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  1. #1
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    allot of question help a newbie out

    hi guys/girls.

    thanks for lookign at this post any information woudl be a great help. Well I'm just getting in to this crazy world of downhill cycling. all i can say is OMFG why was i doing anything else at all my whole life? so now im at odds, first thing I need a new bike currently im on one of those zellers/wallmart specials yah know the type the big piles of ****. i was looking around trying out some different bikes and I think i might have to get an azonic frame ive got it down to 3 of them. the eliminator 2, the analog 18" or the gravity. any suggestions? also my area (london ontario) has tonnes of trails but i cannot seem to find any place that has a racing team, what should i do keep looking or start my own? also since it is still winter here what sort of training should I get in to so im ready for the spring? also just any other information i should know remember im new

  2. #2
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    For a new rider, I 'd actually recommend something that can do more than just DH. In fact, I'd suggest a hardtail (no rear suspension at all) that you can do some DH on. You live in Ontario, which is not exactly mountainous and I think a full blown DH bike would just be a pig. Check with the local universities (UWO is there, isn't it) for riding clubs. They should be able to hook you up with group rides and such, or at least point you in the right direction.
    -Skimming the successpool of corporate America-

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Techfreak
    For a new rider, I 'd actually recommend something that can do more than just DH. In fact, I'd suggest a hardtail (no rear suspension at all) that you can do some DH on. You live in Ontario, which is not exactly mountainous and I think a full blown DH bike would just be a pig. Check with the local universities (UWO is there, isn't it) for riding clubs. They should be able to hook you up with group rides and such, or at least point you in the right direction.
    yeah it sucks ontario isnt to mountainist, but i am moving to BC soon. UWO is here in london so i shall check there. now why suggest the hardtail vs the FS?

  4. #4
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    Soverntear, check your private messages.

  5. #5
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    My advice is to call some local bike shops and talk to some poeple in your area before you go an order a frame online.It would suck if you order a frame online and then build it up
    and realize its not the bike for you.Do some reasearch before you make a decision,dont
    buy the first thing you see.I have some friends who made the mistake of buying a frame
    only and then sell it because its not for them.Go to the local trails and races and ask for some imput.Azonic makes some nice stuff ,are you ordering through a local bike shop?
    "I push bike up and ride it down"

  6. #6
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    I sent sovertear a PM, but he hasn't got back to me yet. I live in St. Thomas, 20 min away from London and got my bike in London.

  7. #7
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    cummings - got your pm and replyed,

    soilwork - thanks for the tidbit, i was plannin on orderign it from a shop, i hate online ordering.

    so any one have general advice or training advice?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soverntear
    hi the eliminator 2, the analog 18" or the gravity. any suggestions?
    forget the analog and eliminator 2

    buy the Recoil or Gravity if you are going Azzonicc.

    best bet is to buy a used Stinky or Bullit and save your cash.....stop riding the Wallmart bike on stuff immediately...they break very easy
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  9. #9
    Takw/agranofsalt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Techfreak
    For a new rider, I 'd actually recommend something that can do more than just DH. In fact, I'd suggest a hardtail (no rear suspension at all) that you can do some DH on. You live in Ontario, which is not exactly mountainous and I think a full blown DH bike would just be a pig. Check with the local universities (UWO is there, isn't it) for riding clubs. They should be able to hook you up with group rides and such, or at least point you in the right direction.
    No f-in way dude..don't waste your time on a hardtail. Get a real DH bike and you'll never look back

  10. #10
    Disco-Superfly
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    Get a hardtail first, you will not regret it...
    I got a hardtail first, and after 2 seasons, I think im going to go another one before I get a dual suspension frame...
    My bike is ready to go DS right now... (yeti asx)
    Jake
    Yeti 303 WC 25th

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Moody
    Didn't you read the sticker on that shock? It said not to do whatever you did.

