Evo Ride Report- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Evo Ride Report

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hardway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    768

    Evo Ride Report

    I've gotten over 160 miles of local rocky, ruttie trail under my Evo now, so I feel I know the bike pretty well. I'm going to try to cover all the highs and lows of my Evo as I've gotten to know her.

    Build:
    '06 M/L chumba evo
    fox dhx air 5.0
    Pike 426 coil
    sram x.9 gripshifters
    sram x.9 rear d
    shimanno xt front d
    avid bb7's
    holzfeller cranks, 22-32-bg
    howitzer bb
    mavic crossmax xl's
    specialized pro's
    sdg i-beam post with sdg bel-air saddle (I can't even tell you how much I hate this seat for rides over ten to fifteen miles. on shorter rides it seems fine.)
    I haven't weighed her yet, but I think she's around 34 lbs.

    My testing ground:
    Annadel State Park in Santa Rosa. Terrain is mostly singletrack, with lots of ups and downs through rockgardens and ruts.

    The ride:
    In order to get anything resembling the true Evo ride, it is very important to get the dhx air dialed in correctly.
    I rode my evo around for a couple days before I got the sag set up and the rebound and bottom out where I liked them. I've never had a rear shock before, of any kind, so I don't know if setting proper sag makes as big a difference on a coil shock, but on the dhx air it made all the difference in the world. So set the sag before you even ride one around the block.

    Climbing:
    The Evo climbs very well. There is a real feeling of efficient power transfer from leg to rear wheel. I was worried about it feeling mushy when I pushed hard, but it hasn't been a problem at all.
    When climbing fire roads or wide, fairly smooth trails, I turn the Pike down to ~100mm. At this setting, it is very easy to keep the Evo on line. When climbing through large rocks, I generally have to keep the Pike around 120mm to avoid smashing my pedals into the rocks. At 120mm, the front end wanders a little, but she still holds a line without much effort.
    The propedal adjustment on the dhx air works really well. If I turn it all the way up, I can really stand up and hammer away. Once I get my cadence matched to the very small motions in the rear end, it works really well for rocketing over root, small rocky sections, etc...
    I don't spend extended time climbing out of my saddle like I could on my hardtail though.
    I'm still getting used to climbing with a rear suspension, so I climb better every time I go out, but I'm still not as good at it as I was on my hardtail.
    The most consistant problem I have is this: I'm peddaling along uphill, through rocks. I lift my front tire up and ride over a larger rock or a step up in the trail. My rear tire hits the rock/ledge as I'm shifting my weight from rear to front. The rear suspension then springs back as it is freed from my weight. This generally causes my rear to slip a little as my body weight compresses my front shock. I go nowhere and have to step off.
    Again, I don't think this is a problem with the Evo, I just need to get used to moving my body a little differently.

    Descending:
    This bike goes downhill like a guided missle. It lives for descents and I'm starting to as well.
    The Pike is an awsome shock and it's all I really need for my local riding, but a larger, longer travel fork would be a better match for DH. I like to ride uphill too though, so I've got the Pike.
    The Evo feels so solid at high speeds. I can't feel the rear flex, and I'm coming from a hardtail. I can rail corners so hard on this bike it's crazy. It just feels so solid that it makes me confident to push the limits of my ability.
    The bike has a fairly compact footprint, which is great when I'm on the flowy singletrack with the hairpins. It's super easy to throw a foot down and whip the tail around 180.
    The Evo has a pretty slack head angle. I'm still getting used to making descions a bit earlier, because there basically is no last minute turning you can do at speed. This annoyed me at first, but the more I ride, the more I get used to it.
    The benefit of the slack head angle is the stability that it gives the bike. With the relatively short wheelbase, a steeper HA would probably make the bike sketchy, but the feel of the Evo is all solid.
    The Evo sucks up jumps and drops with ease. The biggest I've dropped so far has been about 5' to tranny and 5' to flat. Absolutely no problem for this bike, she could handle way, way more. She feels super solid on landings too.
    The one problem I've had so far in this area is with jumping. When I go over the lip of a jump, I tend to wind up a little nose down in my trajectory. I haven't crashed becasue of it, but I come down more foreward than I'd like. I think its because the center of gravity is more forward on the bike than other bikes I've had? I'm not sure. I can correct this if I shift a little back when I take off, so it's just a style thing I need to work on.

