Anyone running a Fox 36 VAN??- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Anyone running a Fox 36 VAN??

    Hi,

    I have an 06 Enduro and currently have the 06 Fox 36 Talas R. I'm a bigger guy ~230lbs and don't like the brake dive and lack of compression settings on the fork. I'm thinking of going with the Fox 36 VAN RC2.

    Anyone have experience with this fork? I've heard it bottoms out, but I'd prolly go with the firmer springs.
    "If an illegal alien is an undocumented immigrant, than a drug dealer is an unlicensed pharmicist."

  2. #2
    Bikes Rule
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    The Van RC2 is awesome. Totally sucks up the small bumps and works perfectly on the huge hits. I have one on my Bottlerocket. I love it. It is perfect for the type of FR/Slopestyle riding I do.

  3. #3
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    Is the Van R nearly as good as the RC2?

  4. #4
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    I've been looking as well... had a Vanlla rlc and F100rlc quite a few years ago, and I never messed with any of the stuff that much after initial set-up, so, I think the "R" is good enough for me, assuming it comes from the factory with decent compression settings...

    Demo-9, if you don't mind me asking, how much do you weigh with your gear, and which springs do you have in the fork?
    Schralp it Heavy.

  5. #5
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    Mine works great for long no foot stoppies.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mace2
    Is the Van R nearly as good as the RC2?
    As in the Marz 66 RC2X?

    Comparing these two forks is like comparing a repainted yugo to a dune-buggy.

    The Van sucks compared to the 66.

    In fact, most of the 20mm thru axle stuff from fox sucks (except the 40, if you can keep from breaking it).

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullit71
    Hi,

    I have an 06 Enduro and currently have the 06 Fox 36 Talas R. I'm a bigger guy ~230lbs and don't like the brake dive and lack of compression settings on the fork. I'm thinking of going with the Fox 36 VAN RC2.

    Anyone have experience with this fork? I've heard it bottoms out, but I'd prolly go with the firmer springs.
    Get a Marz 66SL. You can tune it perfectly for a heavier rider.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndecentExposure
    As in the Marz 66 RC2X?

    Comparing these two forks is like comparing a repainted yugo to a dune-buggy.

    The Van sucks compared to the 66.

    In fact, most of the 20mm thru axle stuff from fox sucks (except the 40, if you can keep from breaking it).
    what are these opinions of yours even based on??? Nothing against Marz, as I have some of their products and like them, but why the bias?
    I'm pretty sure he was talking about the Fox 36VAN RC2 anyway.
    Schralp it Heavy.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndecentExposure
    As in the Marz 66 RC2X?

    Comparing these two forks is like comparing a repainted yugo to a dune-buggy.

    The Van sucks compared to the 66.

    In fact, most of the 20mm thru axle stuff from fox sucks (except the 40, if you can keep from breaking it).
    Haha.. Stick to your beach cruiser as$ clown.
    Last edited by zachdank; 11-09-2006 at 12:02 AM.

  10. #10
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    Yes I was asking about the Van R versus the Van RC2.

    Are they the same except the RC2 has external adjustments?
    i.e. once they're set up, they'll perform identically?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mace2
    Yes I was asking about the Van R versus the Van RC2.

    Are they the same except the RC2 has external adjustments?
    i.e. once they're set up, they'll perform identically?
    well, the RC2 has high and low speed compression settings externally. I think the R just straight up doesn't have those adjustments, but don't quote me, I could be wrong... maybe internal?
    but, probably won't perform EXACTLY "identical" but who cares... I think the "R" is even a tad lighter.
    Schralp it Heavy.

  12. #12
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    In my experience it's a really good thing to get the RC2 version of both the 36 Talas or the 36 Van.Those things are so linear (especially Talas), you really need those compression adjustments.Especially if you're doing drops&stuff.
    By the way, I have a 36 Van RC2 and I could bottom the fork easily with full open compression.After adjusting it it only bottomed once, and it was 6ft to almost flat so that's ok by me.

    I haven't ridden the 66 extensivelly, so I cannot compare.

    Marko

  13. #13
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    Mmmm. I've had and sold my 36 TALAS RC2 because I blew the rebound adjuster on day one and didn't think much of the travel adjust feature compared to others I've tried.

    I still run the 36 Vanilla RC2 on my SX Trail and have broken the the rebound cartridge on that after one weeks riding and cracked the lowers a month later by apparently over tightening the pinch bolts (which I didn't by the way!). All fixed under waranty but it meant not having my for to ride with for a few weeks.

    So if you want my opinion I would not buy a Fox 36 again, I would definitely go with the Marzocchi 66RC2x or Totem. I now run a 888RC2X on my DH bike and absolutely love it. Reasonable weight, awesome tunability, realistic price and looks cool too. I weigh 88kg if that matters.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeSATORI

    Demo-9, if you don't mind me asking, how much do you weigh with your gear, and which springs do you have in the fork?
    I think that is a bit personal...LOL

    Just kidding. I weigh about 180 and riding gear maybe another 5-10 or so (no backpacks). The RC2 version has externally adjustable High/Low Speed Compression as the difference over the R. I ride the firm spring. Once you set up the spring, rebound and compression you then have the option to set the hi/lo as you need.

