2020 Devinci Django Thread- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2020 Devinci Django Thread

    I have one ride on it so far and loved it!


  2. #2
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    Yep. Just got the Pinkbike preview in my newsfeed. Looks like a great update to the model. It was actually my first choice (2019) before deciding to go with the Troy.

    https://m.pinkbike.com/news/first-ri...carbon-29.html




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    Things I like and should have been implemented on the OG Django 29:

    - The shock mount no longer collects water and dirt as there are holes for stuff to escape!
    - The bike comes with frame protection
    - It comes without the silly DT Swiss rear axle (or am I wrong on this?)
    - Some sizes actually have a decent length on the chainstay!


    Things I don't like:

    - Well, the first is obvious: rear spacing/superboost
    - The geometry is really close to Troy, so the difference on a medium is basically the amount of travel. Interesting. A bit like the Pivot Trail429 and Switchblade...
    - The new one is uglier IMO but this is subjective
    - Price is quite high for spec

    Glad I have the original Django 29 with rear spacing that don't kill my knees (-> q-factor grows) and where travel, geometry and build-kit meets. The build on the new bike is kinda heavy-hitting compared to travel. BUT, I have never ridden this bike, only the previous version. It might be the best bike on the planet, who knows? But seeing this new bike does not make me want it as it follows the whole industry in making trailbikes overly aggressive for what they are. All people are not the same though and some will sacrifice all-day fun for a bit more speed on the roughest descents.

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    Disappointed in sizing. Top out on an XL is probably 6'2"...

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    When I saw the news, I thought maybe I'd look into the new frame, but reading it is super-boost means I can't just swap stuff over without a rear wheel rebuild and crankset. I wish they'd have left the Troy as their super-boost bike and used this opportunity to clean up some of the little stuff on the Django. It looks like they nailed that stuff - the lower shock mount, improved pivot bearings, carbon chainstays and linkage, frame protection (threaded BB, but I have never really had a problem with PF).

    Of course they were going to slack it out a bit to stay current with what everyone else is doing, and I'm glad to see they didn't get as crazy as Santa Cruz did with the new Tallboy. Looks like a fun new bike, but I wish they would have stuck with a 148 rear end for the Django.

  6. #6
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    What does the Django offer that the Troy doesn't? Seems like a lot of overlap?
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    What does the Django offer that the Troy doesn't? Seems like a lot of overlap?
    My understanding is that the Django falls squarely in the Trail category, while the Troy is All Mountain. I chose the Troy over the Django for the extra travel (with the option to run 160 forks up front) since there is plenty opportunity to negotiate more technical terrain here in Colorado, so the Troy fits the bill as being a better all-arounder for the type of riding I do here. If it weren't for that I think I would've opted for the Django in a 27.5... if that's what you're asking.

  8. #8
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    Nice looking bike. Looking at the geo, this is really more of a short travel Enduro bike than a Trail bike. Not much of a difference between it and the Troy expect for little less travel and a little lighter.

    Devinci should have went the other way with it, designed it around 120/130 fork and much shorter wheelbase. Trail bikes should be playful and easy to ride. This does not look like it would be either in tight twist trail type riding.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by In2falling View Post
    Nice looking bike. Looking at the geo, this is really more of a short travel Enduro bike than a Trail bike. Not much of a difference between it and the Troy expect for little less travel and a little lighter.

    Devinci should have went the other way with it, designed it around 120/130 fork and much shorter wheelbase. Trail bikes should be playful and easy to ride. This does not look like it would be either in tight twist trail type riding.
    This seems to be the type of geometry that gets the better reviews by the professional reviewers. Pinkbike, vital, etc... Good reviews lead to sales.

    Ibis Ripley V4 has almost identical angles and Ibis can't keep up with demand.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velorangutan View Post
    This seems to be the type of geometry that gets the better reviews by the professional reviewers. Pinkbike, vital, etc... Good reviews lead to sales.

    Ibis Ripley V4 has almost identical angles and Ibis can't keep up with demand.
    Yep. And it's perceived value and marketing. Hardly anyone knows what a Devinci is compared to the likes of Ibis. And when it comes to resale it's not even close. Put a different sticker on a lot of bikes, and sales skyrocket.

  11. #11
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    There's also the DW link suspension difference. I actually prefer Devinci's split pivot to pretty much every 4-bar incarnation I've ridden, but fancy suspension seems to sell.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SlipperyToad View Post
    There's also the DW link suspension difference. I actually prefer Devinci's split pivot to pretty much every 4-bar incarnation I've ridden, but fancy suspension seems to sell.
    Yeah, I was trying to be kind. I've owned about 6 or 8 DW Links and 1 or 2 Split Pivot. Split Pivot is very good on descents under braking, but it's climbing prowess in loose, rocky, steep and fast sections is below average. Plus the feedback through the pedals in high torque choppy descents is not that good. But most riders don't know or care about that. They buy based on impulse or emotion; I have about 15 years in sports and outdoor marketing and advertising so I dole out the BS as well as anyone, ha.

