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  1. #1
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    Pivot Mach 5 - Random Tidbits

    Just got done test riding a Mach 5, parking lot type riding, no dirt , but fun bouncing through curbs, cobbles and a schoolyard nonetheless. I definitely want to demo one on the trails, but the LBS won't have one for a proper demo session 'til the end of February.

    A little background: I'm currently looking for that do-it-all machine. Something in the 5-6" travel range that'll handle everything on the Front Range from the buff to the burly. I have a short list of bikes, one of which is the Mach 5. Again, keep in mind that the following is a "parking lot" test, and I'm not a professional bike tester, so have your grain of salt handy.

    First off, this is a bike that is completely on the "XC" side of things. It is light and responsive. A little body english goes a long way. I didn't think it was twitchy in any way, but it's not a bulldozer like most bikes in this travel range. It's easy to imagine, with the taut suspension and sharp handling, how one could get into trouble at speed though a rough, techy section, and personally, I wouldn't ever run the fork shorter than 140mm. The suspension is smooth and controlled, but not plush, a Corvette, not a Cadillac. As people have posted before, it doesn't feel like a 5+" travel bike. Pedal response is instant and I couldn't see the shock moving at all when I stood up and sprinted, no matter which of the 3 chainrings I was in. (For reference, I go about 180lbs, and we had 140psi in the shock.) At the same time, the suspension still worked smoothly when I pedaled up curbs and such, no feedback to speak of. The RP23 had the lowest ProPedal setting sticker, but I'm wondering if having Push completely remove the PP (if possible) would make this bike use it's travel better? Questions to ask after a full-on dirt demo, I guess.

    The medium fit me (at 5'10") pretty well. The bike had a TALAS @ 140mm and an XT kit (which was very nice overall) and a 110mm stem. I'd switch to a 90-100mm before taking the bike out for a longer dirt test. Tire clearance was very good with a 2.35 Smallblock 8 on the back and the bike has a stiff and solid feel to it. The welds at the headtube and toptube/seattube were very nice, but the frame welds where the seatpost attached to the linkage hood looked a bit like toothpaste. The bolt on front derailleur was cool, I don't really have an opinion on the integrated BB, but I absolutely hate integrated headsets. They simply make no sense to me on any bike but a full-on XC racer, and even then, why??. If this bike makes it to the final cut, I'll have to see if it's possible to make some headset adapters.

    Just to keep things in perspective, I jumped on an '08 Yeti 575 right after I climbed off the Pivot. The difference is night and day. The Yeti felt super plush, stable and wanted to carve turns. It just felt like a bike that just wants to go fast and have fun, hitting every jump on the way down. It did, however bob a bit and felt sluggish when I hit the pedals. The Pivot feels controlled and responsive and accelerates when the pedals turn. I was very impressed that I could never see the shock moving when I was pedaling, standing or seated.

    Verdict: if your idea of do-it-all includes lots of climbing, tight singletrack and a little XC or Super D racing on the side, this is a very capable bike. If you're planning on hitting the lifts or jumping off of anything you can find, I'd look elsewhere. This is not a forgiving big-hit bike. There are a lot of bikes out there (like the 575) that are plusher and more stable at speed. If Pivot can keep the pedal qualities of the Mach 5 and make the suspension plusher, it would be a truly amazing bike.

    Two final bits: according to the salesman, MSRP on the frames is $1895, only fully built-up bikes are available at the moment, and the frames are made in Taiwan. And as Forrest Gump said, "that's all I'm gonna say 'bout that."
    Last edited by coolhandluchs; 01-13-2008 at 08:59 PM.

  2. #2
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    just for ref.


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    5 inch, race-ready DW-linked bike. Mmmmm...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolhandluchs
    Verdict:...
    Good writeup.

    I will be curious to see what you think after some serious rock-garden time.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  5. #5
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    Those XT WH-M775's are well sexy. I am saving for a set for my bike.

    That Pivot's a nice looking bike though. I think there was a write-up on it in this years Interbike Dirt Demo on here somewhere. I think it got pretty good feedback.

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    Reply from Chris Cocalis

    First, thanks for the cool post on our Mach 5 bike. We are jazzed that people are excited about our bikes. I wanted to give a little feedback to some of the comments and provide some more in depth information on the bike that will make it to our website soon, but for now, this will be the first real public forum to hear it.

