bad cockpit setup. Have you tried changing your Brake Lever position and angle?

  23. #23
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    this is sharp pain in Knuckles/fingers thats worse if loosely holding bars, not an achey pain at all

    trying not to highjack sorry

  24. #24
    Mojo0115
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee p
    this is sharp pain in Knuckles/fingers thats worse if loosely holding bars, not an achey pain at all

    trying not to highjack sorry
    Definitely sounds like Brake Lever position/angle. To relieve it mess with your lever angles. You can also support the sheath around the tendons with a thin strip of athletic tape the same way that climbers with finger problems tape.

  25. #25
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    good idea with the tape cheers
    what the rule of thumb with lever angle?
    I have them well inboard for one finger and reach as far in as poss

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee p
    I asked in another thread but will ask in here as its on topic
    I have a lot of hand pain that I thinks from vibration, I would like to mess with my suspension to see if it will make a difference, so to make the bars vibrate less would I add or subtract high speed compression?
    fox vannilla 36 rc2 by the way, I just put everything in the middle when I bought it and have never changed it

    cheers
    Lee

    in the few times that I played with HSC this past weekend, I noticed too much (+) created additional vibration felt through the bars.

    I would say try backing the HSC off a couple of clicks.

  27. #27
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    If a fork only has rebound and compression (05 888 rc) what does the compression change in terms of high and low speed?

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by freeriderB
    in the few times that I played with HSC this past weekend, I noticed too much (+) created additional vibration felt through the bars.

    I would say try backing the HSC off a couple of clicks.
    ok man.

    Download THIS

    Go to page 69, read section 5.3.2.

    There is no HSC on the RC2X, you are playing just a regular compression adjustment. If your twiddling the compression knob on the top caps, you won't even feel any changes till you get to the last 1.5" of travel or so...

    I have the same fork, I run it with minimal compression, and a little more end of stroke comp, and fairly fast rebound. Ie the thing is plush, gobles up rocks like crazy, wheel is glued to the ground the end of stroke handles drops with grace (no bottom out).

    It does dive under brakes, but nothing adjusting rider position doesn't fix.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpculp
    If a fork only has rebound and compression (05 888 rc) what does the compression change in terms of high and low speed?
    it doesn't differentiate between the two.

    The benefit of seperate adjustments is that for low speed stuff like your front diving under brakes or compressing in a berm can be reduced by having lots of damping when the fork only wants to move a little bit.

    Then you have a different circuit for when the fork wants to move quickly, like a sharp bump, drop jump etc, here you adjust so that you have controlled movement, to much high speed damping and it will be a harsh ride, to little and the suspension will be more likely to bottom out on bigger hits.

    If you only have compression adjustment then you have to choose your evil, brake dive and plush, or no brake dive and harsh chattery ride with a chance of loosing traction. I choose plush.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by essenmeinstuff
    Seriously - the 07 RC2X does NOT have a LSC adjust. It has compression, rebound and the "x" cart for end of stroke compression.


    So if it does not have lsc adjust or hsc adjust that means that it changes some magical mumbo jumbo compression that has no influence on riding? Turning the lower knob still works similar to LSC - lessens the dive and makes the fork more damped while compressing. Mainly at lower speed hits. In theory it does not have lsc but you have to work with what you have and it kinda works.
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