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  1. #1
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    Back to full dh rig?

    Last spring I sold the Jedi and firebird to get a new firebird that I rode as my only bike locally and at the bike parks. It worked really well at whistler but missed the full dh a little on trails like In Deep. So looking at another dh rig and leaning toward a Phoenix as I have liked my firebirds, and the yt tues. I'm looking at carbon with probably the available lower end builds. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I have a thought, but I'm not sure if you're going to like it.

    I've had aluminum frames most of my life with the exception of 3 steel and 2 carbon. Carbon is the newest hype by the industry to up their sales. The latest carbon frame I own is a 2017. It weighs close to the aluminum model, if not the same. For an extra $1000? That money could be used on the more important parts such as suspension, brakes or wheels. Remember, aluminum frames were around for decades and lasted. Don't think that it's all of a sudden a cheap material that will fail.

    Also, because the industry is pushing carbon, I've noticed some aluminum frame are now sub $2000 that used to be well over that price.

    The Tues will be less expensive than the Firebird (I would think) and the aluminum would be a lot less expensive too. Which all means a good savings to upgrade a lot of stuff.

    For example - Get the cheap fork upgraded by Avalanche racing and you'll have a fork that's better than a high end factory fork. And cost less.

    Ttyl, Fahn
    Hubbard Bike Club

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFahn View Post
    For an extra $1000? That money could be used on the more important parts such as suspension, brakes or wheels.
    ^This right here. For the same $, I'd take an AL DH bike with better suspension over a Carbon frame with lower end suspension any day.
    No dig no whine

  4. #4
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    Find with minimal chain growth so you can run a stupid long chain for a stupid big cassette... or you could possibly rig up a dummy idler pully if you have a seat tube that can clamp on one of those chain guides and replace that with a jockey wheel

  5. #5
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    Was thinking about going back to aluminum. Two things that come to mind, first is that complete builds seem to be more economical and second is that carbon frames seem to be better equipped than al. Still undecided so appreciate the comments so far.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by twd953 View Post
    ^This right here. For the same $, I'd take an AL DH bike with better suspension over a Carbon frame with lower end suspension any day.
    I agree with this, if it's "which one would you rather ride". But to play devil's advocate - it's a lot easier to upgrade a fork later on than it is to upgrade to a carbon frame. If I'm buying new, I'd rather have a great frame with serviceable parts that I can upgrade down the road.

    There are tons of fantastic options out there either way you go these days so there's really no wrong decision. I've ridden both the AL and CF Tues pretty hard and I have nothing bad to say about either - they are really great bikes.
    Trail: Scalpel-Si / Sherpa / Fatboy
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    "Aah the great indoors - No One Ever"

  7. #7
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    For gravity which almost every bit of every shuttle or lift served trail I ride is, I find a little bit of extra weight much smoother nicer and more comfortable, with only a few exceptions. I suppose if you are really good and like to shred up lightning quick transitions, a light bike will be better. But for the roots and rocks where I ride, and my skill level (novice-intermediate), I donít know if I could get any benefit from carbon. I have carbon enduro which is much lighter, not as nice in roots and rock gardens, but obviously much better for rides with climbs, and well groomed jump parks where I can firm up the shock and make it more like a dirt jumper.

    HTH

    -Peter

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hel Mot View Post
    Was thinking about going back to aluminum. Two things that come to mind, first is that complete builds seem to be more economical and second is that carbon frames seem to be better equipped than al. Still undecided so appreciate the comments so far.
    Some more things to consider -

    A drivetrain gets pretty beat up. My Zee derailleur and shifter cost $60 combined. It shifts perfectly for 4 years now and I even purchased backups of both of them. That's still cheaper than a high end derailleur. The cassette is a 105 or Ultegra and cost $60 I think. The money saved there alone could be enough to get a rear shock tuned by Avalanche.

    Seat, seatpost, bar, stem, chainring and some other stuff really doesn't need to be super high end.

    Suspension, wheels, and brakes do.

    Sell your OEM brakes and throw in a couple hundred for an upgrade. Strong rims are important too. But a cheap front hub consist of a hub shell, sealed bearings and end caps that's generally no different than a Hope, Hadley or King. I've had 2 of those 3 listed and a cheap Origin 8. There's not much difference.

    The rear hub? Do you WANT or NEED a high end hub? Not really, but you can if you'd like. My DT is 12 years old and still perfect (with annual maintenance).

    Spend $400 on a fork tune and you'll have a great bike for less than you would have spent on a downgraded carbon bike.

    Ttyl, Fahn
    Hubbard Bike Club

  9. #9
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    The bit of extra weight on an aluminum DH frame is a non-issue IMO. I could be on a carbon DH rig if I wanted, but am completely thrilled on my 2015 aluminum frame - that's still going strong. There will come a time where I'll likely have to pull and replace the bearings. I feel better doing that on an aluminum frame.

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