The WOODSTOCK thread- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 40 of 40
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    The WOODSTOCK thread

    Since Woodstock doesn't have it's own manufacturer sub-forum, I thought I'd start this thread under the "other manufacturer" sub.

    This thread can be used to keep Woodstock owners in touch with each other and as an information repository about the bikes.

    I've got a 707 I've had about two weeks. I'm 6'2" and 220-240#. I upgraded from a 1997 Schwinn S-20, because for the price upgrading the rear shock and getting my Schwinn disc capable I could get a whole new bike.

    I'll post my experiences with the bike as I have them. I've not done much but tuned it up and ride it to work. I'm hoping to get it dirty this weekend.

    So...I've got questions about replacement parts for the 707...

    1. What kind of derailleur hanger does the 707 have? Surely it's not completely proprietary. Wheels Mfg probably has a match somewhere in it's product line. Anyone know which hanger fits?

    2. What are the specs on the TruVative Powerspline BB? 68mm or 73mm diameter shell? 108, 113, or 118mm spindle?

    3. The Manitou Axel fork has a firm spring installed from Woodstock. Anyone know if there is a heavier spring available for this fork? At 225#, the fork feels a bit saggy, even with preload fully tightened.

    4. Again...me being a porker, the 160mm rotors may be a little small for extended downhills. Anyone know if the stock wheels can accommodate 185mm rotors?

    Thanks for any answers. Hopefully this thread can be of assistance to other current, potential, and future Woodstock owners.

    John
    Montgomery, AL

  2. #2

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Bicycle packaging

    My bike came essentially overnight by FedEx. I ordered it on a Saturday, so the order was shipped out on a Monday and I received it the next day. Living less than 3 hours away probably helps.

    The nothing was scratched or dinged. Every component has the owner's manual with it. Assembly was pretty easy.

    Here's some pics of the packaging...










  3. #3

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Assembly

    I am far from being truly adept at bicycle assembly and tuning, but I got the bike together and dialed in without much hassle. The included instructions walk you through step-by-step...if you choose to follow them. Being a male, I put the bike together then looked at the manual to see if I missed anything.

    Woodstock includes all the tools you need to assemble the bike. I just used my own. I bike stand helps, but is not requisite.

    If you can do these things, you can build this bike:
    - Put in a seatpost and adjust height and saddle position. EASY.
    - Turn stem forward and adjust headset/stem tension. I hate doing this, I've never been
    any good at it. Too tight...too loose. For some reason, I'm no good at this. MEDIUM
    difficulty, for me.
    - Mount handlebar to stem. EASY.
    - Adjust shifters and brake levers to personal preference. EASY.
    - Mount QR front wheel. EASY.
    At this point, the bike is together.

    Adjustments:
    - Air up the rear shock. Only took 70 psi for me to get proper sag and I'm 230#. I was surprised it took so little. I could find no "formula" for the pressure required to air up the shock in the included manual. EASY.
    - Front shock. Dial in spring preload, damping/lockout. Check oil if desired. I didn't desire. EASY.
    - Disc brakes. This is my first foray into discs. I found I am horrible at dialing them in. For me, this was the hardest part of setting the bike up. I had no experience with discs and I was tired when doing it. I almost relented and went to a shop to have this done. But I finally did it myself. Probably a no sweat proposition for most. For me MEDIUM/HARD.
    - Dial in derailleurs if necessary. The front derailleur doesn't quite throw far enough away from the big ring, leading to chain rub in the smallest two rear cogs when in the mid and big rings. Shimano's got a little tech order paper that says this is normal...no problem...I'll just treat my bike like a 21 speed. Thanks Shimano. EASY/MEDIUM/HARD depending on experience. This was no problem for me, though some folks are terrified of derailleur adjustment.

    - Check all bolts for tightness, especially the crank arms. Apparently, SRAM says they have a tendency to loosen up. EASY.
    Grab helmet and ride.

    I had some chain skip problems in the smallest cog. I broke the chain using it's quick link to check chain length. It was right on. The quick link makes this a breeze to break the chain and reassemble it. The chain ended up having some tight links. I wiggled the tight ones a bit and lubed them. The problem is a little better, but I'll have to get the chain tool out to loosen them properly. Until I formally address the problem, I just don't ride in the smallest cog.

