Devinci Atlas vs RIP 9 RDO- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Devinci Atlas vs RIP 9 RDO

    Has any here ridden both of these bikes and can provide a comparison? I'd have to get the alloy Atlas vs carbon due to budget, but it will be within .5 pounds of the RDO. Frame size would be large for the RDO and XL for the Atlas. I narrowed it down to these 2 bikes for their shorter wheelbases (trails here in the Midwest are very tight and twisty), and they are stiff enough to run a 140mm fork. Ibis Ripley and SC Tallboy LT are out of my budget.

    The Atlas has those really short chain stays, which appeals to me, but the sta gets crazy slack, and the BB gets rather high with a 140mm fork. I'm worried this will make climbing up steep technical terrain difficult. The RDO has longer chainstays, but the overall geometry seems more "balanced" in the larger frame sizes. I don't know if having that linkage below the BB will lead to poor bearing life, or contact with rocks and logs. I prefer tha threaded BB of the RDO over the Atlas pressfit. Warranty is lifetime for Devinci vs 5 years for the RDO.

  2. #2
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    I don't know about the Niner, but I had an Atlas (just sold it) and I can confirm that with a 140mm fork the seat angle get too slack... I had an angle headset custom made to slacken the HA without a tall fork.

  3. #3
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    I little edit here to clarify:

    The Atlas has a slacker SA compared to the bike I'm coming from; a KHS 6500, which rides similar to a Troy. In terms of HA, the Atlas is no where near as slack as Troy, even with a longer fork. The Atlas rides more like an XC bike.

    I am demoing a medium Atlas carbon with a 130mm Rev, chips in the high position, and I feel like it's the first FS I've ridden where the TT is not too long, or makes me feel crowded. The bike as configured is quicker handling than my KHS, I could easilly see running a 140mm fork or keeping the 130mm fork and dropping the chip to the low position. I can't imagine it could ever be made "too slack".

    I have not ridden a Niner.

    For me, the biggest difference between the Atlas and my current ride (KHS 6500), the Troy, and my Honzo, is that the steering is very quick (running a 70mm stem) and the bike feels very tall.

    The Ripley is a nice bike, but the BB is kinda low, and like you said it's an expensive bike. One of the shop "buddies" just added a 140mm Pike to his XL Ripley, so far he really likes it; he had a 120mm Fox.

    I prefer a higher BB because pedal strike is a big deal where I ride.

    I'm moving away from the 650b because the wheels are too small for my riding style and I wanted a better climber; I think 29ers keep the wheel down better.

    In person, the difference in frame geometry between the Atlas med and large is much more significant than the difference between the Atlas large and x-large. The Atlas Carbon is only $300 more than the aluminum, I'd think that was worth the extra dollars, esp from a resell standpoint.

    I'm going to ride it a bunch this weekend, drop the chip and see how it rides slack.

    I think DeVinci makes a nice bike and you can't laugh at a lifetime warranty on a carbon frame.

    Quote Originally Posted by savo View Post
    I don't know about the Niner, but I had an Atlas (just sold it) and I can confirm that with a 140mm fork the seat angle get too slack... I had an angle headset custom made to slacken the HA without a tall fork.
    Last edited by Nurse Ben; 01-08-2015 at 03:57 PM.

  4. #4
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    Well, here's one way to find out...
    Devinci Atlas vs RIP 9 RDO-img_20150717_193455404.jpg

  5. #5
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    I've demoed a rip rdo. And must say I was deeply disappointed in it. Flexy wheel set to wide a bar for the stem. Handling seemed really slow. (Probably do to the wrong bar stem combo. ). I went to the demo wanting to be blown away so I would want to buy one but I was just sad after wards. I currently have a 2012 fsr stumpy comp. which was my main ride when I demoed the niner. At my stumpy bone stock out the door at $2400 was a ripper and even more so with the upgrades I've made to it since. I also have a chromag rootdown in ss build with a 150 pike and this thing is just down right awesome!! Just got a 2016 fsr stumpy. Haven't had it out yet since it won't stop raining. All 3 bikes are 29s.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    That's a shame about your experience on the Rip. I've rented and demoed a lot of different 29ers (including every suspension design: vpp, DW link, Split Pivot, FSR, single pivot, and I-Drive) and I think it's an awesome bike. The suspension is the best I've ridden as far as being plush and active, while not wallowing under hard pedaling, and having fantastic rear tire traction when descending and climbing. The handling is pretty dialed too, with the right stem/bar combo.

