4x-hardtail vs. full- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    4x-hardtail vs. full

    I have recently come across a bit of money and I want to build up a 4x bike. I am still in between on a hardtail or a full though. Right now I am looking at the yeti 4x and the yeti dj. I would just go buy the 4x but its almost 1000 more that I could spend on better parts etc. So for all those west coast 4x racers would you prefer a hardtail or full for the western usa 4x races(Sea Otter, fontana, sandhill, deer valley) I know sea otter and deer valley are a bit rougher and fontana and sandhill are preety much groomed courses, what do you think?
    --Ryan

  2. #2
    StraightOuttaCompton
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    hardtail=better pedal efficiency, rougher ride

    Full Sus=less pedal efficiency, better bump absorbtion and smoothness.

    it is just preference, like grips, just more spendy.
    HARDTAIL PRIDE- 09 Kona Five-0

  3. #3
    Rb
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    Based on experience, it's hard to argue with the performance/price ratio of a hardtail...

    The Yeti 4x is an amazing bike, but it truly is a World Cup-level bike. It'll smooth the edges (so to speak) off nastier, rougher courses with much bigger jumps and more technical rhythm sections but your gains are only marginal -- ESPECIALLY if the local races are on smoother courses.

    You're right, you'd be saving nearly $1,000. And having ridden both bikes, you're going to love the Yeti DJ. Your wallet (along with most peoples') isn't going to love the 4x enough to justify the extra money UNLESS you're pro enough to warrant it.

    I disagree with the above post about slalom fullies having lower pedaling efficiency. Platform shocks (like an RP23) are so dialed nowadays, the the power you generate from your legs is going to translate to the same amount of power to your rear wheel regardless.

  4. #4
    Meh.
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    I'm with Ray Bao. Platform shocks, especially in conjunction with some of the suspension designs these days... really eliminates or minimizes the issue of pedaling efficiency.

  5. #5
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    I'm very surprised with how well my DJ handles rough DH stuff as well as regular trail riding. It's noticeably more slack than most frames in this vein but it gives a bit more stability. I haven't noticed any problems cornering at speed with it but also haven't been on any 4X courses. The only issue I'd see with the hardtail is being able to pedal through bumpy sections and maintain traction/control. You going to run platforms or clipless?
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenbentit
    It's noticeably more slack than most frames in this vein but it gives a bit more stability

    Aren't you running a longer fork on it though?

  7. #7
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    the new crop of short travel FS frames and new shocks make their advantages far outweigh ttheir old disadvantages.

    Check out the Banshee Rampant. I think it's available now, or very soon. The little thing rips
    <object width="432" height="351"><param name="movie" value="http://www.megavideo.com/v/C1YW2COP5d6cfea228b6c3fd17e9d88d6caddea1.367093444 2.0"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.megavideo.com/v/C1YW2COP5d6cfea228b6c3fd17e9d88d6caddea1.367093444 2.0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="432" height="351"></embed></object>

  8. #8
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    spam

    Quote Originally Posted by novato kid
    I have recently come across a bit of money and I want to build up a 4x bike. I am still in between on a hardtail or a full though. Right now I am looking at the yeti 4x and the yeti dj. I would just go buy the 4x but its almost 1000 more that I could spend on better parts etc. So for all those west coast 4x racers would you prefer a hardtail or full for the western usa 4x races(Sea Otter, fontana, sandhill, deer valley) I know sea otter and deer valley are a bit rougher and fontana and sandhill are preety much groomed courses, what do you think?
    --Ryan
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  9. #9
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    Aren't you running a longer fork on it though?

    Yeah, forgot that the new fork is 140 mm vs the 100 mm I was running. They HA is 68 deg. with 100 mm so I'm a bit more slack than that. Feels very nice though...
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  10. #10
    Living Ghetto Fabulous!
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    I am in no way really knowledgeable in this area, but I have read that the biggest advantage to a hardtail over fullys is out of the gate... Not only will you have a more responsive snap when the gate drops, hardtails will usually have a shorter chainstay length. That in turn aids in getting the holeshot. (duh.)

    Not to mention lighter weight, less maintenance ect. ect.
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  11. #11
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    I'm agreeing w/ the yeti 4x/dj choices.. These two frames are hands down the 4x frames out there..
    i have a dj.. and LOVE it.. super fast and responsive.. I've always lusted over a 4x.. so i'd say go for the gold and grab the 4x....

    but if you can't decide.. just flip a coin.. its really a win win situation ... .

  12. #12
    yaha ha
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    get a full susp, blur 4x, intense tazer.. some other options. that way you can still trail ride it. i ride my sx (previous blur 4x) in auburn and fast flowy trails all over and its one of my favorite bikes.

    i dont know what your build would be like if you built the HT up for 4x. but that may be your choice if you want a DJ hardtail that youd race as well.

  13. #13
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    I would say go for the full squish so you can trail ride it too.
    Go BIG or Go HOME

  14. #14
    i eat rocks
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    i have a hard tail , i dont race 4x but i live near fontana and ride there frequently, (not saying im good i just ride there) i would appreciate 4x 10 fold if i had a fully on their course.

    i dont know how other courses are as i dont race 4x and i have only seen the one at fontana, but for that specific course i would say full.

  15. #15
    No e-drama please!!
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    I built & rode a the Morewood NdizaST a few times.It's super quick & the frame with shock weighs 7.25#. Great geometry.
    I'm back on my Bullit with a 66RC for freeride.

    DEMO8
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  16. #16
    StraightOuttaCompton
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    that banshee is sick
    HARDTAIL PRIDE- 09 Kona Five-0

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