Help from ML-7 owners- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    Help from ML-7 owners

    I have some questions for anyone that owns a Maverick bike, specifically a ML-7.

    First a little background. I am about to take the plunge and get my first FS bike (currenty bike is a SC chameleon) and all of the reviews and hype about the ML-7 and Maverick bikes in general have me intrigued. I live in Western PA and do a majority of my riding on rocky and rooty terain with a mix of short steep hills and some nice open fire road type climbs. The bike will be used for just plain riding about 90% of the time but I do want to do some more endurance type races and I figure the FS bike will help out with my back. I have limited experience riding FS bikes, one ride on a Pscyle Werks Wild Hare and one ride on a Gary Fisher Cake, and both of these rides where out in SoCal while visiting one of my friends who moved out there. Out of these 2 rides, hands down the Cake was the better bike, it was a lighter bike and I noticed limited pedal bob compared to the Wild Hare.

    My questions are about the ML-7 and Maverick bikes in general are as follows.

    1) How are the bikes on east coast tight and twisty terrain? From the reviews I read in magazines and on the site, a lot of the riders and riding appears to have been done out west. Which from my limited SoCal riding experience the trails seem to be more wide open and not as tight and twisty and I am concerend that the bike may be a little sluggish.

    2) As I stated above this will be my main bike and I am 90% positive that the 4" should be enough travel, seeing that I ride all the trails on a hardtail now, but I would like some opinions on the amount of travel. So is 4" enough?

    Any inputs would be helpful

    Dan

  2. #2
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    Dan,

    I went from a IF to a ML7.3 with a SC32 in the front and it was a very easy change. The PPT rear end does not bob as a lot of other full squishy units. It does not need a lock out, any kind of "platform" for pedaling, and it's 2:1 ratio.

    I have not had any manuverability issues with the technical single track in Colorado. I have yet to feel the rear "bottom" out like I have with the 575/Enduro/VT/Cake/RacerX. Stiff, tons of tire clearance-enough for 2.5" easily!

    Go to thier website and you can read so much about the suspension.

    I don't think that you'll have any issues once you get settled.

    Scoty
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by banks
    Dan,

    I went from a IF to a ML7.3 with a SC32 in the front and it was a very easy change. The PPT rear end does not bob as a lot of other full squishy units. It does not need a lock out, any kind of "platform" for pedaling, and it's 2:1 ratio.

    I have not had any manuverability issues with the technical single track in Colorado. I have yet to feel the rear "bottom" out like I have with the 575/Enduro/VT/Cake/RacerX. Stiff, tons of tire clearance-enough for 2.5" easily!

    Go to thier website and you can read so much about the suspension.

    I don't think that you'll have any issues once you get settled.

    Scoty
    Scoty,

    Thanks for the input. I have been on their website a few times to read about their design and the shock but I wanted to get other peoples thoughts on it.

    One more question, how long did it take you to set up the rear shock? That is one complaint I heard from someone, that it took a little while to set it up.

    Dan

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    I'm at 200lbs and run the pressure @ 95% of riding weight and have had no problems. I think a lot of new Mav owner want to feel the massive-unridable-adjustable rebound setting for the forks & rear shocks and get confused.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  5. #5
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    I've had a ML7 for almost 3 years, and LOVE it. It is a little longer in the back than my old Rocky Mountain Team Element (with 3.6" travel). I noticed the extra length in tight singletrack the first few times I rode it. But it was a good tradeoff for a much more efficient suspension that has almost no bob and is active in both braking and pedalling. The suspension does particularly well climbing roots, rocks, or steps. I mainly trail ride with it, but have used it for a few short track races, and an endurance race. As I have it set up, it's perfect for a long race. Not as perfect for a half hour short track sprint. When I initially got the bike, I had to adjust to the extra travel front and rear, plus the extra weight. But my second real ride on it was a 3 hour race that I did very well in. Even with the extra weight, the bike was more efficient climbing than my old "race" bike. After having the bike for a while, I like the bike more and more. If I replaced the bike right now, it would be another Maverick.