  7. #7
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    I owned a '12 RIP, a '14 RIP, and demoed an RDO. My riding has gone in a different direction in the last couple years, and I'm on a 160mm 27.5 bike now. Be that as it may, I LOVED all of the RIPs I rode, at the time. The '12 was awesome as my first modern FS 29er, and the '14 alloy improved on that in every way. The RDO was stiffer, more damp, and more responsive to input. If I could own two bikes, I'd easily go back to that RDO, in addition to my Megatrail.

    This may or may not be relevant to you, but a 280 lb buddy of mine broke his '12 WFO whilst getting rowdy, and Niner quickly warrantied it with a '14 WFO. He was riding within a week of cracking his seat tube on the old bike. Great customer service, made easier by a pretty good network of dealers. I don't have a DeVinci dealer within 45 minutes of me, and I live in a major metropolitan area.

    I've not ridden the Atlas, and have nothing to say either way, but my experience with Niner bikes is top notch.

  8. #8
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    I am riding a large atlas carbon matched with a 130 mm pike.
    I am not a huge numbers guy but I feel the bike rides like it has a low bottom bracket which i really like. I live in colorado and ride really steep up and down and have a 1 x 10 with a 30 tooth narrow wide. I am not sure if I would want to ride the bike with a 140 mm pike because of the super steep climbs because of the really short chain stays. If you are not riding super steep terrain i would not be so worried about the 140 mm fork on the bike. My buddy ride and RDO and he really likes it! He bought one and has gotten two for free because of warranty issues.

  9. #9
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    The Atlas is technically my brother's bike. He bought the new frame and I built it up with my parts from my hardtail, so it will serve as my spare bike in case my RIP9 is down, or if I just need a random change of pace.

    The Atlas is an XL frame, which has nearly identical reach and stack measurements as my size Large RIP9 RDO. I used zero offset seat posts and have the saddles slide full forward on both bikes to marginalize the slack seat tube angles and keep the front tire weighted on steep climbs. The Atlas has a 120mm Manitou Tower Pro, and my RIP9 has a 120/150mm dual position Pike. I find myself using the 120mm position a lot on the RIP9 because I prefer the lower bottom bracket height and weight distribution when climbing and on flatter terrain, but I use the 150 on longer/rougher descents. The bottom bracket heights on both the Atlas and the RIP9 at 120mm are 13.5". I'm using a 70mm stem on the RIP and a 60mm stem on the Atlas, both flipped negative. This provides an equal horizontal distance from the back of the saddle to the middle of the stem/handlebars on both bikes, when the saddle height is set. What this means is that the Atlas has a slacker STA compared to the RIP, but not by much.

    The geometry similarities end when it comes to chainstay length and wheelbase. I measured the RIP9 at 450mm CS and 1162 WB, while the Atlas comes in at 429mm and 1132mm.

    I set both bikes up with 1x10 drivetrains. The RIP has a 32T front and 11-36 XT cassette with a One-Up 42 cog, while the Atlas is more budget friendly at 30T front with a normal 11-36 SLX cassette. Both bikes have Deore hydraulic brakes.

    Next Up, Initial Ride Impressions...

  10. #10
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    I've demoed both bikes (only Alum version of the Atlas) and my preference goes towards the Devinci.

    I really liked and was surprised at the climbing ability of the Atlas, perhaps I under-estimated its capability, but comparing it to the Niner, it was just a tad less capable, which was a happy surprise.

    Both bikes are great, but as others have mentioned, the lifetime warranty is a heavy factor in my mind too and thus I'd recommend the Atlas all things considered.

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