Changing a wire bead tire?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Gangbusters
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    Changing a wire bead tire?

    What's the trick? I have dt swiss FR 6.1d wheelset, trying to take off a set of wire bead nevegals (DH)....f* hard as hell...after 1 hour and plenty of talc, i ended up cutting it of (and the tube, which WAS still good) with wire cutters. ****! I still need to put on a new set....Ohh and i broke 2 tire levers.....there must be a better way? Also could i run a 2.35 tube in a 2.5 dh wire bead tire?

  2. #2
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    heavy duty tyre levers,there are some with steel inserts but still plastic coated to protect your rims.

    and running a smaller innertube will be ok just it will stretch a bit more than it should.

  3. #3
    General Rabble-Rouser
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    I carry a 1 12" metal tire lever (wrap the tip in hockey tape to save rims) and 3 plastic park levers. I use the metal lever to break the bead, and hook it against the disc, then slip the park levers in and slowly work off the bead.

    To give you credit, I have never had a worse bead than a Nevegal. Thems be tiiiight

  4. #4
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    get the tire wet with some soapy water, it will come off with one hand and no tools. easier than a prom dress...


  5. #5
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    I own the same wheelset, so I can feel your pain... every tyre change is a small nightmare with these rims.
    I broke almost every plastic lever there is out there, the only ones that do the trick for me are pedros heavy duty downhill levers - the problem is they can damage the paint & the rim itself unless they ' re used carefully...

  6. #6
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    combo of both is best, soak it up with some soapy water, use some heavier duty tire levers the soap will assist you sliding the bead off the rim.

  7. #7
    Look at the time!
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    one important thing that a lot of people seem to forget:
    push the tire into the center of the rim first. The center of the rim has a smaller diameter, so the tire will now be much looser, giving you a lot more room to pull it over the edge of the rim.

    Some tire/rim combinations are tighter than others, but you should never need to cut the tire.
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  8. #8
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    geeez some of you people are a bunch of babies.
    One steel 6" long lever or a plastic coated steel and one plastic lever will work. I have never had an issue with his setup.
    Hell I have replaced the small plastic lever with a screw driver for the past 5 months with zero problems or flats.

    YOu need to use your head not your muscles.

  9. #9
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    There's no doubt the DH 2.5 Nevegals are a b---h to get on and off. I never had a problem getting them off, but I always had issues trailside getting a new tube in there without putting a hole in the tube. (Compared to other tires.) Great tire, lousy bead.

    I've been wanting to try this tire again on my 823s tubeless. Hmmmm

    P.S. I'm not a baby!
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  10. #10
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    I use my thumbs. I own that wheelset and have taken many wire bead nevegals, as well as some intense triple ply sidewall tires on and off with no tire levers. technique is where it's at.

    but if you are fine with marring your rim and possibly pinching a tube during install, I like the pedro's yellow plastic tire levers as well as one intense metal tire lever. haven't had a use for them in a looong time but they work if needed.
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  11. #11
    Meh.
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    I think it's your technique. Start opposite the valve stem, push the bead into the center channel and work off one side completely, then start on the opposite side.

  12. #12
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    you can't be married --- your fingers become a lot stronger a few years after being married.


    &

    sometimes, some tires on some wheels are just a beyatch to get on and off.

    For the really tough ones, we use the Billy BaRoo Park Tool levers (steel) # TL-5's.

    On my left hand, l only have half a thumb and l can get tires off and on pretty much any wheel --- but then again, l have been married for more than 10 years.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker.
    get the tire wet with some soapy water, it will come off with one hand and no tools. easier than a prom dress...

    never underestimate the power of soapy water......it works wonders
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    never underestimate the power of soapy water......it works wonders

    You've got the soapy water and effects of sitting your 300lbs on a tire confused
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  15. #15
    Gangbusters
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    is the soapy water bad for the tube? isn't soap basic (pH) or does the water lower the concentration?

  16. #16
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    I've never had to use soapy water in my life for any dual ply. Since you're running sh*t Kendas just cut them off with a razor blade and use them for a chainstay guard or something. If you do want to keep them for some reason, unstead the bead on BOTH sides, hold the wheel upright with the valve stem at the bottom and compress the tire at the valve stem, and usually you can just whip the tire right off with one easy circular motion of a plastic lever with the steel inserts. The tire should have stretched out quite a bit if it had been used for a while too.

    SMT your jizz does NOT have the same effect as soapy water even if they appear the same. You need to spend less time around your bikes.
    805

  17. #17
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    Soapy water really helps. It's funny though, I struggled getting my maxxis minions on my mavic 729 rims because I was using plastic levers... When I was home I took out the dirtbike levers 12"-18" and it took very little effort.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuksul08
    Soapy water really helps. It's funny though, I struggled getting my maxxis minions on my mavic 729 rims because I was using plastic levers... When I was home I took out the dirtbike levers 12"-18" and it took very little effort.

    Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.

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  19. #19
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    Keep metal levers away from your MTB rims if you don't want them to develop burrs and puncture flat at the worst possible times - like in a corner when the tire is being pushed to that side of the rim.
    805

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by DHidiot
    Keep metal levers away from your MTB rims if you don't want them to develop burrs and puncture flat at the worst possible times - like in a corner when the tire is being pushed to that side of the rim.

    indeed. Raw metal levers can wratch rims pretty fast. Wrapping the ends with some hockey tape though fixes that problem

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DHidiot
    Keep metal levers away from your MTB rims if you don't want them to develop burrs and puncture flat at the worst possible times - like in a corner when the tire is being pushed to that side of the rim.
    If you get good ones with a nicely shaped end that are very smooth then it shouldn't be a problem. For the average person though, I agree plastic is foolproof
    We can bomb the world to pieces, but we can't bomb it into peace -Michael Franti

  22. #22
    Mountain Lion Bait
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    I've always had good luck using copious amounts of talculm powder to get tires off and on rims. Soapy water sounds like a good idear too.

  23. #23
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    Well, you've got possibly the hardest rim to mount and remove tires on and the hardest tire to mount and remove, I feel your hurt. As others have said, getting the opposite side bead of that you are working on into that groove in the rim is key. Use a couple of metal cored plastic tire levers spaced about 3"-4" apart to lift part of the bead over the lip of the rim and hook them onto the spokes. At that point you might be able to roll the bead off by standing over the rim, grabbing the tire and forcefully pushing/rolling it off the rim. This works for me but I've got "dad grip". If not you've got to use another lever to work the bead off. Soapy water or talc will be useful if not necessary.

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