    Not all is perfect though. The front derraileur was a pain to get set up initially. It works well after getting it right though.

    4" of travel is a good amount for trailriding. I';ve been happy with it for racing, trailriding, and a little bit of Northshore stuff (but not too big). But, if you want a little more, the brand new ML7/5 has 5" and weighs less than the ML7. That's what I would get now.

    BTW - most my riding has been in the Pacific NW.

    -Momentum

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by momentum
    I've had a ML7 for almost 3 years, and LOVE it. It is a little longer in the back than my old Rocky Mountain Team Element (with 3.6" travel). I noticed the extra length in tight singletrack the first few times I rode it. But it was a good tradeoff for a much more efficient suspension that has almost no bob and is active in both braking and pedalling. The suspension does particularly well climbing roots, rocks, or steps. I mainly trail ride with it, but have used it for a few short track races, and an endurance race. As I have it set up, it's perfect for a long race. Not as perfect for a half hour short track sprint. When I initially got the bike, I had to adjust to the extra travel front and rear, plus the extra weight. But my second real ride on it was a 3 hour race that I did very well in. Even with the extra weight, the bike was more efficient climbing than my old "race" bike. After having the bike for a while, I like the bike more and more. If I replaced the bike right now, it would be another Maverick.

    Not all is perfect though. The front derraileur was a pain to get set up initially. It works well after getting it right though.

    4" of travel is a good amount for trailriding. I';ve been happy with it for racing, trailriding, and a little bit of Northshore stuff (but not too big). But, if you want a little more, the brand new ML7/5 has 5" and weighs less than the ML7. That's what I would get now.

    BTW - most my riding has been in the Pacific NW.

    -Momentum
    Momentum,

    Thanks for the reply, but I have a follow up question for you. What front derraileur did you run on it?

    Dan

  7. #7
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    The best FD is the newest Shimano XTR E-Type. The ML7.3 can use a E-Type FD and I highly recommend it.
    For ML7.5& ML8 owners there is a new break through! These two Mav's have to run the Mav "D Mount" which is a FD mount which uses a braze-on Road FD. When using any MTN shifter,they all sucked until the new Flat Bar FD showed up this season. The Flat bar FD looks and acts more like a MTN FD with lower return spring rate, but is a braze on.

    Scoty
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  8. #8
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    The Shimano FD-4403 is the best braze-on road FD, designed around a 52th ring.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  9. #9
    HHL
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    7.3 Fd

    Hey Banks. Let me see if I understand this. You are saying that with the advent of a new XTR FD, which you are calling a flat bar FD(?), this will work better than the old Ultegra/Dura Ace braze-on with the Mav derailleur hanger? I have a M7.3 with XO shifters and the Ultegra braze on, and in my weak-thumb-humble opinion, it gets to be a pain to push on to the large chainring after a while. Does one still use that hanger with the down pull set up? Is it a question of the derailleur spring being easier to work? I'll go look at the Shimano site to see what you are talking about, but any info on the whys and hows of a XTR set-up that works better would be much appreciated.

  10. #10
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    What about an ML-7.5

    I have been on my ML7.3 for 2 1/2 seasons now and love it, with the DUC32 fork. I ride mostly technical singletrack/steep technical climbs in mtns west of Boulder Colorado. I think the bike was built for tight singletrack. Even with the 150mm fork it has quicker steering than many bikes.

    Have you ridden the 7.5? It uses the ML8 rear end & shock, which is a single unit and stiffer & lighter than the 7.3. Plus it has 5" rear travel. I don't have any complaints about my ML7.3....but if I were able to buy a new bike now it would be the 7.5.

    Also, I know some guys who've raced on the ML7.5 in 24hr races and did quite well. Mine is an XL and just a hair under 25lbs with 2.1 tires. I've been racing it off and on for a couple years...and like it more than my old Rocky Mtn Element for racing and for technical stuff.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    It uses the ML8 rear end & shock, which is a single unit and stiffer & lighter than the 7.3.