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    Agreed, if technical climbing is your jam, you're better off on a DW link bike.

  14. #14
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    This guy does a great job of putting into words a lot of what I experience riding this bike.

    https://youtu.be/Zms49DpP8m4
    https://youtu.be/Zms49DpP8m4

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    Based on a photo in one of the reviews, it seems that devinci arent using a trunnion mount shock on the new Django. I cant help but wonder why.

    I have a Troy 29er. The new Django is marketed as being able to accept bigger tires than the Troy (2.6 vs 2.4). On the Troy, the limitation seems to be the overall wheel height/short chain stays. Im curious if the chain and seat stays are interchangeable between the two models.


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    https://images.immediate.co.uk/produ...size=375%2C250

    Here is the photo that I was referring to


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by incubus View Post
    https://images.immediate.co.uk/produ...size=375%2C250

    Here is the photo that I was referring to


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    I'll look and see with the bikes I have. That would have made sense to keep manufacturing costs down!

  18. #18
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    Maybe its an improvement overall as a bike, But I'm just not a fan of the looks. Similar to the Troy, that Scott-like bend to the top tube doesn't thrill me, and that extra carbon wedge between it and the seat tube just strikes me as fugly.

    Do like the full carbon stays, and the downtube and chainstay protection. Not sure whether the 44 offset is a plus or minus. The blue looks sharper in your picture than the stock photos on the website.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by westin View Post
    Yeah, I was trying to be kind. I've owned about 6 or 8 DW Links and 1 or 2 Split Pivot. Split Pivot is very good on descents under braking, but it's climbing prowess in loose, rocky, steep and fast sections is below average. Plus the feedback through the pedals in high torque choppy descents is not that good. But most riders don't know or care about that. They buy based on impulse or emotion; I have about 15 years in sports and outdoor marketing and advertising so I dole out the BS as well as anyone, ha.
    Hmmm, I have a Django and a Pivot 429. I find the Devinci handles better in most circumstances. As far as efficiency with the rear suspension? The Pivot may be a bit snappier but Id be splitting hairs. I havent ridden the Pivot since I got the Devinci, my son is on it now. The split pivot is probably more efficient than most designs. Id say that calling it below average isnt accurate at all.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinshield View Post
    Hmmm, I have a Django and a Pivot 429. I find the Devinci handles better in most circumstances. As far as efficiency with the rear suspension? The Pivot may be a bit snappier but Id be splitting hairs. I havent ridden the Pivot, my son is on it now. The split pivot is probably more efficient than most designs. Id say that calling it below average isnt accurate at all.
    It's just my opinion based on owning the django carbon for two years, and being an extremely strong climber. It's also just my opinion based on anecdotal evidence of friends witnessing me flail about or ride slower in many trail conditions for those two years that I normally cleaned or sped through with less effort. Since parting ways with the split pivot, my Strava times, KOMs, and the aforementioned anecdotal input have returned to "normal."

    Descending, the django was very good. Compared to my Ripley V4 with the same parts spec, it's not even in the same league as a climber whether seated or standing.

    Climbing in many situations, I'll stick with my opinion that the django was below average especially in the low-chip position. Too much leverage and I don't think it was a true 74.5 STA; the sag had to be decreased to keep it from riding too low and bobbing under power.

    To each their own. I'm much happier not spending all day climbing on a Split Pivot especially in steep, loose, rocky conditions.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by westin View Post
    It's just my opinion based on owning the django carbon for two years, and being an extremely strong climber. It's also just my opinion based on anecdotal evidence of friends witnessing me flail about or ride slower in many trail conditions for those two years that I normally cleaned or sped through with less effort. Since parting ways with the split pivot, my Strava times, KOMs, and the aforementioned anecdotal input have returned to "normal."

    Descending, the django was very good. Compared to my Ripley V4 with the same parts spec, it's not even in the same league as a climber whether seated or standing.

    Climbing in many situations, I'll stick with my opinion that the django was below average especially in the low-chip position. Too much leverage and I don't think it was a true 74.5 STA; the sag had to be decreased to keep it from riding too low and bobbing under power.

    To each their own. I'm much happier not spending all day climbing on a Split Pivot especially in steep, loose, rocky conditions.
    My Pivot sucks on techy steep climbs. Takes every bit of attention to keep it steering straight. My Django always straight and Im able to motor up stuff I couldnt on my Pivot. Ive never ridden in the low setting. Too rocky around here I set it to high and left it. Ive set more PRs on my Django than any other bike Ive owned. I honestly dont think it has anything to do with the rear suspension and everything to do with the geo and how I fit on it.

