Evo suspension options- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Evo suspension options

    I ride an Evo with a 2005 36 Talas (150mm max) and DHX air. My son has 2 Yetis, an ASX with a Totem/DHX 5 and a 575 with a Pike/RP23.

    We live a long way from service, so when stuff needs to be fixed we often swap parts around so we always have at least 2 bikes working.

    The Totem recently did a long bout of service, so I snagged the DHX 5 and tried it out on the Evo for a while. When the Totem came back I sent the 36 and the DHX Air down, now the kid is riding the ASX and the Evo is wearing the Pike and the RP23.

    Some observations out of all this:

    1. The Totem has major maintenance issues. Lovely when it works, but it often doesn't. Maybe ok if you have easy access to good service, but otherwise I'd avoid it. In retrospect, I wish we'd got a 66 instead.

    2. Coil shock on the Evo is most excellent. I'm planning to replace the DHX Air with a coil permanently, after trying it out. The coil shock had a 2.25" stroke, and I see no evidence that the suspension bracket ever impacted the seat tube. Maybe that just means I'm not riding it hard enough. If I were Chumba I'd spec it with coil from the start, though I'm sure they have their reasons.

    3. The Pike and RP23... well, all I can say is I can't wait to get my stuff back. Ok, it works, it's rideable, but it doesn't feel right. Maybe part of that is psychological, just looking down at the Pike when you're used to the 36 does not inspire confidence. I can't even really clarify what specifically feels wrong, but it feels wrong.

    Conclusions...

    If you're buying/riding an Evo, its definitely worth considering going coil. It's heavier, but if you're a weight weenie you don't want an Evo anyway. The coil just feels good.

    36 and Evo is a very good match (Probably 55 or Lyric too, but I can't say from experience). If you want more than 160mm, think about 66 instead of Totem unless you really enjoy having stuff fixed.

    If you really want a Pike and/or RP23, think XCL instead of Evo. It's just not enough fork/shock to do what the Evo wants to do.

    Just my opinion (obviously).

  2. #2
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    Interesting post

    I am glad you posted this information. I have a DHX 5.0 Coil which is the correct i2i for my Evo but the shock has a 2.25" stroke instead of the Evo's 2.0". I have a 2007 freeride frame which has a slacker seat tube angle. I've been curious if my shock would work on the Evo without hitting the seat tube. I'm tempted to give it a try. I a big guy at 240lbs geared up and the DHX Air is a little overworked in my opinion. I just finished building up the Evo so I'll get some real ride time in this weekend. I am curious if I will bottom out the DHX Air. The coil seems like the logical choice for the Evo.

  3. #3
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    Old thread, but I had my shock off to fix one of forward mount pin and with the suspension in full bump (seat stay yoke hitting the seat tube) there was a rough measurement of about 5.3125 ish. So 7.875 - 2.25 = 5.625 if your eye to eye at full is less than 5.625 you should be in the clear. I too have been thinking about picking up a 7.875x2.25 stroke DHX 5 to replace the DHX air.

    Any one have a good spring rate recommendation for about 200 lbs with gear?

    Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Spring rate for DHX 5.0 on Evo

    I'm 240 geared up and Chumba recommended a 700lbs spring. I ran a 600lbs spring and the bike was extremely plush. I picked up the recommended 700lbs spring and it is perfect. Still plush but much less sag. I'd call Chumba before buying to confirm their recommended spring rate before buying a spring.

  5. #5
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    Spring weight

    I'd say you would need either a 600 or 650lb spring. As for hitting the seat tube running a 2.25" stroke, I have had no issues. Even running the softer 600lb spring and bottoming the fork there were no contact. I called Chumba prior to installing the 2.25" stroke shock and they said give it a try and more than likely you should be ok. I have the freeride geomety on my Evo with the slacker seat tube angle. Seems to me that I would have even less clearence than the steeper seat tube models. At least common sense tells me so. Not very scientific but I have had no prolems.

    I do have a question bugging me, if running a longer stroke 2.25" shock, how much more travel than 160mm is the Evo going to have? Does anyone know the answer?

  6. #6
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    I guess you could figure it out from the leverage ratio, axle path and if there are any interruption issues (most likely none). Don't have enough geo info to do the math for you though.
    Hey man, wanna go for a klunk?

  7. #7
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    Increased travel calculation

    Quote Originally Posted by bailout
    I guess you could figure it out from the leverage ratio, axle path and if there are any interruption issues (most likely none). Don't have enough geo info to do the math for you though.
    Does anyone else know the travel difference on a Evo going from a 2" stroke shock to a 2.25" stroke shock?

  8. #8
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    Longer Stroke

    Quote Originally Posted by 67degrees
    Does anyone else know the travel difference on a Evo going from a 2" stroke shock to a 2.25" stroke shock?
    My guess would be approximately 2.25/2 * 6" = 6.75".
    Approximately.
    GregC

  9. #9
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    ..