    The 7.5 does not share the same physical rear end as the ML8, only in design.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by HHL
    Hey Banks. Let me see if I understand this. You are saying that with the advent of a new XTR FD, which you are calling a flat bar FD(?), this will work better than the old Ultegra/Dura Ace braze-on with the Mav derailleur hanger? I have a M7.3 with XO shifters and the Ultegra braze on, and in my weak-thumb-humble opinion, it gets to be a pain to push on to the large chainring after a while.

    No.


    If you want to or already using the MAV D Mount on your Maverick ML7.3, ML7.5 or ML8 then use the new Shimano FD-4403 instead of the 105/Ulterga/Dura Ace FD. The 4403 is designed for the Shimano Flat Bar Road Shifters. It looks like a old school bottom swing mountain bike FD. The leverage ratio & spring tension is greatly reduced; your left hand will thank you.

    If you are running your ML7.3 with a older E-Type FD, buy the newest XT or XT version.

    Scoty
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  13. #13
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    What issues with the Dura Ace FD on Maverick?

    I'm confused. I use a Maverick D mount, Dura Ace triple, SRAM twist shifters, good cables and they shift just fine. Just as easy as the Dura Ace double on my road bike. And no difference from my other bike with an XTR top swing FD.

    Re: the ML7.5 rear end... details details. Point is, it is stiffer and lighter than the 7.3. Usually it's one or the other.

  14. #14
    HHL
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    I think

    I get it Scoty. You are saying the 4403 is better than the 6603, for example (this is what I have), because of some because of some design aspect that is better for the M7 D-mount. You don't think that a big percentage of cause of the thumb effort is dependant upon the mechanism used to route the cable back up to the derailleur? I have some sort of a plastic guide as opposed to a pully system such as was on my old Schwinn Paramount ATB.

  15. #15
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    Hey dbsanta

    Quote Originally Posted by momentum
    I've had a ML7 for almost 3 years, and LOVE it. It is a little longer in the back than my old Rocky Mountain Team Element (with 3.6" travel). I noticed the extra length in tight singletrack the first few times I rode it.
    -Momentum
    One thing that I'd worry about is the chainstay length on the Mavericks. According to the geometry chart on their site, it's 17.5". As the above poster mentioned, he said that he noticed it when he first got the frame. I only point it out because in Q#1 you mentioned that you wanted a bike that ran well in tight and twisty terrain. You might want to try and get a good test ride on one of their frames to make sure that it fits your needs. I'm not trying to bag on Maverick, it just seems that you might want something with a shorter chainstay.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MINImtnbiker
    I'm confused. I use a Maverick D mount, Dura Ace triple, SRAM twist shifters, good cables and they shift just fine. Just as easy as the Dura Ace double on my road bike. And no difference from my other bike with an XTR top swing FD.

    Re: the ML7.5 rear end... details details. Point is, it is stiffer and lighter than the 7.3. Usually it's one or the other.
    No need to be confused, if the DA FD works for you, rock it. Most people don't like the high tension spring. I hated running XO grip shifters with the 105 FD. MPITA

    Nope, it's both as the 7.5 & 8 rear shock mount is welded into the rear end versus the 7.3 that has a bolted in shock mount.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by HHL
    I get it Scoty. You are saying the 4403 is better than the 6603, for example (this is what I have), because of some because of some design aspect that is better for the M7 D-mount. You don't think that a big percentage of cause of the thumb effort is dependant upon the mechanism used to route the cable back up to the derailleur?
    Thanks!

    Forgot to state, I am talking about 9 speed FDs. If you run a 10sp FD, you should run the 10 chain. A 10spd chain will be a bit more tedious to dial in shifting for the FD &RD and per Shimano, will "wear" faster.

    The cable routing has been changed to allow more of a radiai [sp] exiting versus the cable exiting from the groove at an angle of the earlier Mavs.

    The difference between the Ultergra/DA/105 versus the 4403 is the leverage ratio & the internal spring tension of the FD.
    The U/DA/105 is designed for STI road levers. The 4403 is designed for Flat Bar Road Shifters which mimmic the Mountain Pod shifters.