    All in all, it was an easy build, though the discs tested my patience a bit.

  4. #4

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35
    Got the 707 out this weekend. I gotta say, I really liked the ride. It wasn't my best ride because I never got the bike completely dialed in.

    The bike shifted without problems. Rear shifting was a bit loud when really cranking the pedals, but it never missed a shift. I was quite pleased with my first SRAM experience.

    The seat was quite comfortable. I'm used to a big squishy man-friendly seat. I was pleasantly surprised the included seat didn't hurt my tailpipe.

    The only thing I didn't like, as far as the bike was concerned, was the lack of bar ends. It's no real knock on the bike, I just like bar ends.

    The back end was a little springy and occasionally felt boggy, but I had the shock aired up quite a bit past what gives the recommended sag. Due to the springy back end, I probably slowed the rebound too much, resulting in the boggy back end.

    I kept wacking my thumb knuckles on the bottom shifter levers, to the point of bleeding. Had I worn gloves, it wouldn't have been a problem. I just need to rotate the levers a bit. No big whoop.

    Lastly, by the end of the ride, my hands and arms were killing me. I just need to dial in my fore/aft seat position, stem length, and handlebar height.

    Overall, I'm happy as hello with my purchase. It's a good bike for the price. Easy to assemble. Rides well.

    The only flaws, if you want to call them that, are no bar ends (cheap easy fix) and the front front derailleur needs to throw a few millimeters further outward (Shimano says it's OK...so it must be fine, right?). For fat guys like me, the fork is a bit soft, even with the preinstalled Firm spring. Skinny guys...and gals wouldn't have a problem. Surprising, the rear shock is surviving my incessant love for beer and pizza.

    IMO, you'd be hard pressed to find a better FS bike for the money.

  5. #5

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22
    Nice I found this thread.

    Can you post a pic of the bike fully assembled? Its a nice bike? How much time took to fully arm the whole thing?

    Need some special wrench or tool?

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22
    I forgot:
    What is the weight of the bike fully assembled?

  7. #7

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35
    I don't have any pics of it assembled. There are some here...
    http://www.woodstockbikes.com/707/707.htm (just stock company photo)
    http://www.mountainbiketales.com/reviews/707.htm (review with photos)

    Here's some other stuff...
    http://commutebybike.com/2005/11/11/...kes-interview/
    http://www.thebikegeek.com/2007/03/2...7-full-review/
    There are other reviews out there. Just google WOODSTOCK 707.

    It is about 34 pounds/15.4 kilos assembled out of the box. May not be the best measure. I weighed myself on a bathroom scale, then weighed again holding the bike and got the difference.

    Assembly took about an hour. Making initial adjustments after assembly took me about 4-6 hours, mostly due to my unfamiliarity with getting headset tension right and setting up disc brakes.

    All tools required are included. Only thing you need is a shock pump.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    Here's mine


  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    1. You can get the hangers from them. I bent one & they sent me two for free.
    2.113mm spindle, 68mm shell
    3. Not sure Manitou doesn't even list the Axel any more.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mishapman
    Since Woodstock doesn't have it's own manufacturer sub-forum, I thought I'd start this thread under the "other manufacturer" sub.

    This thread can be used to keep Woodstock owners in touch with each other and as an information repository about the bikes.

    I've got a 707 I've had about two weeks. I'm 6'2" and 220-240#. I upgraded from a 1997 Schwinn S-20, because for the price upgrading the rear shock and getting my Schwinn disc capable I could get a whole new bike.

    I'll post my experiences with the bike as I have them. I've not done much but tuned it up and ride it to work. I'm hoping to get it dirty this weekend.

    So...I've got questions about replacement parts for the 707...

    1. What kind of derailleur hanger does the 707 have? Surely it's not completely proprietary. Wheels Mfg probably has a match somewhere in it's product line. Anyone know which hanger fits?

    2. What are the specs on the TruVative Powerspline BB? 68mm or 73mm diameter shell? 108, 113, or 118mm spindle?

    3. The Manitou Axel fork has a firm spring installed from Woodstock. Anyone know if there is a heavier spring available for this fork? At 225#, the fork feels a bit saggy, even with preload fully tightened.

