Can somone school me real quick on DH wheels?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Big Hittin'
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    Can somone school me real quick on DH wheels?

    Whatsup,

    I'm a bit confused on the wheel specs i need for my bike.

    i thinking about getting a set of Azonic Outlaws for my 11' Big Hit 2. i put the specs below.

    so what wheels do i need? Im running a boxxer fork. no quick release front or back.

    Specialized Bicycle Components : BigHit II

    135mm or 150mm? anything else i need to know?

    Specialized Bicycle Components : BigHit II

    Azonic Outlaw Wheelset > Components > Wheel Goods > Mountain Bike Wheels | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop
    29er's are Goofy

  2. #2
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    Azonics have interchangable hubs. You need a 20mm front and 135mm rear. I'm not sure if the 12mm axle that come with the Azonics will fit in the drop outs. I ran a 10mm step down on my 09 BH. Someone else might know if the 12mm fits but if not Azonic sell the step down axle.

  3. #3
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    The Jenson link you posted says "all parts included" for the 12mm to QR switch. It looks like your frame is 135x9mm, or standard quick release dropouts. Without seeing the bike or dropout, it's really hard to tell, but it's a safe bet that if your frame has dropouts and not a through axle, it's 9mm QR. The front hub is easily convertible, but 20mm will fit.

    Maybe measure the axle that comes out of your current hubs? If it's removable, just grab some calipers or a ruler and measure the diameter.

  4. #4
    Big Hittin'
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    My rear doesn't have a QR. it's a tool removal system. It needs to be removed with a hex key.

    I think the axel does come out if I loosen both sides. If it does am I all good?
    29er's are Goofy

  5. #5
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    It's a pretty vague description on the Specialized website as to what rear hub came on your bike. It does say that the rear end is asymetrical. On a BigHit that usually means that a stock built wheel won't sit centered. It will need to be dished correctly for your bike.
    Can't keep track anymore - Giant, Santa Cruz, Pivot, Yeti, Norco, Salsa, Intense - if it rolls on dirt I like it :thumbsup:

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by nokfir2 View Post
    My rear doesn't have a QR. it's a tool removal system. It needs to be removed with a hex key.

    I think the axel does come out if I loosen both sides. If it does am I all good?
    is it one long bolt that pulls out to the non-drive side? measure that bolt, #1, and #2, see if the axle "slots in" to the drop-outs, or if it just hovers there. A true through-axle doesn't actually rest on anything, a QR axle rests in two little "pockets".

    It may be worth taking it to an LBS for an investigation. Otherwise you're going to have to post some photos. It would suck to buy a wheelset and have to pay to ship it back if it doesn't fit. It should be easy enough to tell whether it's dished to the side by eye from above, and a closeup of the dropout area may tell your axle story.

  7. #7
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    Big Hit

    I took a look @ the manual
    http://service.specialized.com/colla...FSR-Manual.pdf

    The rear is 135 x 10mm bolt-through

    If you need a 12mm to 10mm step down you can get one here

    Atomic Laboratories 2012
    Last edited by ssalinas; 05-01-2012 at 08:21 AM.

  8. #8
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    Azonic Momentum Axle 12mm X 135mm at Price Point

    pyoop. Still worth checking the dish. "assymetric" rear ends sometimes refer to chainstay setup, but it's worth checking on. Outlaw wheels may be able to be dished over. I had a BMW racelink that used a zero dish wheel with a floater setup, and I was able to true a standard wheel to fit inside the rear triangle.

  9. #9
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    I was behind a guy in the dual slalom pracitce line at sea otter who was running stock Outlaws on his specialized SX (which also has an asymmetrical rear end for a dishless rear wheel). The offset is 6mm on an SX. It was really obvious that the rear wheel was skewed to the side. This may or may not be the same amount of offset for a Big Hit. If you do this right, you get a chance to build up a 135 mm rear wheel with zero or very little dish (depending on the hub dimensions), and that means ~100%/100% relative spoke tensions left/right, which means a stronger wheel. I was able to detension, undish, and retension an off-the-shelf WTB laserdisc trail wheel over to 6mm offset for my SX, but if I ever build up a wheel specifically for this bike it would be on a hub I could get perfectly even tension. You use a tool like Freespoke to figure this all out.
    Good luck.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssalinas View Post
    I took a look @ the manual
    http://service.specialized.com/colla...FSR-Manual.pdf

    The rear is 135 x 10mm bolt-through

    If you need a 12mm to 10mm step down you can get one here

    Atomic Laboratories 2012
    thanks, so all i need is that 12mm to 10mm converter and i should be good right.
    29er's are Goofy

  11. #11
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    It sounds like you'll also have the wheel trued over to reduce the dish. It may be wiser to custom build a wheel or you may be able to do it yourself/have a shop do it.

  12. #12
    Living the High Life
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    Just for reference a 10mm through is the same as a rear QR. The 9mm QR is actually the front diameter. A 10mm through axle will fit in a QR rear. The skewers are the same size because it's the hub that actually sits in the frame on a QR. No big deal really as no one makes a 9mm through rear or a 10mm front.

    I ran a 10mm through axle on a Specialzed Enduro, Astrix Huckster and Commencal Meta6, all QR rear.

  13. #13
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    I always get those mixed up.

  14. #14
    Big Hittin'
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    Sorry if i sound stupid. im bad at the tech stuff (when it comes to bikes)

    can you explain real quick (like explaining to a 5 year old) why it would have to be "trued" or "dished"?

    also im not sure what "dished" means.

    thanks for the help so far.
    29er's are Goofy

  15. #15
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    "dish" is essentially offset. So, your rim is offset to one side or the other. On a standard wheel, the tire/rim is offset to the drive side so that, when it's inserted into the dropout, the tire/rim is centered in the frame and over the full width of the hub. Most bikes are like that.

    It sounds like your bike is asymmetrical, and uses a 'dishless' wheel. What that means is that there is no offset to the tire/rim from the hub flanges. It builds into a stronger wheel, since both spoke sides are the same length, but you still have the cogset/freewheel sticking out on one half, which your wheel doesn't compensate for.

    The problem here is that outlaw wheels are dished for standard bikes, and your bike wants 'less' offset, so when you put the outlaw wheel in your dropouts, your tire might rub on the drive side chainstay. You can take a spoke wrench and tighten the non-drive side nipples, then loosen the driveside nips, to slowly 'pull' the rim over to the non-drive side. The problem with this is that you may not have a lot of room, and you don't want to lose too much threading on the spokes as it moves over.

    As I mentioned before, I have done this myself on a wheel that was dished for a normal bike. I pulled the rim over enough to clear the chainstays on my bike (it had a floater and used a non-dished wheel like yours). It rode fine for a season or so, and I'm not really a mechanic. I used the bike itself as a truing stand. You may want to have a shop do it so you don't have to worry about it, but then the cost goes up...

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