    The DA FD are designed to be used with a 53th big ring. U/105/Tiagra are for 52th rings and have a different cage profile and work better with the 42th big rings on the mtn cranks.

    Scoty
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  18. #18
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    Maverick's wheelie just fine. The manner in which a monolink suspension functions makes its chainstays "ride shorter".

    Though I lack the wheelie gene, I can easily get the front end up. Not as easily as with a short-stay hardtail, but easily nonetheless.

    I've seen a terrific bike handler, Mark Howe, ride a long, long, long manual at more than 30 mph on the Sovereign Trails in Moab.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbsantacruz
    I have some questions for anyone that owns a Maverick bike, specifically a ML-7.

    My questions are about the ML-7 and Maverick bikes in general are as follows.

    1) How are the bikes on east coast tight and twisty terrain? From the reviews I read in magazines and on the site, a lot of the riders and riding appears to have been done out west. Which from my limited SoCal riding experience the trails seem to be more wide open and not as tight and twisty and I am concerend that the bike may be a little sluggish.

    2) As I stated above this will be my main bike and I am 90% positive that the 4" should be enough travel, seeing that I ride all the trails on a hardtail now, but I would like some opinions on the amount of travel. So is 4" enough?

    Any inputs would be helpful

    Dan
    Hey Dan,

    I have many customers riding the ML7 on the east coast and they all love it. I also own one myself and do most of my riding in Nor Cal and tend to push the limits of what the ML7 with DUC32 fork were designed to do but still have not been let down. I have been riding this bike for the last 4.5-years in ever type of terrain imaginable from tight twisty single track to technical climbing to light Free Riding to super fast down hill. This bike absolutely does it all and with ease.

    Regarding the front derailleur, yes the new Shimano 4403 triple front derailleur does have a lighter spring action and works great. It will also work with a 9 speed chain perfectly. Also Maverick is producing an piece to replace the standard bolt on the Dura Ace or Ultegra front derailleur which extends the arm and thus makes the leverage much better providing a light and easy front derailleur shift.

    Tim

  20. #20
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    Hey ML7 riders running DUC's, do your rigs feel weird with the two extra inches of travel up front?
    I'm asking because I am considering one for my ML7/5. With that combo there is only an inch difference in the two travels, I thought the SC32 would be the perfect match for this frame because of the identical travels. I keep hearing how so many people are pleased with the DUC. It just seems weird to put a dual crown fork on a long travel XC bike that I'm going to be racing alot. Thanks in advance for the info.
    Ride it, don’t write about it!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotto
    Hey ML7 riders running DUC's, do your rigs feel weird with the two extra inches of travel up front?
    I'm asking because I am considering one for my ML7/5. With that combo there is only an inch difference in the two travels, I thought the SC32 would be the perfect match for this frame because of the identical travels. I keep hearing how so many people are pleased with the DUC. It just seems weird to put a dual crown fork on a long travel XC bike that I'm going to be racing alot. Thanks in advance for the info.
    Both feels and rides better with the DUC, no question.

  22. #22
    HHL
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    Duc!

    I really like the DUC on mine. I'm glad to lose 2 of the inches going up longer hills, however. Blasting up little rises with logs/rocks, etc., that plush 2 inches at the beginning is really nice. Conversely, because of that soft start on the DUC, I have to remember to not hit the front brake too hard when standing on the pedals. The front end feels plenty quick to me. Besides, and this is just a theory, I doubt that more than a handful of we MTB fans can really maximize the use of minimal differences on most bikes with similar purpose in mind and comprable pricing. What I'm saying is, for me, and I suspect for most, a half a degree in headangle is not going to affect my riding noticeably because I can't operate at a skill level where these minute differences can be noticed or used effectively. My margin of operator error is going to be greater than any handling difference between similar forks. So give me the comfort, the weight, the reduced travel for uphill, and I am one happy camper.
    Hope that info from a new DUC owner helps.
    Harlan