    4. Again...me being a porker, the 160mm rotors may be a little small for extended downhills. Anyone know if the stock wheels can accommodate 185mm rotors?

    Thanks for any answers. Hopefully this thread can be of assistance to other current, potential, and future Woodstock owners.

    John
    Montgomery, AL

  10. #10

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35
    Irvintat: Nice bike. Looks like you done some work on it. Given the upgrades, I take it you enjoy your ride?

    What shock you have on there? What eye to eye length did you get? Or is it the stock Radium?

    How much travel that Nixon fork have?

    Looks like you can do some pretty severe biking on it.

    Thanks for the pics?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    It is the stock Radium. Rides great so I haven't changed it. The Nixon has 115-145mm travel. Can set it low for XC or let it out for more severe stuff. Nothing too crazy though
    it pedals great! Just did a weekend at Tsali with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mishapman
    Irvintat: Nice bike. Looks like you done some work on it. Given the upgrades, I take it you enjoy your ride?

    What shock you have on there? What eye to eye length did you get? Or is it the stock Radium?

    How much travel that Nixon fork have?

    Looks like you can do some pretty severe biking on it.

    Thanks for the pics?

  12. #12

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Front derailleur rubbing

    This front derailleur chain rub is starting to bug me a bit.

    I know Shimano says to not ride in the higher gears, but the more I ride, the crappier that becomes. My limit screw is out as far as it will go. Any ideas how to fix it?

    I've also noticed while looking down over the chain ring that it isn't tracking exactly straight. It looks like as the chain ring rotates, the chain has a small degree of lateral movement. Could this mean the crank isn't completely centered and set on the spindle?

    Any other 707 riders noticing this up front?

    Thanks,

  13. #13

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Woodies on sale

    Woody 707s are on sale. Looks like the 16 and 18 inch frames are sold out...

    But they are having volume discounts on 20 inchers. Buy 2 they are $594 each. Buy 3 or more and they are $489 each. If I had disposable income, I'd buy a few and sell them on eBay.

    It's only a matter of time before they start discounting the 20 inchers outright and I begin wishing I held out on buying for a few more months. I'm going to puke if their 2008s have a better paint job and better parts.

    I've been working on compiling a list of component weights for the 707. It won't be completely accurate, as I've pulled the weights of the net. All I need is the frame weights. I'm just not dedicated enough to break it down just to weigh the bare frame.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    475
    Well crap. I was waiting for my government check to show up before I bought an 18". Looks like I'm stuck with e-bay and craigslist used bikes.

  15. #15

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Woodstock 707 derailleur hanger replacement

    Woodstock sent me a new derailleur hanger free of charge. Can you dig that?

    Looks like Wheels Mfg hanger #38 may be a match if Woodstock stops stocking the hangers.

    Wheels Mfg:


    Woodstock:

  16. #16

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35
    Well, the bulk price of $489 is now off the table. They still have 20" frames in quantities of 2 or more for $594. I bet we'll see some Woodstocks on E-bay here soon.

  17. #17

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Loose Truvativ Crank Bolts - Warning is valid

    When Woodstock says the Truvativ cranks have a tendency to come loose, they aren't lying.

    Since I noticed my little big ring wobble, I gave the crank a once over. I was going to pull it off just to take a look at the BB. It was so loose I pulled it off while threading the crank pulling tool on. One more ride to work and I would have had major problems (laughs).

    So...take the loosen crank bolt problem seriously.

    Got some measured weights of components today too. I'll be putting my list up soon.

  18. #18

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2

    ... and if we just ... The Woodstock 707 is a good investment.

    I think I got the last 16" 707 and it arrived last Friday. I live in North Dakota and I ordered on Tuesday and it still made it by friday! I found the bike easy to assemble and dial in. I am a heavy rider at 5'11" and 250#. I find the crankset to move alot while I am riding causing the front derailleur to make noise. I have a new crankset on the way. I was able to get the BB5 disk brakes to work pretty good but there is a break in period before they really begin to work. The Radium shock works pretty good as well once you get the sag set. Because I am a Clyde the fork is pretty flexable and on my list of things to replace. I am also not very fond of the pedals and have a pair mallets on the way. I have recently ridden a Specialized Enduro SL and a Trek EX8 and though they were definatly nicer not $1500 to $2400 nicer. I find the 707 to be a very nice ride. I handles well, pedals easy, pedal bob isn't too bad! It rides like it is a 28# bike not a 34# bike! I can't wait to see the 2008 version!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    Congrats! You'll love it. The 707 is a fun bike. The Blaze does flex a lot... at least it did with me. I put LX cranks on mine. What did you get?