    Depending on what size you have and year model - you might be able to squeeze another another 1/8" to 1/2" - fyi - this is speculative on my part.
    Simple | Proven | Reliable

    http://chumbaracing.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
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    so ive got a question... just recently stepped up to the evo from my xcl and just moved my dhx air (7.875x2.0) from one to the other. never had any complaints about the dhx air on my xcl unlike many that seemingly hate that shock. anyhow... now it seems like i really blow through the first 1/2 to 2/3 of the stroke, even with the propedal cranked all the up. kinda wallows mid stroke although i have been hitting some decent sized hits (for me anyway and im 220 geared up) and havent noticed it bottom out yet. i initially thought the evo was designed for a longer (2.25 or 2.5") stroke and that was the root of my problem but now i realize they are both designed for 2.0"...

    any thoughts on how to get that more consistent feel back to the shock... ive messed with the main chamber pressure some and maybe increasing that will be all i need.

    is there a generally accepted set-up for the dhx air on the evo or is it a crapshoot?

    also, what is the consensus (if there really is one) in regards to THE shock for the evo... dhx coil? dhx air? ccdb? roco air? roco coil? for when i get the $$$ together for a new one?

    thanks

  11. #11
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    Running the DHX air, initially I reduced the piggyback chamber volume and put the boost pressure near max, this worked pretty well to keep out of mid stroke. After the winter I raised the main pressure and backed off on the boost pressure which put me a little more into mid stroke. I think that i will end up raising the boost pressure again to see if that pushes me higher up in the travel. I typically run one or two clicks of pro pedal, unless it is a really sustained climb.

    So raising the boost valve pressure and or reducing the volume might help you there.


    The best tuning description that i could find is at: http://www.yeticycles.com/11_Support...sManual575.pdf Far better than anything I could find at Fox. . .

    As far as the switch to a 2.25 inch stroke, I did some rough measurements on the bike stand with the shock removed and it looks like about 6.6 - 6.7 or so inches of travel with the longer stroke. This is on a large 08 all mountain geometry bike. I have about 5/16 of available space even with the longer stroke shock. It looks as if a 2.5 stroke shock would even fit with minimal clearance on the seat tube to seat stay yoke.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by happy_ending
    so ive got a question... just recently stepped up to the evo from my xcl and just moved my dhx air (7.875x2.0) from one to the other. never had any complaints about the dhx air on my xcl unlike many that seemingly hate that shock. anyhow... now it seems like i really blow through the first 1/2 to 2/3 of the stroke, even with the propedal cranked all the up. kinda wallows mid stroke although i have been hitting some decent sized hits (for me anyway and im 220 geared up) and havent noticed it bottom out yet. i initially thought the evo was designed for a longer (2.25 or 2.5") stroke and that was the root of my problem but now i realize they are both designed for 2.0"...

    any thoughts on how to get that more consistent feel back to the shock... ive messed with the main chamber pressure some and maybe increasing that will be all i need.

    is there a generally accepted set-up for the dhx air on the evo or is it a crapshoot?

    also, what is the consensus (if there really is one) in regards to THE shock for the evo... dhx coil? dhx air? ccdb? roco air? roco coil? for when i get the $$$ together for a new one?

    thanks
    I dont know if this answers your question, but I just did the same upgrade with the rp23 instead of the DHX and went on my first ride the other day and suffered hardly any bob with no propedal.
    I was running normal air pressure. I had the same problem as you on my old XCL with the DHX. A lot of blowing throught the first 1/3 to 1/2 of travel
    Didnt you get a new shock with your frame ?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by zocalo
    I dont know if this answers your question, but I just did the same upgrade with the rp23 instead of the DHX and went on my first ride the other day and suffered hardly any bob with no propedal.
    I was running normal air pressure. I had the same problem as you on my old XCL with the DHX. A lot of blowing throught the first 1/3 to 1/2 of travel
    Didnt you get a new shock with your frame ?
    nope... just the frame. id like to throw a coil on it or a new dhx air at some point. i still have my xcl frame so i will just transfer the old dhx air back to the xcl when i upgrade... same with the fork... running a talas 32 on the evo right now but will upgrade to a 36, lyric or 55 at some point then back to the xcl goes the talas 32.

  14. #14
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    [QUOTE=ortedd]Running the DHX air, initially I reduced the piggyback chamber volume and put the boost pressure near max, this worked pretty well to keep out of mid stroke. After the winter I raised the main pressure and backed off on the boost pressure which put me a little more into mid stroke. I think that i will end up raising the boost pressure again to see if that pushes me higher up in the travel. I typically run one or two clicks of pro pedal, unless it is a really sustained climb.

    So raising the boost valve pressure and or reducing the volume might help you there.
    [/QUOTE


    when you mention "boost" valve are you talking the main chamber... i thought the boost was the piggyback...im confused(not hard to do)?

    so are you suggesting to reduce the main chamber and increase the piggyback or vice versa?

    thanks

  15. #15
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    Boost valve is the piggy back. So set your sag with the main chamber (static) then increase the pressure in the piggy back to try to get you out of the wallowing affect, something to play around with. It seemed to help out with my bike.

    Pages 8 and 9 of the link below describe tuning the DHX air pretty well.

    Based on the description and the symptoms that you describe, you could decrease the bottom out resistance (since you are not bottoming out), than increase the pressure in the boost valve to stiffen the effects of pro pedal

  16. #16
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    thanks for the advice... going out for a ride soon. gonna try some stuff...

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