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotto
    Hey ML7 riders running DUC's, do your rigs feel weird with the two extra inches of travel up front?
    I'm asking because I am considering one for my ML7/5. With that combo there is only an inch difference in the two travels, I thought the SC32 would be the perfect match for this frame because of the identical travels. I keep hearing how so many people are pleased with the DUC. It just seems weird to put a dual crown fork on a long travel XC bike that I'm going to be racing alot. Thanks in advance for the info.
    Hey Scotto,

    I have been riding the DUC for three or so years now and LOVE it. I run a bike shop and we build a lot of really nice bikes here everyday so consequently we get to ride a lot of really nice bikes and in every possible configuration you can think of. It never fails that every time I get on a XC or AM bike and take her for a spin the thought creeps into my mind that the bike would ride nicer with a DUC. The DUC really is in a league of its own. It has the ride height of a 5-inch fork and but provides 6-inches of travel so the bike doesn’t feel any different from a geometry stand point. Where you notice it most is that you just feel like you could ride over anything and it would eat it up. This secure feeling also has to do with how rigid it is from side to side and front to back. This provides an incredibly secure feeling and allows you to simply enjoy the suspension all 6-inches it. I rarely lock my fork down. I typically only lock it down when I am doing super steep technical single track and maybe on a long steep climb.

    The SC and DUC setup with only 5-to-10mm of ride height difference depending on how much sag you are running. This amounts to less than ½ a degree in the Headtube angle but contrary to what Harlan commented on I do notice that difference. I’m a pretty experienced rider so this might have something to do with it but I do believe firmly that all bikes set up differently even if their geometry charts have them saying they should be the same. It’s kind of like driving a VW then getting driving a SUBARU. They both have a distinctly different feel when driving them even if they are model/price competitors. The SC seems a little steep in the headtube angle for my preferred AM position but if you are into really switchback style single track it might be a toss up between the two. At this point the turning radius might be the deciding factor. The DUC will turn about 80-to-82 degrees to the side best my eye can tell where the SC can turn a full 90 degrees. For me this isn’t ever an issue and I do run into switchbacks on my rides but something you may want to consider. All in all the strong points of riding the DUC far outweigh the only possible negative of full 90-deg turning in my humble opinion. Get the DUC you will LOVE it too.

    Tim
    WrenchScience.com

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    Those are some pretty positive comments about the DUC. It is that much sweeter than a SC32? Might biggest concern is the difference in front and rear travels. Heck, I see so many ML7's running a DUC though, it can't make that much of a difference. A friend of mine is running a SC on his ML 7 and he says he is thiinking of going with a DUC cuz he wants to keep up with his buddies. Guess what fork there all running? DUC!
    I'm starting to get convinced.
    Ride it, don’t write about it!

  25. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotto
    Those are some pretty positive comments about the DUC. It is that much sweeter than a SC32? Might biggest concern is the difference in front and rear travels. Heck, I see so many ML7's running a DUC though, it can't make that much of a difference. A friend of mine is running a SC on his ML 7 and he says he is thiinking of going with a DUC cuz he wants to keep up with his buddies. Guess what fork there all running? DUC!
    I'm starting to get convinced.
    Hey Scotto,

    It is that much sweeter than the SC32. Don’t get me wrong the SC32 is a very nice fork and on the ML7.3 or any other 4-inch XC full suspension frame it’s a great fit. It’s just that the DUC is out of this world great. I had my DUC on my ML7 since Fall ’02. This is pretty crazy considering I could be riding anything we sell. Most of the guys in the shop go through a couple bikes a year because they can so it is saying a lot that I have been on the ML7 for so long. I originally had a Marathon on the ML7 and it was a great fit but I was really limited with what the bike could do. The fork really makes the bike. If you set the bike up with a 4-inch fork you are pure XC. If you set it up with a 5-inch fork you can do more AM riding and still do XC. If you ride the DUC the bike will still do XC and AM and perform best in its class. 6-inches just allows you to do that much more with less effort and that means you are less fatigued and in I believe safer. The front wheel stays on the ground more and thus you have better control.