  11. #11
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    A HT forces you to learn how to ride, how to pick lines, and how to use your body to minimize impacts. You will go slower on a HT, but for a nOOb, that is a good thing. (Don't worry, it will feel like you are going too fast.)

    The problem with starting out on a FS is that you get too dependent on the bike to absorb everything. I mean, any idiot can plow through a technical section with a super monster. So you spend tons on a bike, then tons more on all the stuff you break on it. No matter how many bikes you have, there is ALWAYS room for a decent HT.

    I have been riding a rigid bike for years, and I can clean sections that a lot of people wont go near without at least 6" of travel. THey have spent thousnads ontheir bike, and I can replace my entire bike 3 times over for that price. They are not really having any more fun than I am, and maybe less because they are too concerned with making sure everything is set up and working right. Take this in knowing that I am working from a limited sample of people. There are things that I simply cant do on my bike that I could on a FS, but not all that many.
    -Skimming the successpool of corporate America-

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Techfreak
    A HT forces you to learn how to ride, how to pick lines, and how to use your body to minimize impacts. You will go slower on a HT, but for a nOOb, that is a good thing. (Don't worry, it will feel like you are going too fast.)

    The problem with starting out on a FS is that you get too dependent on the bike to absorb everything. I mean, any idiot can plow through a technical section with a super monster. So you spend tons on a bike, then tons more on all the stuff you break on it. No matter how many bikes you have, there is ALWAYS room for a decent HT.

    I have been riding a rigid bike for years, and I can clean sections that a lot of people wont go near without at least 6" of travel. THey have spent thousnads ontheir bike, and I can replace my entire bike 3 times over for that price. They are not really having any more fun than I am, and maybe less because they are too concerned with making sure everything is set up and working right. Take this in knowing that I am working from a limited sample of people. There are things that I simply cant do on my bike that I could on a FS, but not all that many.
    Exactly!
    Jake
    Yeti 303 WC 25th

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Moody
    Didn't you read the sticker on that shock? It said not to do whatever you did.

  13. #13
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    well lots of compeating advice, but the idea that i will learn the basics betetr on a hard tail sounds like a good enough reason to go with one. and since its 2 years till i get to move to BC and start doin real DH stuff i suppose the money saved would be usable to build a kick ass bike when i get there

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soverntear
    well lots of compeating advice, but the idea that i will learn the basics betetr on a hard tail sounds like a good enough reason to go with one. and since its 2 years till i get to move to BC and start doin real DH stuff i suppose the money saved would be usable to build a kick ass bike when i get there
    That being said, the Specialized P bikes are pretty nice. You are in Canada, so definitely check out the Norco North Shore HT series. Some of the Iron Horse offerings are decent, too. I've heard good things about DaVinci and Banshee is doing complete bikes now (I have no idea what they cost, though.) Go with a complete bike rather than building one up on your own. You'll save a ton of money.
    -Skimming the successpool of corporate America-

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Techfreak
    That being said, the Specialized P bikes are pretty nice. You are in Canada, so definitely check out the Norco North Shore HT series. Some of the Iron Horse offerings are decent, too. I've heard good things about DaVinci and Banshee is doing complete bikes now (I have no idea what they cost, though.) Go with a complete bike rather than building one up on your own. You'll save a ton of money.
    savign money is a good thing as far as im concerned, now to think a kona cowan or a norco?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soverntear
    savign money is a good thing as far as im concerned, now to think a kona cowan or a norco?
    It can help us if you say your budget? Thers lots of great Hardtails out there
    Jake
    Yeti 303 WC 25th

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Moody
    Didn't you read the sticker on that shock? It said not to do whatever you did.

  17. #17
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    if you are currently riding a dept. store type bike, about 95% of your current parts will not be transferrable from frame to frame.....


  18. #18
    Kill that $hit!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soverntear
    savign money is a good thing as far as im concerned, now to think a kona cowan or a norco?
    Norco... deffinately,

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