Canfield pedals slippery when wet.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Canfield pedals slippery when wet.

    I had a chance to try the new canfield pedals in the mud a while ago and was surprised by how little grip they had.Then I compared them to the "ordinary platforms" people were riding and they were far less grippy.

  2. #2
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    well im sure the convex platform makes it even worse. good to know, thanks.

  3. #3
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    i have them and have used them quite a few times in the rain and mud. try different shoes cause i have never slipped a pedal to date.

  4. #4
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    I have only ridden downhill in the dry with them once. They are about as grippy as normal pedals, and I am tempted to say even a little less. But it's not to the point of me even seeing it be a problem. It is probably due to them not being concave at all in the middle.

  5. #5
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    Since getting the canfield pedals i haven't slipped a pedal yet. there are a ton of pins and they are skinnier than most so they really stick into your shoes.

    5.10s and canfield pedals are an amazing combo.

    the cool things about the pedals though is if your foot does slip a little atleast your weight is pretty even with the axle so the pedal doesn't have the tendency to try to spin out from under your foot like fatter pedals do.

    I have 2 sets. i have used them on dh, 5 hour xc, dj's, and everything inbetween.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by climbingbubba
    Since getting the canfield pedals i haven't slipped a pedal yet. there are a ton of pins and they are skinnier than most so they really stick into your shoes.

    5.10s and canfield pedals are an amazing combo.
    Agreed Running Canfield pedals with Rennie 5.10s and they are amazing. I have ridden them in the rain,snow, and mud, but again no issues here in 5.10s.

    Getting two more sets of Canfield pedals for my other two bikes. Once I have ridden these pedals I can no longer ride any other flat pedal on the market. I do like like some bling'd out Twenty6 TI pedals (which I have never ridden they just look cool) but for the cost I will pass and rip the hell out of the crampons all day long

  7. #7
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    running 5.10s with literally any pedal is amazing.

    i was only on the canfields for a little while, and honestly wasn't that impressed. i find that canfield owners feel they're the best in the world and everyone else just says eh...i'd personally get deitys and save a ton of money

  8. #8
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    I wear 5. 10's with those pedals too. They are not THAT great. Not $150's worth of greatness. They do have a unique feel to them for sure, and the few people that have tried them on my bike say that too. I had deity's before. They are reliable and are like $70.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by nmpearson
    running 5.10s with literally any pedal is amazing.
    Not really I was not impressed with my 5.10 and 50/50 set up. I would never ride 50/50s again even if they were free.

    Quote Originally Posted by nmpearson
    i find that canfield owners feel they're the best in the world and everyone else just says eh...
    Yes I would agree with you I feel the Jedi is the best DH bike in the world that's why I own one. Just like I am sure the Transition, Turner, and the Specialized (etc) boys feel like there bikes are the best. So what would you expect from someone who likes there pedals (bike or product). They will prob say they are the best or one of the best, that's why they are using them (in most cases).

    I could own any pedal I want but the crampon pedals just do everything I need to and them some. I have ridden over 8 diff styles of flats from high end to low end with all types of pricing but again crampon just fits the bill just fine for me. So if it isn't broke..., well you know the rest.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by nmpearson
    running 5.10s with literally any pedal is amazing.

    i was only on the canfields for a little while, and honestly wasn't that impressed. i find that canfield owners feel they're the best in the world and everyone else just says eh...i'd personally get deitys and save a ton of money
    Really? I know 4 people who have immediately ordered sets after riding mine. One of them ordered two sets.

    As far as concavity goes, they're concave right left, like putting your foot on a pringle, it actually feels pretty good. I find my feet slip around way less then they do on any other pedal I've ever tried, (they replaced a set of syncros mental mags, so let nobody say I don't appreciate grippy pedals). Haven't ridden them in the wet yet though, so no comment there, if they're bad I'll just throw on the syncros.

