Is a 66SL right for me?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Is a 66SL right for me?

    I'm getting a new bike within the next couple of months. I haven't settled on a frame yet, but I'm looking along the lines of an Intense 6.6 or SC Nomad, just so you know what kind of bike we're talking about here. I'm thinking about getting a 66SL for it, but I have a few questions?

    First off, does anybody here have one, and if so, how is it working for you? I've never had a fork that needed air, so I don't know how well this damping works. Is it a pain in the butt to set up, or is it pretty easy? Also, is the fork adjustable from 150mm-170mm, or is it available in either travel option? I couldn't tell from Marz's site and I know I can't use the 170mm version on those frames. For those from SoCal, I often ride Mt. Lowe and Sturdevant, so how would that fork hold up on those trails? Any other input you may have is welcomed.

  2. #2
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    sounds like the the right fork for you

  3. #3
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    66 Sl

    I've got one on my Uzzi VPX.

    I really like it! It was definitely sticky at first, before the seals broke in. Once they did, it feels really smooth.

    It does take some time to set up. The advantage with multiple air springs is you can really tune the fork for your riding style. There are two positive springs, a negative spring, and a travel-end/bottom out spring. I am about 205 with gear, and I'm now running 36psi in each positive spring, 80 in the negative spring, and 15 in the bottom-out. That works great for general trail riding, and I've gone off 8' drops without bottoming out harshly. If I was going to shuttle or ride at a resort, I would increase the pressure in the two positive springs.

    The travel is adjusted by increasing the air in the negative spring. Once you get over a certain ratio negativeositive air, the fork starts to drop. I'm using all the travel on mine, though.

    Isn't the 6.6 built around a 6" fork? I would check out the Fox 36 models, also.

  4. #4
    bpuodt
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    Ordered mine on Monday!

    $656 from AEBIKE.COM !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Cheapest you can get one for.

    Funny how other companies are selling them on sale for even more than that. *go-ride*

    Mine's going on a Saber. 6x6 for general trail riding and freeriding. 7x6 for whistler and more technical NS trails.




    Does anyone know how far down the negative air will bring the fork? It's gotta go below 150mm a little ways at least.


    Here's some cool stuff I've found out about the new doppio 66 air fork:

    At least on the 66 SL there are 4 air springs.

    positive
    negative
    bottom out
    right leg chamber

    From what I understand, Marzocchi made a special air system that will never fail you on a steep section and send you over the bars.

    First is the obvious one. If the left leg air spring totaly goes out, then you still have air in the right leg to keep the fork up somewhat. At least it can be inflated enough to get you home, harshly, but home.

    Second is the primary system for keeping the fork from compressing too much. If the positive chamber gives out, there is still the bottom out progression chamber to hold the fork from bottom travel.

    Third is a little less obvious. The negative spring can hold upwards of 200 psi. The positive chamber holds 65 psi or less. If the internal seals inside the air spring give out the high pressure air from the negative chamber will spill out into the positve chamber, making the fork super harsh, but at least UP in its travel as apposed to DOWN in its travel. This can make the difference between a lousy day with a blown shock, or a trip over the handle bars because the fork collapsed and never sprung back. Forks with les negative spring pressure than positive will get stuck down when the internal seals leak air.

    I feel REALLY confident in hucking this fork. I plan on hitting some nasty drops, stumps, and logs with this beast!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rich.grandzol
    I've got one on my Uzzi VPX.

    I really like it! It was definitely sticky at first, before the seals broke in. Once they did, it feels really smooth.

    It does take some time to set up. The advantage with multiple air springs is you can really tune the fork for your riding style. There are two positive springs, a negative spring, and a travel-end/bottom out spring. I am about 205 with gear, and I'm now running 36psi in each positive spring, 80 in the negative spring, and 15 in the bottom-out. That works great for general trail riding, and I've gone off 8' drops without bottoming out harshly. If I was going to shuttle or ride at a resort, I would increase the pressure in the two positive springs.

    The travel is adjusted by increasing the air in the negative spring. Once you get over a certain ratio negativeositive air, the fork starts to drop. I'm using all the travel on mine, though.

    Isn't the 6.6 built around a 6" fork? I would check out the Fox 36 models, also.
    Thanks rich. Yes, the 6.6 is built around 6" fork, that's why I wanted to know if the fork can be ordered in a 150mm version instead of a 170mm version, or if the travel is adjusted by the user? Also, you said on your 8' drops you don't bottom out harshly; if that was the case for me, could I just increase the air in one/both of the legs to prevent that?

    Thx

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbfrdh1
    Also, you said on your 8' drops you don't bottom out harshly; if that was the case for me, could I just increase the air in one/both of the legs to prevent that?

    Thx
    ...you would actually have several options to correct that. You could simply add more positive air to the left & right chambers. You could add air to the PAR chamber which is there specifically to control end-stroke compression damping (bottom-out) or you could raise the oil levels slightly (this last option I am assuming, however it's how all their models work...seems safe to assume the 66 SL no different). Each option would create slightly different characteristics to the ride/ feel of the fork....all in all, if the air can deliver the ride/ feel of a typical 'zocchi, this fork should prove to be a very tuneable model.


  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=rich.grandzol]I've got one on my Uzzi VPX.

    I really like it! It was definitely sticky at first, before the seals broke in. Once they did, it feels really smooth./QUOTE]

    One other question; how does the fork feel to small, high speed bumps? Are they more noticeable than coil/oil Marz forks, or does it feel pretty much the same?
    Last edited by hbfrdh1; 11-22-2005 at 11:16 PM.

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=hbfrdh1]
    Quote Originally Posted by rich.grandzol
    I've got one on my Uzzi VPX.

    I really like it! It was definitely sticky at first, before the seals broke in. Once they did, it feels really smooth.QUOTE]

    One other question; how does the fork feel to small, high speed bumps? Are they more noticeable than coil/oil Marz forks, or does it feel pretty much the same?
    I got to check out a 2005 66 RC in the shop today. The guy had it set up really, really stiff. His stantions didn't look like the last 2" of travel ever got used. Anyway, I think my fork felt better and smoother. I imagine if he didn't have his set up so stiff they would feel pretty similar.

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