    The ride: The “5” inch travel segment covers some pretty broad territory. You have bikes from 4.75 to almost 6” falling within the realm and ride goals that are even more varied. This is the category where bike companies are trying to design the “one” bike that can do it all. Unfortunately, you can’t do it all. To us, a 5” travel bike that is super plush kills off the entire epic, long ride, go anywhere focus of what a 5” travel bike should be. If you lean towards the ski resort/north shore/ more extreme type of riding, then get a 6” travel bike and build it up light. The Mach 5 has 140mm (5.5”) of travel and is meant to cover the spectrum of 24 hour racing to all day in the saddle rides, with the ability to devour technical descents. As was noted from the parking lost test ride, this bike doesn’t bob under power and it isn’t real squishy feeling (we like highly technical terms like squishy). What you can’t tell in a parking lot is that the Mach 5 absolutely comes alive at speed (even in rock gardens which we have tons of in AZ). We have tested this bike from South Mountain’s National Trail to Moab’s Porcupine Rim. There are certainly longer travel bikes that are plusher, but it’s all about controlled travel. The Mach 5 holds its line at speed and always seems to have extra travel in reserve for big hits, big drops, and even the occasional big jump. Look at the Pivot site in the not too distant future and we will expand on what makes this bike such an incredible peddler yet allows it to really soak up the bumps and drops at mid to high speeds. Also, just as a couple other points of reference. The head angle with the fork at 140mm travel is 69 degrees. This is a nice stable number for handling very technical terrain. When the fork is dropped to 120, the head angle is at 70 degrees which puts the bike in stable handling XC to moderate technical territory. Additionally, with the DW Link and the shock we are using (2.25” stroke on a medium frame), it is imperative to run 30% sag (.675”). Most people are used to running less because other bikes need to have more air to keep from bobbing. NOT THIS ONE! The Mach 5 is all about achieving a balance in what we believe to be the perfect combination of incredible pedaling efficiency and frame stiffness with a controlled feel throughout the stroke and enough travel to keep our customers grinning from ear to ear in even some of the most technical terrain.
    Welds: The Mach 5 uses a combination of traditional welds and smooth welds. The smooth welds on some bikes are polished out after being completed (a la Cannondale). We like the flat bead look of the smooth weld as it is laid down. We use it near on the top tube shock tab area to keep things smooth and snag free and on other areas because it actually reduces stress risers and makes for a nice strong joint.
    Headset: We tend to agree that integrated headsets are not necessarily the best choice for a mountain bike. They have proven reasonably durable, but if anything does go wrong, your frame is the headset race and it can take a beating without easy replacement. The Mach 5 and Mach 4 do not use an integrated headset. It uses a zero stack standard headset. This headset takes cups just like a normal external 1.125 headset. However, the head tube is significantly larger in diameter and the entire headset cup fits inside. We did this for a couple of good reasons. First, as forks get longer and tires grow bigger, the front end heights continue to skyrocket. This is not such a problem for a 6 foot tall person, but for just about everyone else (particularly the under 5’ 8” crowd), this headset design reduces the front end height by over 1” because the cups are inside. It works great on the Mach 4 and Mach 5 and will prove to be a huge benefit on a future 29er as well. The second reason is that a big diameter head tube is that it is simply stronger and allows more surface area to weld to. It’s a nice secondary benefit that really makes the front end of the bike look nice as well. The zero stack design is available in headsets from Cane Creek, Ritchey, FSA, and others. They make it in their top models with the same bearings that are in the external headsets. The cups press in and/or remove just like a traditional headset. We have even spoken to Chris King about this standard and unlike his stance against integrated headsets, he finds this route much more appealing. We have to agree.


    Sincerely,

    Chris Cocalis

    President/CEO, Pivot Cycles/BH USA LLC.

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    Good post

    Thanks for the clarification on the headset issue. Hopefully I'll be able to take a 5 for a spin and see how it handles at speed in the rough...if the snow ever melts.

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    Thanks for chiming in on this thread Chris - great information in your post!

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    Chris,
    Can you offer any time-frame for the 29er?
    "... displays the social skills of a barrel cactus." - TNC

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    Is there any plans to export to UK or is there any dealers or importers already in the UK?

    Thanks for taking the time to post Chris, can’t wait to take one for a spin.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Titus Maximus
    Chris,
    Can you offer any time-frame for the 29er?
    +1?