    Customer Service:
    Unfortunatly, I had an issue with a suspension bolt right off the bat. The upside of this was that I got to experience the customer support of
    Chumba. I was very impressed. I sent out an email on sunday morning when I discovered the problem. I didn't expect any response until monday. Alan at Chumba replied to my email in ten minutes and we'd worked out a solution within twenty minutes.
    So the guys at Chumba are super solid and stand behind their product 100%.

    Conclusion:
    Very competent climber. The bike climbs better every time I go out, as I get more used to it, so it probably climbs better than I know.
    The best descender I've had the privelege to throw a leg over. Solid, nimble, and fast.
    The geometry of the bike takes some getting used to, and the feel is particularly different for me coming of a hardtail, but the more I ride this bike, the more I love it. Hopefully this continues for a long time.
    Last edited by hardway; 10-22-2006 at 06:30 AM.

  2. #2
    locked - time out
    Reputation: TIMBERRR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,389
    Nice review

  3. #3
    nerfherder
    Reputation: scruffylooking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,674
    How's the Pike and Evo geometry? Do you feel like you need a longer fork?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hardway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    768
    I wouldn't say I NEED a longer fork, but it would be nice on the downs and larger drops.
    As long as I pick my line, I can fly through anything I've encountered so far, but with a beefier, longer travel fork, I don't think I'd have to worry about anything but the biggest boulders and such.
    As far as the geometry is concerned, the stance of the bike feels great within the pike's range of travel. The only problem I've had is hitting my pedals on rocks when the travel is turned down below ~ 110mm. I generally run the pike at 115 - 120mm when climbing to avoid this.
    At 140mm, the HA feels pretty slack, and turning is slower, but still very precise.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    174
    Hey Hardway I was just curious if you are still riding with the BB7's and if so, how they are treating you on this big of a bike. Also, what size rotors are you running?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hardway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    768
    I still have the bb7's. I have 80mm rotors on both front and back, and they provide PLENTY of stopping power for me (233 lbs w/gear as of last week) and the bike, which is up to around 35 - 36 lbs now I'm guessing. The brakes are really powerful and I can easily feather them with one or two fingers all the way to a complete stop.

    I have been contemplating hydraulics lately, though. The mechanicals require very frequent adjustment, which really couldn't be easier (you just turn a nob), but I'm lazy and am totally into being as "set it and forget it" as possible.
    Again, this has nothing at all to do with performance and everything to do with me being lazy, which is why I haven't found a way to justify it to myself yet.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    174
    any reason for using the bb7's, just ease of setting them up and maintaining?

    I like the ease of the mechanicals and I like the fact that they are less likely to suffer a major breakdown in the backcountry (ie breaking a hydraulic line) and ruining your day. It is a lot easier to bring an extra cable along than a bleed kit and dot fluid!

    I have them on my light bike and like them, and have wondered how they would do on my evo... so thanks for the info.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hardway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    768
    I had never set up hydraulics before I built this bike, and the bb7's were on sale at pricepoint, so I went with them.
    I agree with you on the dependability/ ease of repair aspect of mechanicals, I would just love to do away with adjusting the pads.

  9. #9
    aka baycat
    Reputation: Ryan G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,480
    Great review. Be fun to rip this bike down Boundary or Rough Go.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hardway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    768
    The rock gardens on Rough Go were some of the first things I hit up when I built this bike. I haven't been too many places outside the bay area to ride, but I think those rock gardens must stack up to most anywhere.
    It handles anything at Annadel pretty easily, it even makes a fairly smooth ride out of a two quarry decent.
    If I ever make it on a group ride with you out there, you're welcome to rip it a bit. Unfortunately, I don't get to ride that much on the weekends, so it's hard for me to get over there with the rest of the mtbr crew.

  11. #11
    aka baycat
    Reputation: Ryan G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,480
    Rough Go is one of my favorite descents in that park, and Boundary too because it is steep but not as technical.

    How tall are you by the way? Just as a reference for sizing.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hardway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    768
    I'm 5' 11" and have a 32" inseam. I ride the M/L Evo frame fits great, but there isn't a lot of standover, especially with the pike fully extended.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.