    I just sold my ML7 to get the 7.5 and guess what fork is going on it, you got it the DUC. We have built a handful of ML7.5 bikes so far and 4 out of 5 have been outfitted with the DUC and one with the SC. I am pretty sure I will be riding the ML7.5 for at least the next handful of years until I can find something better but for the time being I haven’t ridden a bike I like better.

    Regarding your buddy that is thinking about moving up to the DUC I can relate. I had this same problem with my friends every time they added another inch of travel to their rigs. All of a sudden I was getting dropped on the descents when just one ride before I was leading or right on their tails. His friends with DUC’s have 20% more travel and a slightly more upright position and that makes a noticeable positive difference. See one of the greatest things about the ML7 frame design is that it really pedals like a hardtail and the different front travels don’t have any effect on that so you might as well ride a little more travel especially considering the DUC is so light and doesn’t negatively change the geometry.

    If you want to talk about this on the phone give me a call sometime. I can be reached at work M-F, just ask for Tim.

    Cheers,
    Wrench Scientist

  26. #26
    HHL
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    Feelin' it

    Quote Originally Posted by Wrench Scientist
    Hey Scotto,

    I have been riding the DUC for three or so years now and LOVE it. I run a bike shop and we build a lot of really nice bikes here everyday so consequently we get to ride a lot of really nice bikes and in every possible configuration you can think of. It never fails that every time I get on a XC or AM bike and take her for a spin the thought creeps into my mind that the bike would ride nicer with a DUC. The DUC really is in a league of its own. It has the ride height of a 5-inch fork and but provides 6-inches of travel so the bike doesn’t feel any different from a geometry stand point. Where you notice it most is that you just feel like you could ride over anything and it would eat it up. This secure feeling also has to do with how rigid it is from side to side and front to back. This provides an incredibly secure feeling and allows you to simply enjoy the suspension all 6-inches it. I rarely lock my fork down. I typically only lock it down when I am doing super steep technical single track and maybe on a long steep climb.

    The SC and DUC setup with only 5-to-10mm of ride height difference depending on how much sag you are running. This amounts to less than ½ a degree in the Headtube angle but contrary to what Harlan commented on I do notice that difference. I’m a pretty experienced rider so this might have something to do with it but I do believe firmly that all bikes set up differently even if their geometry charts have them saying they should be the same. It’s kind of like driving a VW then getting driving a SUBARU. They both have a distinctly different feel when driving them even if they are model/price competitors. The SC seems a little steep in the headtube angle for my preferred AM position but if you are into really switchback style single track it might be a toss up between the two. At this point the turning radius might be the deciding factor. The DUC will turn about 80-to-82 degrees to the side best my eye can tell where the SC can turn a full 90 degrees. For me this isn’t ever an issue and I do run into switchbacks on my rides but something you may want to consider. All in all the strong points of riding the DUC far outweigh the only possible negative of full 90-deg turning in my humble opinion. Get the DUC you will LOVE it too.

    Tim
    WrenchScience.com
    Hey Tim:
    I agree with you totally. I do feel the difference too on the slight difference in HA. I'm just saying that there are a lot of things that I, and I suspect many others, could do to improve are handling before I would buy a SC32 over a DUC for that reason.

  27. #27
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    I am almost 99% sure that I am gonna run a DUC on my ML7/5, but I'm gonna throw this question out there for one last discussion. I guess I'm just worried about the DUC in climbing situations, which for me is almost 3/4's of my riding. Does anyone know what the guys and gals from Maverick run on their rigs for XC racing?
    Again most of my riding/racing is on tight/technical singletrack, typical eastcoast rocky trails. Tim from WrenchScience has had the best advice and Maverick VP Ed Kuh also recommends the DUC stating that the ML7/5 frame is setup mostly for the DUC fork. I guess I am just looking to confirm my decision. Thanks again in adavnce.
    Isn't it cool that Maverick is so into the mountainbiking scene?
    Ride it, don’t write about it!