  12. #12
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    It'd be nice to know what shock size they have on the small frames. I'm afraid that PC is using a 1.5" stroke shock on the small frame.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  13. #13
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    Pivot Mach 5 small = 7.5" x 2.0 stroke, I do believe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Titus Maximus
    Chris,
    Can you offer any time-frame for the 29er?
    +2.


    4" travel in black will be just perfect.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolhandluchs
    Two final bits: according to the salesman, MSRP on the frames is $1895, only fully built-up bikes are available at the moment,
    Good review, and just FYI, went into an LBS in San Francisco yesterday and they had Mach 4 and Mach 5 frame sets and one built up Mach 4.
    Don't harsh my mello

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckc1971
    +2.


    4" travel in black will be just perfect.
    +3, but I'd prefer 5"; they're plenty of 4" options already.
    "I'll disintegrate over time if I expect my body to try to keep up with my mind" -BM

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  17. #17
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    ++ for the 29er. 4" would be fine. It would be nice to see more bikes with less than diving board length chainstays.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtroy
    ++ for the 29er. 4" would be fine. It would be nice to see more bikes with less than diving board length chainstays.
    +5

    Quote Originally Posted by EGF168
    Is there any plans to export to UK or is there any dealers or importers already in the UK?
    +1

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    +4, or did I miss this somewhere?

    Joe

    Quote Originally Posted by el-cid
    +3, but I'd prefer 5"; they're plenty of 4" options already.
    --
    Joe Partridge

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe_Jitsu
    +4, or did I miss this somewhere?

    Joe
    mtroy did a ++ but without a number, you're out of sync you should be at +6!

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    The only thing I don't like is that they're made in Taiwan. What's the point of supporting the local, innovative bike companies if they're going to export the production?

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    Quote Originally Posted by grhill5
    The only thing I don't like is that they're made in Taiwan. What's the point of supporting the local, innovative bike companies if they're going to export the production?
    So you're willing to pay $2500 for a Pivot frame? I'm sure some people would, but a lot of people couldn't or wouldn't. To completely misquote (I believe it was) Keith Bontrager: high quality, low cost, made in the US; pick any two.

    There's also the question of who in the US would handle production? SAPA's the only US company I know of that can do large volume production on bikes, and some days they have trouble enough meeting demand on the lines they already have. Forget about doing it in house. Most bike designers want to design and ride great bikes, not deal with production issues and possibly go into seven-figure debt tooling up. Every (OK, maybe not every) higher-end company that's tried in-house has ended up outsourcing once demand picked up, usually to Taiwan, sometimes to SAPA. Yeti and Titus are just two examples.

    AFAIK, some of the parts are machined here in the states, the tubing and welding's done overseas. I believe assembly's done in the US as well. Like most industries, it's a joint effort. Somebody please correct me if I'm wrong. From a quality standpoint, there's no difference. From an environmental perspective...well, let's just say I'm not a fan of the mercury from China's smokestacks piling up in our snowpack. Between the mercury, the lead paint and mind-altering chemicals in kids' toys, and the not-so-good-for-your-pet food, I'm just about convinced that they are trying to kill us, but that could just be my paranoid side talking.

    Or is it?

    [/SOAPBOX]

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolhandluchs
    Keith Bontrager: high quality, low cost, made in the US; pick any two.
    Not quite. Cheap, Light, Strong... pick 2. Not sure if it was keith or gary that actually said that though.

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    I'm still keeping an eye on the weather so we can demo a Mach 5 here. By the way guys, I don't think it was Cris C. responding above; just a guy who works for Orbea or Pivot.

    Anyway, this bike may be too XC-ish for me. It sounds even more XC-ish than the Turner Flux and Titus Motolite and that while that may be heaven for a XC Racer coming off a Hardtail or a short-travel bike like the Racer-X, it may not be for those of us who consider bikes like the Spot, 575, Endorphin, Ciclon, etc to be all-day bikes.

    I'd consider it as a second bike but given my propensity to stay away from steep angles and short wheelbases (I like to relax and enjoy my ride after four hrs in the saddle) this one may seem to be a better fit for..well, not me anyway.

    Dan- I'm still up for a demo though. Those are always fun but I think I may stay away from Dakota Ridge and Apex on this one

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    Quote Originally Posted by mud'n'sweat
    Not quite. Cheap, Light, Strong... pick 2.
    That's why I typed: "To completely misquote (I believe it was) Keith Bontrager: high quality, low cost, made in the US; pick any two."