    Quote Originally Posted by reimerj
    I think I got the last 16" 707 and it arrived last Friday. I live in North Dakota and I ordered on Tuesday and it still made it by friday! I found the bike easy to assemble and dial in. I am a heavy rider at 5'11" and 250#. I find the crankset to move alot while I am riding causing the front derailleur to make noise. I have a new crankset on the way. I was able to get the BB5 disk brakes to work pretty good but there is a break in period before they really begin to work. The Radium shock works pretty good as well once you get the sag set. Because I am a Clyde the fork is pretty flexable and on my list of things to replace. I am also not very fond of the pedals and have a pair mallets on the way. I have recently ridden a Specialized Enduro SL and a Trek EX8 and though they were definatly nicer not $1500 to $2400 nicer. I find the 707 to be a very nice ride. I handles well, pedals easy, pedal bob isn't too bad! It rides like it is a 28# bike not a 34# bike! I can't wait to see the 2008 version!

  20. #20

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2

    Planned Upgrades

    I ordered a Truvativ Hussefelt crankset to replace the Blaze, an X-9 front derailluer to replace the Deore (the chain rub is driving me crazy). Now I am just trying to find a good deal on a good fork.

    Quote Originally Posted by irvintat
    Congrats! You'll love it. The 707 is a fun bike. The Blaze does flex a lot... at least it did with me. I put LX cranks on mine. What did you get?

  21. #21

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35
    Let us know how that front derailleur replacement goes. I hope it KO's that chain rub.

    Quote Originally Posted by reimerj
    I ordered a Truvativ Hussefelt crankset to replace the Blaze, an X-9 front derailluer to replace the Deore (the chain rub is driving me crazy). Now I am just trying to find a good deal on a good fork.

  22. #22

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Wheel Weights

    OK, so I finally got around to weighing the wheelset. I used a hokie old fishing scale so I'm sure the measurements HAVE to be off. Do these numbers pass the two finger stink test?

    Front - 5+ pounds
    (stock front wheel [incl. tube and tire] with rotor and QR)

    Rear - 6+ pounds
    (stock rear wheel [incl. tube and tire] with rotor, QR, and cassette)

    Looks like the wheels offer a great opportunity to loose weight.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    I switched to an X7 & it got rid of it completely.......

    Quote Originally Posted by Mishapman
    Let us know how that front derailleur replacement goes. I hope it KO's that chain rub.

  24. #24

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35
    EXCELLENT. I know where some of my IRS stimulus money is going now.

    Quote Originally Posted by irvintat
    I switched to an X7 & it got rid of it completely.......

  25. #25

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Link to Woodstock 707 component weights

    Here's a link to the component weights I have for the 707

    http://www.geocities.com/mishap_jlm/indexold.htm

  26. #26

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    4

    Chain Rubbing

    Quote Originally Posted by Mishapman
    Let us know how that front derailleur replacement goes. I hope it KO's that chain rub.

    I took my to the local shop and the mechanic said it was off slightly. He adjusted it and it hasn't rubbed a bit since.

  27. #27

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35

    Fork, shock, and rotor upgrade questions

    Could a 120mm travel fork be put on the 707 without screwing with the ride too much?

    Would there be any problem putting a Cane Creek Cloud Nine or Fox RP23 in the back? I haven't removed the Radium to measure the eye-to-eye measurement. I took an on-bike WAG measurement. It came to about 190mm. Does 190mm sound right?