  22. #22
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    Related sidenote: tried giving you more rep, but seems I did a while ago for another of your well-written posts, ha. It's nice having a mature opinionated convo on a forum. Rare these days. Enjoy your ride.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by westin View Post
    Related sidenote: tried giving you more rep, but seems I did a while ago for another of your well-written posts, ha. It's nice having a mature opinionated convo on a forum. Rare these days. Enjoy your ride.
    Thanks, you too man

  24. #24
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    To those who think the '20 Django is like the '19+ Troy at all, it's most certainly not. In my stable right now I have a '18 Marshall, '18 + '19 Troy, '20 Django, and '19 Spartan. They are very different feeling bikes. And they all (except the 2 Troys) have very different ride characteristics.
    To be completely honest, the Troys are not getting ridden much at all anymore. I've passed the '18 Marshall to my wife (she LOVES it), and the '18 Troy to a friend. The '19 Troy is getting sold now. I just use the '20 Django and '19 Spartan now.
    The Spartan is too close to the Troy for me. They pedal and fit similarly. I figure if I want to ride blues with occasional blacks, the Django is awesome. If I'm on burly rides, the Spartan is the go-to. The Troy never really did either that well.
    Troy vs Django: Uphill traction, equal. Uphill grinding, Django. Uphill tech, Django. Flat sprints, Django. Downhill flow, Django. Downhill tech, Troy. Downhill jank, Troy. Maneuverability, Django. Snappiness, Django. Jumping, Troy. Fun, Django.
    The only times I wished for the Troy, I would have rather been on the Spartan.
    Still think the Troy is a strong bike, and a great do-it-all (especially with a coil), but if you can have two, I love having the Spartan and Django.
    **The Django is built on the burly side with 150 Lyrik, Saint brakes, WTB Vigilante light/TrailBoss tough. Weighs in at 31 lbs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by abacall View Post
    To those who think the '20 Django is like the '19+ Troy at all, it's most certainly not. In my stable right now I have a '18 Marshall, '18 + '19 Troy, '20 Django, and '19 Spartan. They are very different feeling bikes.
    When do you ride the Marshall? I am considering a used to compliment my Ripmo AF.

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    No much, my wife loves it and it's her bike now. TBH, the new Django does everything it did, but a little better. The Marshall felt a bit more burly, and it can switch between 27.5+ and 29. She currently running it with 2.8 HR2 and Ikons. She loves the traction and comfort that gives, but still pedals awesome.

    Oh, and I took a pic of the new Django fully compressed in Low. Looks like about 10mm more left, so not sure on running longer stroke shock unless it's in the high position. I have a spare 50mm stroke shock I'll swap on at some point this winter to check if it'll work.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2020 Devinci Django Thread-img_1472.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by abacall View Post
    **The Django is built on the burly side with 150 Lyrik, Saint brakes, WTB Vigilante light/TrailBoss tough. Weighs in at 31 lbs.
    abacall, Ive been demoing the 2020 Django for a week now and am getting along with it quite well. I had a 18 Troy but went back to my 17 Switchblade. The Django definitely climbs east coast super tech better than the Pivot, which is kind of a pig and has a slack STA. My only concern with the Django is the increase in pedal strikes Im getting, which I think might be a result of both a lower BB and more active suspension than Im currently riding. I put it in high setting but that placed me just a tad bit too forward for my liking (made it feel more like the riding position of a Ripley V4, which Im not a fan of).

    Im thinking that putting a 150 fork on the Django (to slacken a bit) will allow the high setting to feel less forward, i.e. maybe doing this will maintain the geometry and riding position of the low setting while also gaining a few mm of BB height and add some travel. Question is... have you run in high with the 150 fork? How does the bike handle and climb in low with the 150? Any significant difference from stock 140 fork...? Thx!
    Last edited by Jspagat; 05-19-2020 at 05:01 PM.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jspagat View Post
    abacall, Ive been demoing the 2020 Django for a week now and am getting along with it quite well. I had a 18 Troy but went back to my 17 Switchblade. The Django definitely climbs east coast super tech better than the Pivot, which is kind of a pig and has a slack STA. My only concern with the Django is the increase in pedal strikes Im getting, which I think might be a result of both a lower BB and more active suspension than Im currently riding. I put it in high setting but that placed me just a tad bit too forward for my liking (made it feel more like the riding position of a Ripley V4, which Im not a fan of).