    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Dan- I'm still up for a demo though.
    I'm tossing around the idea. Still debating between the Tomac Snyper and the Mach 5. The Snyper's more in that 5 Spot/575 type class, but without that middle-ring pedaling bounce, so you may want to check one out. The Lakewood Treads has a large in stock, which I've already ridden, but I'm waiting for them to get a medium in before laying out any money. If I decide to demo either bike, I'll PM you.

    All I know is I gotta get somethin' fairly quick. The Fruita Fat Tire Fest is coming up quick.
    Speaking of which, it looks like Pivot will have a demo trailer there this year.
    Troy & Chris should be paying me for this.

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    Pivot Guy

    That was Chris Cocalis responding, BTW. I just posted on my account for him. I work for Chris (used to work at Orbea)

    If anyone has any questions, feel free to e-mail me: [email protected]. I'll refrain from joining in the debate about wheelbases and manufacturing.

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    Understood, Adam. I just meant that it was someone typing his response and that he wasn't getting all these responses in his personal email or anything like that.

    Smart of you to refrain and not get too defensive. Good move!

    Dan- I already have a 2007 Turner Spot that I love riding. I was looking for a second ride- either something along the lines of a light 29er or a light XC bike with slightly slacker angles (Yeti ASR, for example).

    I have developed a serious aversion to steep angles and overly-high BBs and short wheelbases, especially when they are all packed into one bike. I was okay with that in the Midwest but here in Colorado, it could be a deathtrap for me and I want to live

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolhandluchs
    That's why I typed: "To completely misquote

    Doh!

    I just got self'd!

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    Those Pivots look goood

    Great response from Chris Cocalis, very informative.

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    Fair enough on the Bontrager quote/ sentiment. I'm making a decision next week and I'm torn between the Mach 5 at one end and a Motolite Exogrid at the other. Seems like an apples and oranges comparison I know. Any thoughts or comments are appreciated. -GRH

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by grhill5
    The only thing I don't like is that they're made in Taiwan. What's the point of supporting the local, innovative bike companies if they're going to export the production?
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...46387#poststop

    From this thread, http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=144208
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

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    Man oh man, why would you make somebody read all that drivel...

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    Quote Originally Posted by grhill5
    I'm making a decision next week and I'm torn between the Mach 5 at one end and a Motolite Exogrid at the other. Seems like an apples and oranges comparison I know. Any thoughts or comments are appreciated. -GRH
    Check out this thread for a Spot/Motolite/Mach 5 comparison. It's just one person's opinion, but it may give you some idea of what to expect.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    I have developed a serious aversion to steep angles and overly-high BBs and short wheelbases, especially when they are all packed into one bike. I was okay with that in the Midwest but here in Colorado, it could be a deathtrap for me and I want to live
    I hear ya man. The design is top notch and I want to love the bike, but if it don't fit it don't fit.

    Designers today are stuck on short wheelbases because they are under the illusion the bikes turn quicker. This is simply not true. Turning is about technique and short wheelbased bikes are not as stable. that is a period after that sentence.

    I am on a Cannondale because they are about the only manufacturer that has a clue about geometry. It is long and I rule in the corners. At 6'4" I should be having to work to keep up with my shorter fellow expert racers, but it is the other way around. Go figure.

    Adit: The reason, as I see it, that a longer bike is better at cornering is because you can get your center of gravity lower. This done without a long stem makes a bike that is a good decender as well. So, a long wheelbase bike is more stable at speed, corners better, better at downhill.
    Last edited by yogiprophet; 03-18-2008 at 09:39 AM.

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    Some extra bits

    Just found a nice little write-up about the Pivot offices on the Speedgoat blog. Not anything earth-shattering, I just read it for the pictures.

    http://www.speedgoat.com/blog.asp?p=1397

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    Cool, I'm actually glad that Chris Cocalis is back in the biz. Pivot will do quite well, in my opinion. They just need to sort out a few things, toss in a 29er or two, and then gain some more traction through dealers.

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    Under severe peer pressure, I have decided to wait (or try valiantly) till the Pivot 29-er comes out. Then I'll look at both Pivots, the El Rey, and a couple of others as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Under severe peer pressure, I have decided to wait (or try valiantly) till the Pivot 29-er comes out. Then I'll look at both Pivots, the El Rey, and a couple of others as well.
    Waiting is difficult my friend. You will end up spontaneously combusting and then call someone who knows how to hook you up

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    You speak wise words, All Mountain. I hope my new-found discipline helps me avoid that spontaneous phone call. I have done well so far and have had only one bike for over six months. That hasn't been the case for the last four years before that

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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    Waiting is difficult my friend. You will end up spontaneously combusting and then call someone who knows how to hook you up

    and I make it even more difficult for him, right Flyer?