  11. #11
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    as far as people thinking that it'll feel odd on your foot because it's concave...totally untrue. they felt flat to me. i just wasn't impressed, and the other 5 people that felt them at the same time felt the same that like we'd ride them if they were free for sure, but paying 150 for that pedal wouldn't happen

  12. #12
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    I had problems with grip as well, even running 5.10's. I compared them to my Premium Slim's and noticed that those pedals only use pins on the outer corners whereas the Crampons have 3 pins (front and back edges). I removed the center pins and now they grip just as well as any of my pedals. Plus I shaved off a whole fraction of a gram
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by nmpearson
    i find that canfield owners feel they're the best in the world and everyone else just says eh...

    i just wasn't impressed, and the other 5 people that felt them at the same time felt the same that like we'd ride them if they were free for sure, but paying 150 for that pedal wouldn't happen

    Troll much? You don't like them other people do, carry on.

  14. #14
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    I do think that the parking lot test is not a good true test. They took me a little bit to get used to them because im coming from concave pedals. At first because they are not concave the even gave me the feeling they wouldn't grip as well. The only good test is to go out and ride. I have ridden them hard from day one. i went and picked them up from their house the day they got them. Again i have never slipped a pedal yet.

    on a side note, people complain about feeling the side knob on the pedals but after getting used to them and putting corsair flat pedals on my DJ for a while i found it hard to find where to put my foot. The bulge on canfields helps you to know exactly where to put your feet and you know they are on their good too. the bulge seems to stop your foot from sliding side to side.

    I guess it all depends on personal preference on this one. some people will dig them and some won't

  15. #15

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    fanboy's love em. I didnt think they were very grippy

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccspecialized
    Troll much? You don't like them other people do, carry on.
    it was just my opinion and i'm one of the limited amount that's been on them. I do feel though that a parking lot test is adequate for pedals. You know immediately whether or not pedals are grippy enough.

    i'm not hating on the canfield pedals, i just don't feel they're worth it and they weren't as grippy and i initially thought they would be. i'm also the same person that wouldn't spend 270 on the twenty6 pedals though.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nmpearson
    it was just my opinion and i'm one of the limited amount that's been on them. I do feel though that a parking lot test is adequate for pedals. You know immediately whether or not pedals are grippy enough.

    i'm not hating on the canfield pedals, i just don't feel they're worth it and they weren't as grippy and i initially thought they would be. i'm also the same person that wouldn't spend 270 on the twenty6 pedals though.
    That is an interesting observation. I disagree, because the whole point of these pedals is to be more stable, and you can't really get a feel for that without testing stability through getting bounced around in rocks. Its getting bounced around that these pedals really shine.

    Once you place your foot, it stays there unless you want it to move, completely unlike every other pedal I've ever tried - I've tried pedals where your foot stays there no matter what (didn't like em, all the problems of clipless without the benefits), and some pedals you relax the grip by removing pins so you can mash your foot around on it, but then they get jostled around the second you hit rocks. This is the first (and only, so far, although I'd love to try the flypapers) pedal I've ridden that I can move my foot around, but that don't let my feet get jostled around.

    Again, no idea how they'll ride in the wet, and if they suck, its ok, I've got another set of world class b1tchin pedals on standby ready to replace them if they do. I'll post it up here once I get a chance to shred in the rain and voice my opinion.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by William42
    That is an interesting observation. I disagree, because the whole point of these pedals is to be more stable, and you can't really get a feel for that without testing stability through getting bounced around in rocks. Its getting bounced around that these pedals really shine.

    Once you place your foot, it stays there unless you want it to move, completely unlike every other pedal I've ever tried - I've tried pedals where your foot stays there no matter what (didn't like em, all the problems of clipless without the benefits), and some pedals you relax the grip by removing pins so you can mash your foot around on it, but then they get jostled around the second you hit rocks. This is the first (and only, so far, although I'd love to try the flypapers) pedal I've ridden that I can move my foot around, but that don't let my feet get jostled around.
    i see where you're coming from. it was nice how large the platform was and how your foot sits. I guess i'd look at it if i were constantly bashing my deitys. i guess how stability works, i'm 6'2 210 with sz 12 foot, and am fine running like deitys, atomlab gi du, and other similarly large pedals. i do have to give them credit, it's def the best engineered pedal on the market

  19. #19
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    Why are all these people not knowing where there foot is. I know where my foot is at without a big buldge telling me......

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