    Im thinking that putting a 150 fork on the Django (to slacken a bit) will allow the high setting to feel less forward, i.e. maybe doing this will maintain the geometry and riding position of the low setting while also gaining a few mm of BB height and add some travel. Question is... have you run in high with the 150 fork? How does the bike handle and climb in low with the 150? Any significant difference from stock 140 fork...? Thx!
    Never put it in the high position with the 150 fork. Like you said, the fork does ride the BB a bit, and that just seems way too high for me. With the 150 fork the ST is still plenty steep, and the HA gets a bit more slack, which is good for my intentions with this bike.
    I've never really had pedal strike issues with the 150 fork, at least not any more than any other modern bike. A fast engaging hub helped that a lot, as you can ratchet your way up and adjust for those pedal smash moments easier.
    As far as handling with the 150, it feels pretty damn natural to be honest. I thought the 120/150 combo would be ridiculous, but it's not. Part of the is the RS Lyrik. Like most RS forks, it has a little bit of suck-down, which makes it really close to the 140 anyway.

  29. #29
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    Yea, a 150 fork in the low setting works well. Good all around. High works too, but low better if the terrain allows for it.

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    jspagat - Sounds like the 150 fork solves the problems you were having? I'm demo'ing a Django now and having issues with pedal strikes (running standard 140 fork and high geo setting). Would love to see a higher bottom bracket, esp for Mass East Coast riding. Not sure I would want to run a 150 but looking at options as I like all other aspects of the bike.

    Also, seems like you've ridden a lot of bikes I've been looking at-demo'ing. How does the Django match up to the Ripley V4, Rocky Instinct regarding climbing, bottom bracket height and overall fit for East Coast riding? I liked the Pivot 429 for most stuff but found it a bit too grounded-planted for my liking around here. Any other bikes you might recommend looking at that match up to the Django?

  31. #31
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    339 mm isnt particularly low for a BB. My 2018 Django is 341 with a 170mm crank. Not sure what size cranks the new models come with. I have mine in high mode and no issues riding MA and NH trails. Definitely one of the better bikes for riding around here. Its an East Coast bike. Ripley is probably lower than the Django.

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    Thanks for the reply Tinshield. Agreed it's not a terribly low BB and I think some of the suspension activeness is in play with the pedal strikes at times. It's a 170 crank as well and I am riding in the high setting for BB clearance. Certainly not a major problem but something I'm trying to figure out as I do another demo on it. As Jspagat mentioned as well, the high setting puts me fairly forward on the bike which I'm trying to get used to. Backing the seat up on the rails a bit will likely cause a bit more dive in the suspension at times with a little more weight moving back. Likely all minor things I could get used to but tough to figure it all out over a demo period only. Thanks again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DizzyPanzer5 View Post

    Also, seems like you've ridden a lot of bikes I've been looking at-demo'ing. How does the Django match up to the Ripley V4, Rocky Instinct regarding climbing, bottom bracket height and overall fit for East Coast riding? I liked the Pivot 429 for most stuff but found it a bit too grounded-planted for my liking around here. Any other bikes you might recommend looking at that match up to the Django?
    So, I loved the Django (great fit, cornered really well... in low), but rear sus was a little mushy/linear for me). Unfortunately, like the Trail 429, which also fits me really well, it too is seriously planted on the ground.

    I like the Instinct a lot. Fun, fast, capable bike, but the suspension was lacking something on technical stuff compared to DW/Split Pivot bikes.

    I ended up getting an Evil Offering (another Dave Weagle design). Really good bike for my riding: 150 fork/140 rear. Suspension just works... grips all the tech up & downs and jumps off things REALLY easily. Climbs well, hovers well, and has way better acceleration than my Switchblade. Generally, I'm less tired during and after rides on it...

    Like the Django, the Offering has a high/low setting. And like the Django, I obviously like the low setting more for cornering. However, the high setting on the Evil fits me nicely, while I felt a bit over the bar on the Django's high setting. However, I also feel a bit over the bar on a Ripley V4 and the tallboy & even the hightower... But even when I put a 150 fork on the Django (w/ 170 cranks), I couldn't get things sorted out...

    So yea, for me... Evil Offering. Very happy now. And I try hard not to be happy.

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    Thanks Jspagat, appreciate the info. I had similar thoughts-experiences on the bikes you described. Very interesting as I seem to be headed in the Evil direction as well. I'll be demo'ing the Offering this weekend to get a feel for the DELTA suspension. I'd be looking at getting an Offering or a Following. The Following would be an MB, not the latest 2020. Similar geo specs to the Pivot Trail 429 which was a great fit for me. Just a quick parking lot ride around the block on the Following MB made me shake my head at how quick and playfull it was (not able to demo that bike sadly). I tend to like the shorter travel bikes so I'll see if I like the extra travel on the Offering (and the reach) and go from there. Thanks again.

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