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    Yes, you are as helpful as one addict is to another

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Yes, you are as helpful as one addict is to another


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    Quote Originally Posted by crisillo

    LOL......Criss you've fallen into my old habit of buying by bulk quantity in order to save money and now you're trying to get Flyer to succumb to that practical business sense as well. I've been clean and sober from UGI for almost 4 months now........Geez, I should write a book on how to be content with what you have and not with what you want
    "Can I put a Totem on a FTM?".....Originally Posted by All Mountain

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiEndo
    LOL......Criss you've fallen into my old habit of buying by bulk quantity in order to save money and now you're trying to get Flyer to succumb to that practical business sense as well. I've been clean and sober from UGI for almost 4 months now........Geez, I should write a book on how to be content with what you have and not with what you want



    you have only lasted that long because you are not really sure of what you want next

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    Ti, I'm proud of you. I have been clean and sober for six months (except for random purchases of tires). Yeah, Cris is a terrible influence but he is well-meaning unlike that ratfaced liar, Fo.

    I'm wise and disciplined today.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by crisillo


    you have only lasted that long because you are not really sure of what you want next
    Really.........I have no wants........I am content with life itself..........in fact I was gonna use the money I save to build a small bamboo water fountain in my back yard so I can meditate and be content with what I have........
    "Can I put a Totem on a FTM?".....Originally Posted by All Mountain

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiEndo
    Really.........I have no wants........I am content with life itself..........in fact I was gonna use the money I save to build a small bamboo water fountain in my back yard so I can meditate and be content with what I have........

  48. #48
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    Warm up your credit card

    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Under severe peer pressure, I have decided to wait (or try valiantly) till the Pivot 29-er comes out. Then I'll look at both Pivots, the El Rey, and a couple of others as well.
    Meditation has its privileges. Looks like the waiting's almost over. Check out the homepage...
    http://www.pivotcycles.com/

    Oops, looks like I was about 14 hrs behind the ball. http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=394162
    Last edited by coolhandluchs; 03-21-2008 at 07:58 AM.

  49. #49
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    Got a chance to pedal around a parking lot on a production Pivot Mach-5 today, which fit me very well with a stubby 50mm stem and low rise bars. And since I last rode the prototype Mach-5 at Interbike it was definitely refined to be smoother and more balanced in handling.

    It felt like the special OEM only softer rp23 was smoother jumping and hitting curbs than the aftermarket rp23 on the Interbike prototypes, not as plush and compliant as the Mojo or MKiii but the linear rear compression rate matched it’s firmly damped Talas very nicely, much like a bigger longer wheelbase Racer-X with softer suspension very close to the Moto-Lite but smoother pedaling in bumps and even sharper acceleration, it’s on the XC side of enduro but a little on the heavy side for endurance racing.

    The frame and rear end feels much stiffer than the fork and begs for a stiffer feeling 20mm axle fork. The steering is now more relaxed than the Interbike prototype, 69 degrees, the same as my Mojo parked next to the Mack-5, that is perfectly balanced for 5.5 inch travel, and the short stem really felt quick steering without being cramped in fit for my 6’1 height.

    The BB height is just right for rough trail climbing pedal clearance at 13.8, not to high for great handling and not too low for good clearance on more difficult trails.

    The solid weight picking it up probably means this Pivot is very durable, like all the previous Titus designs by Chris Cocalis.

    I can find nothing missing that I’d want for riding extremely rough trails, this bike felt quick, smooth, taut like a strong bow, and very well balanced - the Pivot Mack-5 has no weakness.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    The solid weight picking it up probably means this Pivot is very durable, like all the previous Titus designs by Chris Cocalis.
    Have to agree with most of the points in Derby's review. A frame this stiff just begs for a thru-axle fork, which is why I have a Pike Dual-air keeping the frame company at the moment. They're becoming best friends while waiting for the snow and mud to disappear.