  28. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotto
    I am almost 99% sure that I am gonna run a DUC on my ML7/5, but I'm gonna throw this question out there for one last discussion. I guess I'm just worried about the DUC in climbing situations, which for me is almost 3/4's of my riding. Does anyone know what the guys and gals from Maverick run on their rigs for XC racing?
    Again most of my riding/racing is on tight/technical singletrack, typical eastcoast rocky trails. Tim from WrenchScience has had the best advice and Maverick VP Ed Kuh also recommends the DUC stating that the ML7/5 frame is setup mostly for the DUC fork. I guess I am just looking to confirm my decision. Thanks again in adavnce.
    Isn't it cool that Maverick is so into the mountainbiking scene?

    Hey Scotto,

    If you are truly XC racing the SC32 might be a better choice for you but if you just do a lot of climbing while riding XC and want to make sure the ML7.5 climbs well with the DUC I can assure you that you will not be disappointed. This bike climbs like a Billy goat regardless of the fork.

    Wrench Scientist

  29. #29
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    It's all over, I'm goin' with the DUC. Even better it's gonna be the same color as the frame, hard ano. I guess Maverick just started that. Thanks for all the advice, now I just can't wait to ride.
    Ride it, don’t write about it!

  30. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotto
    It's all over, I'm goin' with the DUC. Even better it's gonna be the same color as the frame, hard ano. I guess Maverick just started that. Thanks for all the advice, now I just can't wait to ride.
    You are going to be super happy with that bike. Let me know if I can help with the purchase.

    Wrench Scientist
    aka - Tim

  31. #31
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    Yep Scotto, you did right. Everyone here at our shop sold thier ML7's and bought 7.5s with DUC up front. That front derail is money on it or you can go the mod that Wrench Scientist was talking about. We are right outside boulder, only about 8 miles from Maverick so that of course rubs off on us. Enjoy the bike and when you are setting up that front derail, either ask someone who has one, or post here if you are having trouble--the cable will be a little more slack than a conventional front derail. Enjoy! JP

    Something that was not stated here but may be of interest is that you cannot upgrade your old ML7 to a 7.5--the triangles look like they will fit, but they do not. And for sure, as stated above, the new 7.5 is lighter AND stiffer--way cool! FYI

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    Not to get off the subject of the DUC, but has anyone had problems with the Maverick rear shock? I bought a used 7.3 and the shock doesn't seem to hold air very well. I have taken it riding (I ride it at 160#) and have to pump it back up at the top of the climb because it went down to about 100#

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogisnuts
    Not to get off the subject of the DUC, but has anyone had problems with the Maverick rear shock? I bought a used 7.3 and the shock doesn't seem to hold air very well. I have taken it riding (I ride it at 160#) and have to pump it back up at the top of the climb because it went down to about 100#
    Hey Dogisnuts,

    I would first check the value core to make certain this isn’t loose. Secondly I would check the valve itself to make certain it is also tight. If both of these are tight then I would suspect that the seal has gone bad and you need to have the shock overhauled. In this case you will need to work with a Maverick dealer that has a Maverick shock tool kit. If the dealer doesn’t have a Maverick shock tool kit or you don’t have dealer close to you we can do the service for you. Another option would be to send the shock directly to Maverick. If you want to work with us give me a call at 866.497.3624 x 209 and I will take care of you.

    Wrench Scientist
    AKA - Tim

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    Good job! Why not use presta?

    Tim,

    Thanks for the info. No oil is leaking anywhere. I will try a new schrader valve.

  35. #35

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    Dogisnuts,

    The 7.3 comes with a air shock not oil. That is why the air pressure is dropping. Although there is some oil in the shock but it is purely for lubrication and thus you would not see any dripping out.

    Wrench Scientist

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogisnuts
    Not to get off the subject of the DUC, but has anyone had problems with the Maverick rear shock? I bought a used 7.3 and the shock doesn't seem to hold air very well. I have taken it riding (I ride it at 160#) and have to pump it back up at the top of the climb because it went down to about 100#
    As documented on the Maverick web site, the most common cause of air leakage is debris in the main seal. In my experience, it helps to make sure that the lower set screws are properly tightened, as well.

