Advice on going tubeless...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Advice on going tubeless...

    Hey

    The time has come to upgrade my current wheelset which has seen better days, I was just going to go with mavic 729s laced onto hope pro2 but I figure for a small extra cost I can stick on the 823s buy some new tyres etc and go tubeless...my question to those running tubeless is, is it worth it? what are the benefits other than losing the tubes (+ weight)...

    Any help would be appreciated as I'm a bit clueless on this issue!

    Cheers guys

  2. #2
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    pros & cons

    Quote Originally Posted by trumpetfiesta
    Hey

    The time has come to upgrade my current wheelset which has seen better days, I was just going to go with mavic 729s laced onto hope pro2 but I figure for a small extra cost I can stick on the 823s buy some new tyres etc and go tubeless...my question to those running tubeless is, is it worth it? what are the benefits other than losing the tubes (+ weight)...

    Any help would be appreciated as I'm a bit clueless on this issue!

    Cheers guys
    I'm running deemax tubeless and I'm sold!

    Biggest Pros:
    typically lighter than running a full DH tube which means less rolling resistance (this is a big plus if you want to go fast).

    can run lower pressure without pinch flatting

    can run a tube if you need to.

    Cons:
    limited UST tire choices - I don't run non UST tires, although you can as long as you use a sealant (Stans). Some tires work better than others.

    tires are typically more expensive than traditional tube designs. (for example, minions run around $40-$50 per tire)

    Some say set up is a pain. Once you do it, you get the hang of it and it is simple with a cheap $25 air compressor.

    I say do it. You'll never go back to tubes.

  3. #3
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    Don't do it unless you go with UST. I tried the Stan's 2 years ago and it was a big pain in my ass. It is just to hard trying to change tires when you don't have a UST system. I have done about 20-30 stan's installs on XC and trail bikes and I never had any problems after the first 1 or 2 times but my DH wheels just took a long time.
    i never used UST on my DH bike but I would/will in the future.

    I am going to use stans on my trial bike, I never change tires and the tires for a trail bike seem to seel better for some reason.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by boogenman
    Don't do it unless you go with UST. I tried the Stan's 2 years ago and it was a big pain in my ass. It is just to hard trying to change tires when you don't have a UST system. I have done about 20-30 stan's installs on XC and trail bikes and I never had any problems after the first 1 or 2 times but my DH wheels just took a long time.
    i never used UST on my DH bike but I would/will in the future.

    I am going to use stans on my trial bike, I never change tires and the tires for a trail bike seem to seel better for some reason.
    I've run non-UST and UST tires with stan's, with very similar success.. the UST def. takes less time to setup, but I would still suggest putting some stan's regardless, as stan's will be able to seal any hole u get in the tire(just got a tiny hole in my dh24 over the weekend and my stan's dried up so it didn;t seal the hole, that ended my day). I just recently put on a dh-casing 2.5 nevegal and that was surprisingly easy and very quick to setup in comparison to the normal stick-e 2.5 nevegal.. just take your time and make sure the tire is sealed and seated well. I use those co2 catridges to pop the tire onto the bead, but a good compressor or one of those compressors at a gas station will do the trick as well..
    "The future belongs to those that believe in the beauty of their dreams."

  5. #5
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    always use the stans.....last about 3 months......been ridin 823's tubeless for 4 years and would never go back.....I have had to fatal flats in that time......one was a rim hit that made a sharp edge and ripped my tire......I can see about 6 holes where the stans had filled in the holes right now....everyone else got flats (went through glass)
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  6. #6
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    I have been running ghetto tubless for a while now and have had zero issues. So few issues that my Nevegal / Big Earl combo is just about worn out and time to replace.

    On a side note does anyone re-use the ghetto strips that they created, or do I use brand new 20" tubes and cut-em down again?

  7. #7
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    Ability to run non-ust tires at 28 psi without fear of pinch flats! Its amazing how much faster and smoother I ride at 28psi vs 40psi when i have to run a tube. Also, unlimited tire choices plus the weight. I run tubeless in all my bikes and see no benefit to running tubes.

    There is a science to doing a tubeless conversion on a no-ust tire rim. Some tires/rims are better than others(plenty of info on here to walk you through it)

    I have run hundred of miles on tubeless w/o flatting(xc races to freeriding at diablo) until I tore a sidewall on my nevegal(my fault for using a sub 500gram tire at 28 psi in rocky conditions but still my first flat in 200+ miles of riding). I threw a tube in the tire as I was too lazy to replace the tire. 4 flats in 2 rides with a tube in the rear!! You almost forget how amazing the tubeless setup is. And that was at 40psi.

    I have run tubless in
    mavic:
    717
    223
    317
    stans olympic ztr(tubeless)
    outlaws
    not to mention countless customers bikes
    with no issues at all as long as you set up the rim strip correctly

    mike

  8. #8
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    I keep hearing people say they can run less tire pressure and not pinch flat...
    A few things to consider...
    A tire ran tubless comforms to trail irregularities more efficiently than a tire ran with a tube. In essence, the tire becomes more flexible.
    So, now that you are running a tire that is more flexible, is there really a nead to run less pressure as well?
    Pinch flats happen when the tube is pinched between the rim and the tire, cutting the tube.
    If you experience pinch flats at 30psi, and you swap to tubeless, I'd not go running even less pressure unless you enjoy smacking your rims off the ground/rocks/roots etc. Sure, you'll not likely pinch flat, but, the likelyhood of denting your rim has been hightened.

    Anyways, the whole lower pressure thing only makes sense to me for folks that either don't ride fast, or, whom do not mind risking rim damage.

    Personally, I found myself running more air pressure.
    The higher air pressure was in an effort to keep from striking the rims harshly on rocky trails.
    Even at greater air pressure the tire conforms to the ground much better than when running lower psi and tubes.
    Additionally, at greater pressure, while still conforming to the ground, I've decreased my rolling resistance... or, possibly not having the tube in there has decresed my rollinf resistance, either way, while coasting DH I noticed a big difference in the way my bike would gain on fellow riders (also coasting) where before I would not gain.
    Somewhere along the line, going tubeless makes a faster rolling rig.

    For what it's worth, I'm running 38-40psi in 2.5 Maxxis Minions in order to keep from striking the rim... the tires are more ply-able, than when ran tubed at 35psi.

    Pro's
    1. weight savings.
    2. have not flatted since going tubeless.
    3. hocus-pocus decreased rolling resistance.
    4. air pressure... either way you look at it, it's all good.

    Con's
    1. pretty much must have a air compressor to seat the tire on the rim (co2 did not work for me)... gas station air worked like a charm.

    Six of one half a dozen of the other
    1. still have to carry a spare tube/pump and flat kit should trailside repairs be needed.
    2. must have presta tube, unless you drill the rim out.
    My bike, Slayer 70

  9. #9
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    What do you do when you get a flat when you're tubeless? Can you repair it on the trail?

  10. #10
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    as long as the bead has not been broke free of the rim, you can use a sidewall repair kit to fix any holes in the tire that Stans cannot...
    otherwise, you peel back the tire, remove the valve stem from the rim, insert a presta tube, and off you go.

    in all honesty, any flat you are going to experience running tubeless with Stan's is going to have caused pretty heavy damage to the tire itself... which is a situation where a tube would not have made a difference one way or the other... and you'll be into tire repair...
    My bike, Slayer 70

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harksaw
    What do you do when you get a flat when you're tubeless? Can you repair it on the trail?
    superglue for the bad holes, but mostly just re-inflate...I like the co2 cans

    FYI...don't use superglue when tire is full....it will spray all over your face
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

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