    My medium anodized frame, with the BB, seat collar and derailleur mounting bolts in place weighs in at a solid 6.75 lbs...very comforting for someone like me who's pushing 190 these days. What's even better is that the weight feels like it's gathered around the BB area. The whole bike should come in around 29 lbs, despite a more "enduro" build kit. I'm jones'n hard to get some dirt under the tires, just as soon as my Supercomps and Dusters come in so I can build the wheels. Waiting sucks, even more than paying off the credit cards...

  51. #51
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    I'm glad Chris didn't go for a superlight frame- I have yet to ride one that isn't flexy and I was confident that one way or another, no frame Chris builds will be flexy- my pet peeve and one I find cripples some otherwise great designs.

    Kudos to Chris for staying true to durable and stiff frame design and Dan, I look forward to seeing your Mach 5 soon. You will have to hit GM with a couple of us who are just waking up from winter hibernation. The last ride was ridiculously slow so if you are in the same shape, you will dig riding with us. Hurry and get that thing built up and PM me. Again, congratulations!

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolhandluchs
    Have to agree with most of the points in Derby's review. A frame this stiff just begs for a thru-axle fork, which is why I have a Pike Dual-air keeping the frame company at the moment. They're becoming best friends while waiting for the snow and mud to disappear.

    My medium anodized frame, with the BB, seat collar and derailleur mounting bolts in place weighs in at a solid 6.75 lbs...very comforting for someone like me who's pushing 190 these days. What's even better is that the weight feels like it's gathered around the BB area. The whole bike should come in around 29 lbs, despite a more "enduro" build kit. I'm jones'n hard to get some dirt under the tires, just as soon as my Supercomps and Dusters come in so I can build the wheels. Waiting sucks, even more than paying off the credit cards...
    Road trip time! Call in sick, go in vacation time debt, whatever it takes to get down to the warming desert areas or Cali and get on that bike and ride!

    I'm very tempted to get the Mack-5, but my Mojo is no slouch and really at least as good for most of my riding near home in Cali and I prefer the more plush Mojo suspension for most of my riding and I can firm it up nearly like the Mach-5 with my nice PUSH'd compression adjustment, the low BB is my only gripe, I've got it up to 13.4 inches measured with 650b front wheel and 2.3 tires with a 140mm travel fork, so I'll hold off for a while until I find a bike than is as good and better in everyway for me.

  53. #53
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    Thanks

    I'll have to meet up in a couple of weeks. Ridiculously slow is my typical end-of-summer speed, so you guys may have to push me up GM. What I'm really looking forward to is taking this bike up to Golden Gate this summer and putting it though its paces on Mtn Lion. If there's a perfect trail system near Denver to test this bike out, it's up there. High altitude alpine riding, with all the roots and rocks you care to eat, and less than 20 minutes from Golden.

    Can't wait!

    Derby, the Mojo I demoed was very nice, but the kicker for me (other than the cost) was the sizing. The Mojo's a VERY short bike, both in cockpit and wheelbase IMO. It handled well enough, but the medium felt like a small. I would have to have gone with a large — and I never, ever fit on large bikes. The medium Mach 5 just fits better, and, like you said, the higher bottom bracket should let a clutz like me pedal through things without destroying pedals. I hear ya on the vacation thing. I'm still debating whether or not to hit the Fruita Fat Tire Fest at the end of April. The trails are a little crowded, but there's plenty of drinking to go around.
    Last edited by coolhandluchs; 03-31-2008 at 08:48 AM.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by derby
    Got a chance to pedal around a parking lot...

    I can find nothing missing that I’d want for riding extremely rough trails
    Man, that must be one ROUGH parking lot.

    Anyway, I'd love to try one again now that they have tweaked it. I have yet to ride a dw that lives up to the hype so I would be very curious to feel what others report to experience.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Man, that must be one ROUGH parking lot.
    Good point. I've test ridden so many full suspension bikes in the last 10 years I can get a good sense of differences with just a few bumps and jumps, especially being extra familiar with DW-links. And I'd ridden the prototype Mach-5 before and the differences were noticeable, especially steering/handling. The shock difference was more subtle but nicer than the aftermarket rp23 was on the bike.

    Of course it should go without saying… just my opinion!


  56. #56
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    I'm slower than ever but just cranking away is the only way to get stronger. You are welcome to ride with me anytime. I avoid by fast buddies till June. I don't need the humiliation right now

    Let me know when you go to Lion, if you want some company. I have never been there and would really like to check it out. Just PM me when you want to hit GM. I'll be riding a bit more now, even though the new job may see me putting in some long hours.

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