    For me I needed the extra adjustments to fine tune to the Bottlerocket rear shock. Plus I switch from super huck days to more XC oriented rides. Having the ability to dial the fork in without having to mess with springs and oil is a benefit for me.

    My buddy has the R and he is 6' 2" and about 230 with gear. He loves the fork as well and would like to upgrade to the RC2 if he could. He had the fork on a hardtail, but now has it on his fully. With the full suspension, having the hi/lo really makes a difference to fine tune. The RC2 is not really needed for a hardtail IMO.

    I built the bike specifically for Highland Mountain Bike park which has a few 10+ foot drops (to trannys). I bottom the fork once in a great while, but usually on the big to flat stuff. Overall the fork is awesome. Adjustable, not too bad for weight, stiff and has no issues..

  15. #15
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    they are sick forks for sure dude... get one.. you'd love it! i just rode one this past weekend on a santa cruz nomad... it felt great to me! i didn't bottom it out at all and i was trying, but then again i weight about 142 pounds when wearing xc gear.
    "dropped outta school. no G.E.D. but in these streets i'm a G.O.D."
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  16. #16
    AussieLostInNyc
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    I have one on my SX Trail. Nice fork, love it except I cannont get the sag set properly.
    No problem I like it firm and it soaks up the little bumps well enough.
    It came stock with a blue spring which is no good for me. 190 -195 with gear on.
    I put in the next spring up which is rated for riders up to 210lb.
    Still bottom out a bit at Diablo on the porch drop and doms (8 - 10' stuff) but its not to bad.
    I have the next spring as well for 205 -240+lb but I think if I put that in I would loose to much small bump plushness.
    The fork is adjustable and I am still dialing it it. A few clicks this way a few that way.

    Would love to know what weight springs and settings others are running in the same weight bracket as me.
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  17. #17
    lidless ascender
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    Well, I'm nowhere near your weight (around 150 lbs with gear, which puts me right between the purple and the blue spring), but I'm happy with the stock blue spring (150-180lbs) and get the correct sag with it, 34mm or a little less than 22%.
    You need to measure sag in your normal riding position, which usually means standing up over the bike, not sitting.It's also good to cycle the suspension when in the right riding position so to eliminate all stiction which might occur by a slack head tube angle.You need to reposition the ziptie after that, of course.

    Marko

  18. #18
    Takin'er easy
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    The Van R just has one compression adjustment (spring preload) on the left top-cap. The RC2 has 2 compression adjustments (high speed and low speed) accessable through either the spring preload on the left top-cap, or the high speed compression adjustment on the bottom of the left leg. In my opinion, more adjustment is better if cost is not an issue.

    I am about 180lbs, and I have run the 36 Van R on my Yeti ASX, which I use for both trail riding and DH. From what I have found, the damper rod in the Van R is good for about 20-30 hard DH runs, but works great as a trail fork. Another guy I ride with (who is the same weight and on a similar bike) runs the VAN RC2, and has raced DH with it and had no problems. However, he is a much smoother rider than I am, never crashes, and has no scratches or dents on the lowers of his fork.

    Bottom line: if cost is not an issue, buy the RC2 and get some stiffer springs. Run as little pre-load as you can, and tune the high speed compression to the given trail. If you have problems with the fork, Fox will take care of you. It may take three weeks, but that is why we have spare bikes, right?

  19. #19
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    RC2 is the key. I'm no suspension wizard. But, I dialed this thing in through trial and error. I was having problem w/ a G out. I dialed up the Hi and it was obvious. Low speed could use a bit more adjustment range but that is splitting atoms. Makes you wonder why rear shocks aren't RC2 like the Avalanche Hi/Low system (which I may get next season). Simple enough and it works. I wish Push would modify the DHX for hi/low.

    As far as Marzocchi goes. I was all about them until I rode the VAN-RC2. No air preload BS. No problems at all actually. The right Coils and some Oil is all a VAN need then just ride.
    (this excludes 888 and >05 66 forks which I have no time on)
    All about the ride

  20. #20
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    The problem with the fox shoxs is that you can't adjust the progressiveness, and if you want to keep them from bottoming you have two realistic options, either get stiffer springs (harsher ride) or use more compression damping (harsher ride). The only way to preserve a supple active ride and get bottom out resistance is progressiveness, and you can easily adjust this on just about any marzocchi. This is an important adjustment when you have riders that weigh the same, but ride differently. You can get the "bottom out" adjusted with some fox forks if you send them back to fox, but this won't affect the overall rate of the fork, just the very end of travel, and it's only like 3 different levels, again not easily adjustable by the user for the "perfect" amount of progression.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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