    Take the shock off your bike, disassemble it according to Maverick's directions (available on the web site), clean everything, then reassemble. If you are mechanically inclined, it won't be hard.

    If you have an air leak, assuming that nothing's really busted, you will be able to service the shock with allen wrenches alone.

    You'll need the service kit only to disassemble the damper unit.

  37. #37
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    Question: Klein / Maverick 7.3 shock compatibility

    Question: since I can't swing the cash for a 7.5, I am trying to milk a little extra out of my 7.0 (7.1?) by getting an all-air rear shock. There are brand new Klein Palomino shocks on ebay. They look like the 7.3.

    Are they absolutely positively 100% the same shock as the 7.3? Size, travel, mounting, valving? They look to be "champaign" in color (not my first choice).

    Of course, another question will be: will I notice an improvement over my existing coil/air (I think it was the latest Fox version ~early 2003 model)? I have never felt it provided the feel that others brag about on their Mavericks.

    Also, I have a Fox Talas up front, and regarding the DUC /SUC discussions, I can't really comment on those, but I run my fork at lower travel quite frequently just for the steeper head angle, and more tilted-forward riding position for 1) climbing, 2) ultra-tight switchback or twisty-thru-the-trees stuff. I like the feel of the full 125mm travel but think there are times when the HA slackness detracts. Again, no direct experience with a Mav fork, or with the newest frames.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by impatient
    Question: since I can't swing the cash for a 7.5, I am trying to milk a little extra out of my 7.0 (7.1?) by getting an all-air rear shock. There are brand new Klein Palomino shocks on ebay. They look like the 7.3.

    Are they absolutely positively 100% the same shock as the 7.3? Size, travel, mounting, valving? They look to be "champaign" in color (not my first choice).

    Of course, another question will be: will I notice an improvement over my existing coil/air (I think it was the latest Fox version ~early 2003 model)? I have never felt it provided the feel that others brag about on their Mavericks.

    Also, I have a Fox Talas up front, and regarding the DUC /SUC discussions, I can't really comment on those, but I run my fork at lower travel quite frequently just for the steeper head angle, and more tilted-forward riding position for 1) climbing, 2) ultra-tight switchback or twisty-thru-the-trees stuff. I like the feel of the full 125mm travel but think there are times when the HA slackness detracts. Again, no direct experience with a Mav fork, or with the newest frames.
    I just ordered one of these shocks off ebay for my ml7.2, sure they are the same but all air for better tuning.

    When I got my ml7 I swapped my palomino shock onto it and it fitted perfectly and worked just fine.....should have swapped it there and then!!

    Weight is the same too - am guessing you got the dark grey shock same as me at the moment (with the rebound dial on the side as opposed to the top on the new/Klein shock you are looking at)

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by impatient
    Question: since I can't swing the cash for a 7.5, I am trying to milk a little extra out of my 7.0 (7.1?) by getting an all-air rear shock. There are brand new Klein Palomino shocks on ebay. They look like the 7.3.

    Are they absolutely positively 100% the same shock as the 7.3? Size, travel, mounting, valving? They look to be "champaign" in color (not my first choice).

    Of course, another question will be: will I notice an improvement over my existing coil/air (I think it was the latest Fox version ~early 2003 model)? I have never felt it provided the feel that others brag about on their Mavericks.

    Also, I have a Fox Talas up front, and regarding the DUC /SUC discussions, I can't really comment on those, but I run my fork at lower travel quite frequently just for the steeper head angle, and more tilted-forward riding position for 1) climbing, 2) ultra-tight switchback or twisty-thru-the-trees stuff. I like the feel of the full 125mm travel but think there are times when the HA slackness detracts. Again, no direct experience with a Mav fork, or with the newest frames.
    You can remove the spring from your existing shock and make it an all air rear shock. This is what they did for the Reposado when it first came out. It will save you some dough from getting a whole new shock that basically only has the spring removed.
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