    Can this bike take larger rotors, given appropriate mounting adapters? The stock fork leg looks to parallel the rotor plane, so I think a larger rotor would fit. The rear tube in back angles inward which may limit the size of rotor in the back. Anyone put larger rotors in the back yet?
    >>>According to Answer customer service....the largest rotor the Axel will take is 185mm
    Last edited by Mishapman; 05-23-2008 at 11:48 AM.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    I think mine rides better with a longer fork. For me the 145 is great for downhill stuff & 125 seems to be the magic number for climbing. The head angle with my Nixon set at 120mm is about 69 & at 145 it's about 67.5... So not a huge change from the 71 or 71.5 (depending on your frame size).
    Answer has the radium Rs having 190, 200, & 210 eye to eye. Mine looks like 190.........
    http://www.manitoumtb.com/guides/Sho...2%3A53%3A27+PM




    Quote Originally Posted by Mishapman
    Could a 120mm travel fork be put on the 707 without screwing with the ride too much?

    Would there be any problem putting a Cane Creek Cloud Nine or Fox RP23 in the back? I haven't removed the Radium to measure the eye-to-eye measurement. I took an on-bike WAG measurement. It came to about 190mm. Does 190mm sound right?

    Can this bike take larger rotors, given appropriate mounting adapters? The stock fork leg looks to parallel the rotor plane, so I think a larger rotor would fit. The rear tube in back angles inward which may limit the size of rotor in the back. Anyone put larger rotors in the back yet?

  29. #29

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    4

    What The &^%$^%

    To all,
    I wish someone would take over the Woodstock name and continue the bikes. If you hadn't checked their Website zThey closed down this weekend Good luck to all and I hope everyone keeps the blog going.

  30. #30

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    35
    Well crap. Now I know I should have waited for the 2008 to come out. Watch me be the first to twist a frame. Ugh.

    At least I was right about the aftermarket derailleur hanger replacement.

    Best of luck to Jim and Libby.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    29
    Got two of the last ones! My wife and I love them and at the blowout price for two this bike is a complete and total steal.

    Hopefully this forum will remain active even after the demise of "Woodstock bikes".

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    no regrets here. I"m positive I will have years of fun on this bike... Taking it to Dupont this weekend. might post some pictures when I get back.

  33. #33

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    75
    Anyone know why they shut down? I was really debating over the 707.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    29
    I don't know...I think it's a pretty tough market.

    I love the 707. My wife and I are 6' and 6'1 respectively and the larges are perfect. It's a very comfy bike and it outclasses the Iron Horse HollowPoint with DW-link suspension I owned previously. I built that Hollowpoint to the tune of $1600 and though it had XTR mechs, the 707 is overall spec'd better and honestly offers a superior ride.

    I was bummed to see them go out of business, but once you see the frame and how it's built like a brick sh!t house, the voiding of the lifetime warranty
    on the frame is made a little bit more ok...I guess.

    I think total for two bikes shipped we paid $1189 or something...less than $600 per bike...there was nothing in the Boston bike stores close to this until $1000-1300 range. It's was also nice to find out that in person the bike looks really nice, too!

    I was happy to buy two!

  35. #35

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    75
    I wonder what they did with all the inventory? Surely they didn't sell them all???

  36. #36

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    4

    Woodstock Frame find

    I was looking on the internet last night and found a Kona: Dawg Deluxe. The frame looks exactly like the Woodstock 707. If anybody gets a chance look it up and tell me what you think. I have been shredding a lot of trails lately and the bike is working flawlessly.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    29
    I looked it up and, indeed the 2005 and 2006 Dawg line frames look very, very similar to the 707. The 4-bar rear link liiks a bit different but the front triangle tubing and geometry look really really close.

    Good luck!


    Quote Originally Posted by GWWHITE
    I was looking on the internet last night and found a Kona: Dawg Deluxe. The frame looks exactly like the Woodstock 707. If anybody gets a chance look it up and tell me what you think. I have been shredding a lot of trails lately and the bike is working flawlessly.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    A little late, but enjoy...





  39. #39

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    4

    Awesome Pics

    We don't have much beauty like that here in Texas. I grew up in British Columbia part of my life and miss that kind of beauty. If you ever get to Texas We could get together and go for a ride. On my next ride I will try and get some pics to post. We need to keep the forum alive and well.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    Absolutely. Always up for riding somewhere new. Same goes to you if you are ever in NC. Can't wait to see the pictures.

    Quote Originally Posted by GWWHITE
    We don't have much beauty like that here in Texas. I grew up in British Columbia part of my life and miss that kind of beauty. If you ever get to Texas We could get together and go for a ride. On my next ride I will try and get some pics to post. We need to keep the forum alive and well.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.